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Caregiving and volunteering among older people in Sweden--prevalence and profiles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98296
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):352-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
Magnus Jegermalm
Eva Jeppsson Grassman
Author Affiliation
Ersta Sköndal University College, Sköndal, Sweden. Magnus.jegermalm@esh.se
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2009 Oct-Dec;21(4):352-73
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Population Dynamics
Social Planning
Social Support
Social Welfare - economics - trends
Sweden
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration - trends
Voluntary Workers - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study examines the role of older people in Swedish society by exploring the prevalence of their informal caregiving and volunteering and by analyzing the profiles of these contributors of unpaid work. Data were collected by means of telephone interviews in a Swedish representative survey conducted in 2005. Our analysis reveals three distinct profiles of people involved in unpaid activities. One of these consists of those involved both in informal help giving and volunteering, a group that has been labeled "super helpers" or "doers" in earlier research. It is important for social policy planners to recognize these groups of older people and better understand the dynamics of their unpaid work in order to ascertain whether they might need support as providers and to enhance their well-being. There does not seem to be any simple contradiction between the parallel existence of a universal welfare model of the Swedish kind and an extensive civil society in which older people play important roles as active citizens.
PubMed ID
20092127 View in PubMed
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The glimmering embers: experiences of hope among cancer patients in palliative home care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136705
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2011 Mar;9(1):43-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Louise Olsson
Gunnel Ostlund
Peter Strang
Eva Jeppsson Grassman
Maria Friedrichsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Campus Norrköping, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden. louol@isv.liu.se
Source
Palliat Support Care. 2011 Mar;9(1):43-54
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Home Care Services
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Morale
Neoplasms - psychology
Palliative Care - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The experience of hope among cancer patients in palliative care is important information for healthcare providers, but research on the subject is sparse. The aim of this article was to explore how cancer patients admitted to palliative home care experienced the significance of hope and used hope during 6 weeks throughout the last phase of their life, and to assess their symptoms and hope status during 6 weeks throughout the last phase of their lives.
Eleven adult patients with cancer participated in 20 interviews and completed seven diaries. The participants were recruited from two palliative care units in the southeast of Sweden. The method used was Grounded Theory (GT), and analysis was based on the constant comparative method.
The core category, glimmering embers, was generated from four processes: (1) The creation of "convinced" hope, with a focus on positive events, formed in order to have something to look forward to; (2) The creation of "simulated hope," including awareness of the lack of realism, but including attempts to believe in unrealistic reasons for hope; (3) The collection of and maintaining of moments of hope, expressing a wish to "seize the day" and hold on to moments of joy and pleasure; and (4) "Gradually extinct" hope, characterized by a lack of energy and a sense of time running out.
The different processes of hope helped the patients to continue to live when they were close to death. Hope should be respected and understood by the professionals giving them support.
PubMed ID
21352617 View in PubMed
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A long life with a particular signature: life course and aging for people with disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127111
Source
J Gerontol Soc Work. 2012;55(2):95-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eva Jeppsson Grassman
Lotta Holme
Annika Taghizadeh Larsson
Anna Whitaker
Author Affiliation
National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden. eva.jeppsson-grassman@liu.se
Source
J Gerontol Soc Work. 2012;55(2):95-111
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged - psychology
Aging - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retirement
Sweden
Abstract
What does it mean to live a long life and grow old with disabilities? Or to be an aging parent and still be a caregiver to a disabled adult child? These are questions discussed in this article, the aim of which is to show how a life course perspective adds insight to the lived experience of disability and ageing of adults with disabilities. It is argued that the time concept is fundamental to the understanding of the lives of disabled people. Results are presented which challenge established knowledge regarding disability policies, autonomy, body, biographical disruption and prerequisites of active aging.
PubMed ID
22324328 View in PubMed
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Spiritual care in the last phase of life: a comparison between the Church of Sweden and the Church of Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136170
Source
J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2010;64(3):3.1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Eva Jeppsson Grassman
Anne Birgitta Pessi
Anna Whitaker
Elina Juntunen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden. evagr@isv.liu.se
Source
J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2010;64(3):3.1-10
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Community-Institutional Relations
Finland
Humans
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Pastoral Care - organization & administration
Religion and Medicine
Social Support
Spirituality
Sweden
Abstract
This article deals with the Church of Sweden and the Church of Finland and their spiritual support for parishioners during their end-of-life phase. Support for the dying seemed uncommon in both countries, while most parishes offered support for the bereaved. The Finnish respondents expressed more confidence in their spiritual role than did the Swedes. This may have to do with the role of the churches in their respective countries and the varying geographies of death.
PubMed ID
21404732 View in PubMed
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