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Body composition and bone mineral density in children with premature adrenarche and the association of LRP5 gene polymorphisms with bone mineral density.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148293
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Nov;94(11):4144-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Pauliina Utriainen
Jarmo Jääskeläinen
Anne Saarinen
Esko Vanninen
Outi Mäkitie
Raimo Voutilainen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Pediatrics, University of Kuopio and Kuopio University Hospital, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland. pauliina.utriainen@uku.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Nov;94(11):4144-51
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenarche - genetics
Body Composition
Bone Density - genetics
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Femur Neck - anatomy & histology
Finland
Humans
LDL-Receptor Related Proteins - genetics
Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-5
Male
Pituitary Gland - growth & development
Polymorphism, Genetic
Reference Values
Spine - anatomy & histology
Abstract
Precocious increase in adrenal androgen production is the hallmark of premature adrenarche (PA). Adrenal androgens have anabolic properties.
The objective of the study was to test whether body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) are altered in PA and study whether genetic variation in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) affects BMD in PA.
This was a cross-sectional study.
The study was conducted at a university hospital.
The study included 126 prepubertal children (64 with PA, 10 boys; 62 non-PA controls, 10 boys). Femoral neck and lumbar spine areal and calculated volumetric BMD (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), body composition (bioimpedance), serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and markers of bone turnover and calcium homeostasis were compared between the PA and control groups. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of LRP5 were determined and associated with BMD.
Children with PA had higher femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD(areal) than the controls (Z-score 0.56 vs. -0.09, P
PubMed ID
19789208 View in PubMed
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Comparison of gated single-photon emission computed tomography with magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140411
Source
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2011 Apr;27(4):629-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Petri Sipola
Keijo Peuhkurinen
Esko Vanninen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Eastern Finland, Puijonlaaksontie 2, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. petri.sipola@kuh.fi
Source
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2011 Apr;27(4):629-34
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiac-Gated Single-Photon Emission Computer-Assisted Tomography
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - diagnosis - pathology - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Female
Finland
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine
Male
Middle Aged
Organophosphorus Compounds - diagnostic use
Organotechnetium Compounds - diagnostic use
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
Reproducibility of Results
Stroke Volume
Ventricular Function, Left
Young Adult
Abstract
To prospectively compare the left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), end-systolic volume (LVESV), and ejection fraction (LVEF) obtained from gated perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT) with those obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). Twenty-one patients with IDC (6 females) with a median age of 45 years (range 17-65) were scheduled for (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin-GSPECT and MRI within a 3 h interval. In both methods LV volumes were analyzed with the Simpson method. Both GSPECT and MRI were successfully completed in 90% of patients. Close linear correlations were observed between the two methods in LVEDV (R = 0.918; P
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2011 Apr;27(4):635-820924791
PubMed ID
20878255 View in PubMed
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Effects of ultrafine and fine particulate and gaseous air pollution on cardiac autonomic control in subjects with coronary artery disease: the ULTRA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172578
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2006 Jul;16(4):332-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Kirsi L Timonen
Esko Vanninen
Jeroen de Hartog
Angela Ibald-Mulli
Bert Brunekreef
Diane R Gold
Joachim Heinrich
Gerard Hoek
Timo Lanki
Annette Peters
Tuula Tarkiainen
Pekka Tiittanen
Wolfgang Kreyling
Juha Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland. Kirsi.Timonen@kuh.fi
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2006 Jul;16(4):332-41
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Autonomic Nervous System - physiology
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Electrocardiography
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Netherlands - epidemiology
Particle Size
Abstract
Previous studies have shown an association between elevated concentrations of particulate air pollution and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the association between daily variation of ultrafine and fine particulate air pollution and cardiac autonomic control measured as heart rate variability (HRV) was studied in a large multicenter study in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Erfurt, Germany, and Helsinki, Finland. Elderly subjects (n=37 in Amsterdam, n=47 in both Erfurt and Helsinki) with stable coronary artery disease were followed for 6 months with biweekly clinical visits. During the visits, ambulatory electrocardiogram was recorded during a standardized protocol including a 5-min period of paced breathing. Time and frequency domain analyses of HRV were performed. A statistical model was built for each center separately. The mean 24-h particle number concentration (NC) (1,000/cm(3)) of ultrafine particles (diameter 0.01-0.1 microm) was 17.3 in Amsterdam, 21.1 in Erfurt, and 17.0 in Helsinki. The corresponding values for PM2.5 were 20.0, 23.1, and 12.7 microg/m(3). During paced breathing, ultrafine particles, NO(2), and CO were at lags of 0-2 days consistently and significantly associated with decreased low-to-high frequency ratio (LF/HF), a measure of sympathovagal balance. In a pooled analysis across the centers, LF/HF decreased by 13.5% (95% confidence interval: -20.1%, -7.0%) for each 10,000/cm(3) increase in the NC of ultrafine particles (2-day lag). PM2.5 was associated with reduced HF and increased LF/HF in Helsinki, whereas the opposite was true in Erfurt, and in Amsterdam, there were no clear associations between PM2.5 and HRV. The results suggest that the cardiovascular effects of ambient ultrafine and PM2.5 can differ from each other and that their effect may be modified by the characteristics of the exposed subjects and the sources of PM2.5.
