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6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a case study from the couple's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165224
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Anders Broström
Peter Johansson
Jan Albers
Jan Wiberg
Eva Svanborg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. andbr@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects - psychology
Cost of Illness
Fear
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frustration
Humans
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Obesity, Morbid - complications
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Snoring - etiology - psychology
Social Behavior
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen.
To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couple's perspective. METHODS AND THE CASE: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.
Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.
An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):89-9018396463
PubMed ID
17291832 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics and mortality risk in relation to obstructive and central sleep apnoea in community-dwelling elderly individuals: a 7-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125918
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Peter Johansson
Urban Alehagen
Eva Svanborg
Ulf Dahlström
Anders Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linkoping University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Jul;41(4):468-74
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sleep
Sleep Apnea, Central - mortality - physiopathology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - mortality - physiopathology
Stroke Volume
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Time Factors
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
little is known about demographic and clinical characteristics associated with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) or central sleep apnoea (CSA) in community-dwelling elderly. We also examined these (OSA and CSA) associations to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality.
a total of 331 community-dwelling elderly aged 71-87 years underwent a clinical examination and one-night polygraphic recordings in their homes. Mortality data were collected after seven years.
a total of 55% had SDB, 38% had OSA and 17% had CSA. Compared with those with no SDB and OSA, more participants with CSA had a left ventricular ejection fraction 75 years does not appear to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease or mortality, whereas CSA might be a pathological marker of CVD and impaired systolic function associated with higher mortality.
PubMed ID
22440587 View in PubMed
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Determinants of global perceived health in community-dwelling elderly screened for heart failure and sleep-disordered breathing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100504
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010 Sep-Oct;25(5):E16-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter Johansson
Urban Alehagen
Erland Svensson
Eva Svanborg
Ulf Dahlström
Anders Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010 Sep-Oct;25(5):E16-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depression - epidemiology
Dyspnea - epidemiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health status
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Quality of Life
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - epidemiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Abstract
The relationships between heart failure (HF), sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), insomnia, depressive symptoms, and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), as well as their relationship to Global Perceived Health (GPH) in an elderly community-dwelling population, have not been explored. Data from 331 community-dwelling elderly (71-87 years old) were collected by echocardiography, polygraphy, and specific questionnaires. Factor analyses and structural equation modeling were used to explore the relationships between HF, SDB, sleep, psychosocial factors, and GPH. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses derived a 5-factor model representing SDB, insomnia, systolic function, breathlessness/physical function, and psychosocial function. Structural equation modeling analyses were used to explore the relationships between the 5 factors and to GPH. Sleep-disordered breathing had a weak effect on systolic function, but no effects on any of the other factors or GPH were found. Psychosocial function and breathlessness/physical function directly affected GPH. Indirect effects on GPH, mediated by psychosocial function, were found for breathlessness/physical function and insomnia. Systolic function also had an indirect effect on GPH. The fact that SDB in the elderly has no obvious negative associations to sleep complaints or GPH does not exclude them from being adequately treated for SDB. However, the present study has shown that SDB, by means of self-rated sleep complaints and health-related quality of life, can be problematic to detect. Psychosocial function was the most important factor for perceived GPH as it had a direct effect, as well as mediated the factors breathlessness/physical function and insomnia effects, on GPH. This study indicates that interventions in clinical practice targeting psychosocial dysfunction, such as depressive symptoms, could help to improve GPH in the elderly with or without HF.
PubMed ID
20671565 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnoea in hypertensive primary care patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123960
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):107-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Anders Broström
Ola Sunnergren
Kristofer Årestedt
Peter Johansson
Martin Ulander
Barbara Riegel
Eva Svanborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden. anders.brostrom@hhj.hj.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):107-13
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In hypertensive primary care patients below 65 years of age, (i) to describe the occurrence of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and (ii) to identify the determinants of moderate/severe OSA.
Cross-sectional.
Four primary care health centres in Sweden.
411 consecutive patients (52% women), mean age 57.9 years (SD 5.9 years), with diagnosed and treated hypertension (BP >140/90).
Occurrence of OSA as measured by the apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI).
