Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Adaptation and reliability of the Readiness for Inter professional Learning Scale in a Danish student and health professional setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278118
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Feb 16;16:60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2016
Author
Birgitte Nørgaard
Eva Draborg
Jan Sørensen
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Feb 16;16:60
Date
Feb-16-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Educational Measurement - methods
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Occupations - education - standards
Humans
Interdisciplinary Studies - standards - trends
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Translations
Young Adult
Abstract
Shared learning activities aim to enhance the collaborative skills of health students and professionals in relation to both colleagues and patients. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale is used to assess such skills. The aim of this study was to validate a Danish four-subscale version of the RIPLS in a sample of 370 health-care students and 200 health professionals.
The questionnaire was translated following a two-step process, including forward and backward translations, and a pilot test. A test of internal consistency and a test-retest of reliability were performed using a web-based questionnaire.
The questionnaire was completed by 370 health care students and 200 health professionals (test) whereas the retest was completed by 203 health professionals. A full data set of first-time responses was generated from the 570 students and professionals at baseline (test). Good internal association was found between items in Positive Professional Identity (Q13-Q16), with factor loadings between 0.61 and 0.72. The confirmatory factor analyses revealed 11 items with factor loadings above 0.50, 18 below 0.50, and no items below 0.20. Weighted kappa values were between 0.20 and 0.40, 16 items with values between 0.40 and 0.60, and six items between 0.60 and 0.80; all showing p-values below 0.001.
Strong internal consistency was found for both populations. The Danish RIPLS proved a stable and reliable instrument for the Teamwork and Collaboration, Negative Professional Identity, and Positive Professional Identity subscales, while the Roles and Responsibility subscale showed some limitations. The reason behind these limitations is unclear.
Notes
Cites: Med Educ. 2001 Sep;35(9):876-8311555226
Cites: Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74843571
Cites: Med Educ. 1999 Feb;33(2):95-10010211258
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2005 Oct;19(5):492-50816308172
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2005 Dec;19(6):595-60316373215
Cites: Med Educ. 2006 May;40(5):415-2216635120
Cites: Med Educ. 2006 Jun;40(6):555-6116700771
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2006 Dec;20(6):619-3217095440
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2006 Dec;20(6):633-917095441
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;60(1):34-4217161752
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2007 Aug;21(4):433-4317654160
Cites: Med Educ. 2008 Apr;42(4):405-1118338993
Cites: Med Educ. 2009 Sep;43(9):912-2219709016
Cites: J Allied Health. 2009 Winter;38(4):196-20020011817
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2010 Jan;24(1):41-5219705318
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2010 Sep;24(5):549-6420218778
Cites: J Interprof Care. 2012 Jan;26(1):56-6322233369
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2008 Oct;43(5 Pt 1):1708-2118479404
PubMed ID
26879933 View in PubMed
Less detail

Informed choice about Down syndrome screening - effect of an eHealth tool: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273182
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Dec;94(12):1327-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Mette M Skjøth
Eva Draborg
Ronald F Lamont
Claus D Pedersen
Helle P Hansen
Claus T Ekstrøm
Jan S Jørgensen
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Dec;94(12):1327-36
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Choice Behavior
Denmark
Down Syndrome - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an eHealth intervention (interactive website) on pregnant women's ability to make an informed choice about Down syndrome screening.
The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial with allocation to an intervention group and a control group in a ratio of 1:1. Subsequent subgroup analysis was conducted. Participants were recruited from 5 August 2013 to 25 April 2014 at Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Inclusion criteria were: pregnant women aged =18 years who were invited to participate in Down syndrome screening. Exclusion criteria were: high risk of abortion, psycho-socially vulnerable women, late referral, inability to speak Danish and women declining to participate. The primary outcome was informed choice about Down syndrome screening. The Multidimensional Measure of Informed Choice was used to assess whether the choice was informed or uninformed.
A total of 1150 participants were included in the study, of which 910 (79%) completed the questionnaire. Only a minority (30% of the women in the intervention group) actually used the website. There was no significant difference in the groups with respect to making an informed choice. The mean knowledge scores were significantly higher for those in the intervention group who used the intervention.
An interactive website with information about Down syndrome screening had no direct effect on making an informed choice. However, the majority of the pregnant women who used the website were satisfied with the website and would recommend it to others.
PubMed ID
26332592 View in PubMed
Less detail

Interprofessional clinical training improves self-efficacy of health care students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116789
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Jun;35(6):e1235-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Birgitte Nørgaard
Eva Draborg
Erik Vestergaard
Eva Odgaard
Didde Cramer Jensen
Jan Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kolding Hospital, Skovvangen 2-8, Kolding, Denmark. birgitte.noergaard@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Jun;35(6):e1235-42
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Denmark
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Female
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Interdisciplinary Studies
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Students, Medical - psychology
Teaching - methods
Abstract
Interprofessional collaboration potentially enhances patient safety and satisfaction, and reduces tensions and conflicts among health professionals. However, health professionals often lack sufficient knowledge of other professional roles and competences to engage in interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an interprofessional training programme on students' perceived self-efficacy.
A quasi-experimental study with an intervention group (239 students) and a control group (405 students). The intervention was an interprofessional clinical study (ICS) unit including students from nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, laboratory technology and radiography. Data on students' perceived self-efficacy were collected through web-based questionnaires. Aspects of self-efficacy measured were: (1) collaboration with other professions in planning goals and actions for patients; (2) collaboration with other professions for rehabilitation; (3) identifying the functions of other professions and (4) assessing and describing patients' needs and problems.
All scores of perceived self-efficacy for the ICS group improved over time although one score change was non-significant (p?=?0.08). After adjustment for baseline differences and the score change for the control group, the ICS group's self-efficacy score gain remained statistically significant.
The study showed that interprofessional training improved students' perception of self-efficacy more than traditional clinical training.
PubMed ID
23360486 View in PubMed
Less detail

Organizational evaluation of an interprofessional study unit--results from a Danish case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121567
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 Nov;26(6):497-504
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Didde Cramer Jensen
Birgitte Nørgaard
Eva Draborg
Erik Vestergaard
Eva Odgaard
Jan Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Health Services Research and Technology Assessment, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. dcj@crf.au.dk
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 Nov;26(6):497-504
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Efficiency, Organizational
Focus Groups
Humans
Interdisciplinary Studies
Interprofessional Relations
Medical Staff, Hospital - education
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Surgery Department, Hospital
Abstract
This article presents results from an organizational evaluation of an interprofessional clinical study unit (ICS) in Denmark. The aim of this study was to test whether the ICS was based on a durable organizational concept and to identify the prerequisites for the unit to be successful. The evaluation framework was "theory-based evaluation". A program theory was developed based on the concepts and expectations of the steering committee which initiated and designed the ICS. The program theory was tested for conflicts of interest among the stakeholders related to the ICS regarding prerequisites for the study unit to function organizationally. Further analysis examined whether these conditions had been present during the project period and whether all elements had been correctly implemented. The results suggested that although the ICS had taken into account stakeholders' requests, it was not possible to fully implement all the necessary conditions identified as essential for the unit to function successfully. The results generate a set of recommendations for future ICS units to function successfully.
PubMed ID
22897365 View in PubMed
Less detail