PubMed ID
16205787 View in PubMed
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Long-term epilepsy surgery outcomes in patients with MRI-negative temporal lobe epilepsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138453
Source
Epilepsia. 2010 Nov;51(11):2260-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Arto Immonen
Leena Jutila
Anu Muraja-Murro
Esa Mervaala
Marja Äikiä
Salla Lamusuo
Jyrki Kuikka
Esko Vanninen
Irina Alafuzoff
Aki Ikonen
Ritva Vanninen
Matti Vapalahti
Reetta Kälviäinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Arto.Immonen@kuh.fi
Source
Epilepsia. 2010 Nov;51(11):2260-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anterior Temporal Lobectomy
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Electrodes, Implanted
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe - diagnosis - physiopathology - surgery
Female
Finland
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Follow-Up Studies
Hippocampus - pathology
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Positron-Emission Tomography
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Temporal Lobe - physiopathology
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Treatment Outcome
Wechsler Scales
Young Adult
Abstract
The outcome of surgery in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and normal high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been significantly worse than in patients with unilateral hippocampal damage upon MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcomes of consecutive true MRI-negative TLE patients who all underwent standardized preoperative evaluation with intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) electrodes.
In this study we present all adult MRI-negative TLE surgery candidates evaluated between January 1990 and December 2006 at Kuopio Epilepsy Center in Kuopio University Hospital, which provides a national center for epilepsy surgery in Finland. During this period altogether 146 TLE surgery candidates were evaluated with intracranial electrodes, of whom 64 patients with normal high-resolution MRI were included in this study.
Among the 38 patients who finally underwent surgery, at the latest follow-up (mean 5.8 years), 15 (40%) were free of disabling seizures (Engel class I) and 6 (16%) were seizure-free (Engel class IA). Twenty-one (55%) of 38 patients had poor outcomes (Engel class III-IV). Outcomes did not change compared to 12-month follow-up. Histopathologic examination failed to reveal any focal pathology in 68% of our MR-negative cases. Only patients with noncongruent positron emission tomography (PET) results had worse outcomes (p = 0.044).
Our results suggest that epilepsy surgery outcomes in MRI-negative TLE patients are comparable with extratemporal epilepsy surgery in general. Seizure outcomes in the long-term also remain stable. Modern imaging techniques could further improve the postsurgical seizure-free rate. However, these patients usually require chronic intracranial EEG evaluation to define epileptogenic areas.