Mild (AHI 5-14.9/h) and moderate/severe (AHI > 15/h) OSA were seen among 29% and 30% of the patients, respectively. Comparing those without OSA with those with mild or moderate/severe OSA, no differences were found in blood pressure, pharmacological treatment (anti-hypertensive, anti-depressive, and hypnotics), sleep, insomnia symptoms, daytime sleepiness, or depressive symptoms. Obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m2) was seen in 30% and 68% of the patients with mild and moderate/severe OSA, respectively. Male gender, BMI > 30 kg/m2, snoring, witnessed apnoeas, and sleep duration >8 hours were determinants of obstructive sleep apnoea.
Previously undiagnosed OSA is common among patients with hypertension in primary care. Obesity, snoring, witnessed apnoeas, long sleep duration, and male gender were the best predictors of OSA, even in the absence of daytime sleepiness and depressive symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22643156 View in PubMed
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A gender perspective on sleeplessness behavior, effects of sleep loss, and coping resources in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45591
Source
Heart Lung. 2006 Mar-Apr;35(2):75-89
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ulla Edéll-Gustafsson
Eva Svanborg
Eva Swahn
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science, Linköping University, and Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. ulled@imv.liu.se
Source
Heart Lung. 2006 Mar-Apr;35(2):75-89
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to systematically compare perceived sleep quality, sleeplessness behavior, sense of mastery, self-esteem, depression, subjective health, and effects of sleep loss in men and women with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Further aims were to determine possible predictors of poor sleep quality and sense of mastery, as well as the consequences of too little sleep. METHODS: Comparative-correlation and predictive design were used. Patients with a history of stable angina pectoris scheduled to undergo coronary angiography at Linköping University Hospital in Sweden were included. There were 47 women and 88 men (mean age 62.4 years) with CAD. Structured interviews using validated questionnaires covered sleep quality and sleep habits, effects of sleep loss, psychologic resources, and depression. RESULTS: Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that sleeplessness behavior, depressed mood, female gender, and pharmacologic treatments with inflammation inhibitors significantly (P
PubMed ID
16543036 View in PubMed
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Hyperarousal, depression and quality of life--validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the Hyperarousal Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45596
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Mar;20(1):58-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Ulla Edéll-Gustafsson
John Carstensen
Quentin Regestein
Eva Swahn
Eva Svanborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 85 Linköping, Sweden. ulled@imv.liu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Mar;20(1):58-67
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIM: Research focusing on hyperarousability in association with general sensitivity to stress has increased. This study aimed to: (i) describe values for self-reported hyperarousal behaviour traits, depression, sleeplessness behaviour and health-related quality of life [The Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36)] in a gender-stratified random sample from the Swedish population; and (ii) test the validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the Hyperarousal Behavioural Trait Scale (H-scale). METHODS: In this study, 402 women and 391 men from Sweden were included. A test-retest study was performed on 297 subjects. RESULTS: The total mean score on the H-scale was 29.5 (SD 10.0, 95% CI 28.8-30.2). Compared to men, women scored higher on the H-scale (total score, sub-scales and many items), whereas no evidence of an age trend was seen. The H-scale has proven to be a valid and reliable scale. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed similar magnitude and direction between the H-scale and the Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale, as between the H-scale and the Vicious Cycle of Sleeplessness Behaviour Scale, Vitality, Mental Health and the Mental Component Summary index on the SF-36 respectively. The Cronbach's alpha for the H-scale was 0.84 and estimated stability test-retest point of time varies between 0.73 and 0.80. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates gender differences in response style in association with altered health-related quality of life. The H-scale is a valid and reliable self-reported scale for measuring hyperarousal behavioural trait research outcome in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
16489961 View in PubMed
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Restless legs syndrome during and after pregnancy and its relation to snoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125718
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jul;91(7):850-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Maria Sarberg
Ann Josefsson
Ann-Britt Wiréhn
Eva Svanborg
Author Affiliation
Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. maria.sarberg@lio.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jul;91(7):850-5
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Trimesters
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Restless Legs Syndrome - epidemiology
Snoring - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study development of restless legs syndrome (RLS) during and after pregnancy, and whether RLS is related to snoring or other pregnancy-related symptoms.
Prospective study.
Antenatal care clinics in the catchment area of Linköping university hospital, Sweden.
