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Differences in muscle strength in dominant and non-dominant leg in females aged 20-39 years--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135247
Source
Phys Ther Sport. 2011 May;12(2):76-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Katharina Lanshammar
Eva L Ribom
Author Affiliation
Physiotherapy Ward, University Hospital, Entrance 85, s-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Phys Ther Sport. 2011 May;12(2):76-9
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Bone Density
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dominance, Cerebral
Female
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Leg - physiology
Motor Activity
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Torque
Abstract
In sports medicine, muscle strength and joint flexibility of the contralateral limb is used as a rehabilitation goal for the injured extremity. The present study was designed to determine whether side differences in hamstrings and quadriceps muscle strength, or in the ratio between hamstrings and quadriceps strength (H:Q), might be of clinical importance.
Cross-sectional study in a randomly selected, population-based cohort.
University hospital in Uppsala. Quadriceps and hamstrings strength was assessed by maximum isokinetic concentric contractions at an angular velocity of 90°/s.
A sample of 159 randomly selected women from Uppsala county population registers, aged 20-39 years, was included in the study.
Peak isokinetic concentric torques of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and the corresponding H:Q ratios.
In this cohort of non-athletes the muscle strength in the dominant leg was on average 8.6% (p 0.001) in the non-dominant leg.
Our study shows that in a population-based sample of women there is a significant asymmetry in leg muscle strength favouring non-dominant leg flexion and dominant leg extension. In this study the H:Q ratio was therefore substantially lower in the dominant leg. Whether this should influence rehabilitation goals must be further investigated.
PubMed ID
21496769 View in PubMed
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Estimation of physical performance and measurements of habitual physical activity may capture men with high risk to fall--data from the Mr Os Sweden cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154387
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e72-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eva L Ribom
Elin Grundberg
Hans Mallmin
Claes Ohlsson
Mattias Lorenzon
Eric Orwoll
Anna H Holmberg
Dan Mellström
Osten Ljunggren
Magnus K Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. eva.ribom@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e72-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Habits
Humans
Male
Physical Fitness
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate if clinically usable estimates of physical performance and level of habitual physical activity are associated with fall risk in elderly men. A population-based sample of 3014 randomly selected men aged 69-80 years was recruited to medical centers in Gothenburg, Malmoe, or Uppsala. The level of physical activity and self-reported falls during the preceding 12 months was evaluated using a questionnaire. The physical performance ability was estimated by measurements of handgrip strength, a timed stands test, a 6-m walking test and a 20-cm narrow walk test. Falls were reported in 16.5% of the men. Fallers performed 6.2+/-19.0% (mean+/-standard deviations; S.D.) less in right handgrip measures, 8.8+/-40.6% slower in the timed stands test, 6.8+/-30.8% slower in the 6-m walking test, and 5.3+/-28.8% slower in the 20-cm narrow walk test (all p
PubMed ID
18986717 View in PubMed
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Genetic variation in the human vitamin D receptor is associated with muscle strength, fat mass and body weight in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181179
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2004 Mar;150(3):323-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Elin Grundberg
Helena Brändström
Eva L Ribom
Osten Ljunggren
Hans Mallmin
Andreas Kindmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden. Elin.Grundberg@medsci.uu.se
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2004 Mar;150(3):323-8
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Body Composition - genetics - physiology
Body mass index
DNA - chemistry - genetics
Female
Genetic Variation
Humans
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics - physiology
Receptors, Calcitriol - genetics
Sweden
Abstract
Bone mineral density (BMD) is under strong genetic control and a number of candidate genes have been associated with BMD. Both muscle strength and body weight are considered to be important predictors of BMD but far less is known about the genes affecting muscle strength and fat mass. The purpose of this study was to investigate the poly adenosine (A) repeat and the BsmI SNP in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in relation to muscle strength and body composition in healthy women.
A population-based study of 175 healthy women aged 20-39 years was used.
The polymorphic regions in the VDR gene (the poly A repeat and the BsmI SNP) were amplified by PCR. Body mass measurements (fat mass, lean mass, body weight and body mass index) and muscle strength (quadriceps, hamstring and grip strength) were evaluated.
Individuals with shorter poly A repeat, ss and/or absence of the linked BsmI restriction site (BB) have higher hamstring strength (ss vs LL, P=0.02), body weight (ss vs LL, P=0.049) and fat mass (ss vs LL, P=0.04) compared with women with a longer poly A repeat (LL) and/or the presence of the linked BsmI restriction site (bb).
Genetic variation in the VDR is correlated with muscle strength, fat mass and body weight in premenopausal women. Further functional studies on the poly A microsatellite are needed to elucidate whether this is the functionally relevant locus or if the polymorphism is in linkage disequilibrium with a functional variant in a closely situated gene further downstream of the VDR 3'UTR.
PubMed ID
15012617 View in PubMed
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Population-based reference values of handgrip strength and functional tests of muscle strength and balance in men aged 70-80 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99234
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2010 Aug 11;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-2010
Author
Eva L Ribom
Dan Mellström
Osten Ljunggren
Magnus K Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Entrance 85, 1 Stairs, Physiotherapy Ward, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2010 Aug 11;
Date
Aug-11-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
With aging, the incidence of falls and fractures increases. There has during the last decades been secular changes in demographics so that the proportion of elderly increases in society. Hence, there is an increasing need for clinicians to be able to make a solid appraisal of the elderly patient's functional capacity, as to identify individuals with an increased risk to fall. If high risk individuals could be targeted fall preventive strategies might be implemented in specific risk cohorts. This would require reference values for muscle strength tests and functional tests, in order to defined high risk individuals performing inferior. From the MrOS Sweden cohort, 999 subjects aged 70-80 years were evaluated. Muscle strength and functional performance was tested by timed-stands test, 6-m and 20-cm narrow walk tests and Jamar handgrip strength test. Normative data is presented. With increasing age, there was a 10-18% successively decline in performance throughout the entire age span. This study provides reference values for handgrip strength and functional muscle tests in 70-80 years old men. The decline in the test values with increasing age, infer the use of age-specific normative data when using these tests both in clinical and research settings.
PubMed ID
20708281 View in PubMed
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