Five hundred consecutively recruited pregnant women.
Sleep disturbances, including symptoms of RLS and snoring, were assessed with questionnaires in each trimester. A complementary questionnaire was sent three years after delivery to women experiencing symptoms of RLS during pregnancy.
Symptoms of RLS in relation to snoring in each trimester.
Symptoms of RLS were reported by 17.0% of the women in the first trimester, by 27.1% in the second trimester and by 29.6% in the third trimester. Snoring in the first trimester was correlated to increased prevalence of RLS in all three trimesters (p= 0.003, 0.017 and 0.044 in the first, second and third trimester, respectively). No correlation was found between RLS and anemia, parity or body mass index. Among the women who experienced RLS, 31% still had symptoms three years after delivery. Fifty-eight per cent of those whose symptoms had disappeared stated that this happened within one month after delivery.
Symptoms of RLS progressed most between the first and second trimester. Women who snored in the first or second trimester of pregnancy had a higher prevalence of RLS in the third trimester, which indicates that snoring in early pregnancy might predict RLS later. Symptoms of RLS disappear quite soon after delivery, but about one-third of women with RLS during pregnancy may still have symptoms three years after childbirth.
PubMed ID
22458961 View in PubMed
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Side effects to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea: changes over time and association to adherence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265098
Source
Sleep Breath. 2014 Dec;18(4):799-807
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Martin Ulander
Malin Svensson Johansson
Amanda Ekegren Ewaldh
Eva Svanborg
Anders Broström
Source
Sleep Breath. 2014 Dec;18(4):799-807
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Dropouts
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - therapy
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective treatment against obstructive sleep apnoea, but adherence is often low, and side effects are common. It is unclear from previous research whether side effects are significant causes of nonadherence. No study has examined if side effects vary within subjects over time. The aims were to (1) examine the evolution of CPAP side effects over time, and (2) prospectively assess correlations between early CPAP side effects and treatment adherence.
One hundred eighty-six obstructive sleep apnoea patients from three sleep centres were prospectively enrolled. They completed the Side Effects to CPAP Inventory, where the respondent rates the frequency, magnitude and perceived impact on adherence from 15 side effects. Adherence was measured by treatment dropout and machine usage time.
The most common side effects were dry mouth, increased number of awakenings, blocked up nose, mask pressure and mask leaks. While some side effects were stable over time, others could both resolve and emerge within subjects. Dry mouth, mask leakage and blocked up nose emerged within 1 year in approximately 30% of patients who had not experienced them after 2 weeks. Increased number of awakenings and dry mouth after 1-2 weeks were significantly associated to treatment dropout during the first year and machine usage time after 6 months.
While some side effects are related to adherence, most are not. Not all side effects are stable over time. This, together with differences in methodology between studies, might explain the conflicting findings in earlier research.
PubMed ID
24557772 View in PubMed
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Sleep-wake activity rhythm and health-related quality of life among patients with coronary artery disease and in a population-based sample--an actigraphy and questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108237
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2013 Aug;19(4):390-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Anna Johansson
Eva Svanborg
Ulla Edéll-Gustafsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Skaraborgs Hospital, Skövde, Sweden. anna.m.johansson@vgregion.se
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2013 Aug;19(4):390-401
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Coronary Artery Disease - physiopathology
Humans
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sleep
Sweden
Wakefulness
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore whether there are gender differences in sleep and health-related quality of life in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a matched population-based sample and to see how subjectively rated sleep is associated with actigraphy. Secondly, to explore whether factors that predict patients' sleep quality could be identified. Fifty-seven patients with stable CAD and 47 participants from a population-based sample were included. All participants completed the Uppsala Sleep Inventory (USI), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the SF-36. Actigraphy recordings and a sleep diary were performed for seven 24-h periods. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that sleep duration, sleep onset latency, nocturnal awakenings, vitality (SF-36) and body mass index explained 60% of the sleep quality outcome (USI). Sleep duration, sleep efficiency and fragmentation index assessed with actigraphy and sleep diary accounted for 36% of the sleep quality outcome (diary). The result can form the basis for a non-pharmacological, self-care programme supported and led by nurses.
PubMed ID
23915408 View in PubMed
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