PubMed ID
21175607 View in PubMed
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Multiple abnormalities in glucose and energy metabolism and coordinated changes in levels of adiponectin, cytokines, and adhesion molecules in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177002
Source
Circulation. 2004 Dec 21;110(25):3842-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-2004
Author
Urpu Salmenniemi
Eija Ruotsalainen
Jussi Pihlajamäki
Ilkka Vauhkonen
Sakari Kainulainen
Kari Punnonen
Esko Vanninen
Markku Laakso
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Circulation. 2004 Dec 21;110(25):3842-8
Date
Dec-21-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - pathology
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Cell Adhesion Molecules - blood
Cytokines - blood
Endothelium, Vascular - physiopathology
Energy Metabolism
Exercise Test
Fasting - blood
Female
Finland
Glucose - metabolism
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - blood
Inflammation - blood
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Lipid Peroxidation
Lipids - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - metabolism - pathology
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Risk factors
Abstract
Detailed metabolic defects in glucose and energy metabolism and abnormalities in a variety of cardiovascular risk factors are largely unknown in subjects with the metabolic syndrome.
We characterized the metabolic syndrome in 119 nondiabetic offspring of diabetic probands. Cardiovascular risk factors, including cytokines and adhesion molecules, were measured. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp and indirect calorimetry; intra-abdominal fat and subcutaneous fat were assessed by CT; and maximal oxygen consumption was measured with a bicycle ergometer test. By applying factor analysis, we identified a single factor, the metabolic syndrome factor, from the following variables: 2-hour glucose, fasting insulin, body mass index, waist, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and mean blood pressure. Subjects with the highest factor score were defined as having the metabolic syndrome. During hyperinsulinemia, the highest factor score was associated with decreased rates of glucose oxidation and nonoxidative glucose disposal, high rates of lipid oxidation, low energy expenditure, and impaired suppression of free fatty acids during hyperinsulinemia. Furthermore, the metabolic syndrome was associated with a high amount of visceral fat, hypoadiponectinemia, a low maximum oxygen uptake, and high levels of C-reactive protein, proinflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules.
The metabolic syndrome is characterized by an excess of intra-abdominal fat, hypoadiponectinemia, insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, multiple defects in glucose and energy metabolism, and elevated levels of cytokines and adhesion molecules.
PubMed ID
15596567 View in PubMed
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Need for insulin to control gestational diabetes is reflected in the ambulatory arterial stiffness index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117211
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Henna Kärkkäinen
Tomi Laitinen
Nonna Heiskanen
Heli Saarelainen
Pirjo Valtonen
Tiina Lyyra-Laitinen
Esko Vanninen
Seppo Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obst/Gyn, Kuopio University Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, POB 1777, Kuopio FIN-70211, Finland. henna.karkkainen@kuh.fi
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:9
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis - metabolism
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Diabetes, Gestational - diet therapy - drug therapy - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin - metabolism - therapeutic use
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - metabolism
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Vascular Stiffness - physiology
Abstract
The aim was to evaluate the metabolic profile in conjunction with vascular function using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) in women with uncomplicated pregnancies and in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
Plasma glucose, lipids, HOMA -IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) and AASI, as obtained from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in third trimester pregnancy and at three months postpartum, were measured in three groups of women: controls (N=32), women with GDM on diet (N=42) and women with GDM requiring insulin treatment (N=10).
Women with GDM had poorer glycemic control and higher HOMA-IR during and after pregnancy and their total and LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol levels were significantly higher after pregnancy than in the controls. After delivery, there was an improvement in AASI from 0.26±0.10 to 0.17±0.09 (P=0.002) in women with GDM on diet, but not in women with GDM receiving insulin whose AASI tended to worsen after delivery from 0.30±0.23 to 0.33±0.09 (NS), then being significantly higher than in the other groups (P=0.001-0.047).
Women with GDM had more unfavorable lipid profile and higher blood glucose values at three months after delivery, the metabolic profile being worst in women requiring insulin. Interestingly, the metabolic disturbances at three months postpartum were accompanied by a tendency towards arterial stiffness to increase in women requiring insulin.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23324111 View in PubMed
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Particulate air pollution and risk of ST-segment depression during repeated submaximal exercise tests among subjects with coronary heart disease: the Exposure and Risk Assessment for Fine and Ultrafine Particles in Ambient Air (ULTRA) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188912
Source
Circulation. 2002 Aug 20;106(8):933-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2002
Author
Juha Pekkanen
Annette Peters
Gerard Hoek
Pekka Tiittanen
Bert Brunekreef
Jeroen de Hartog
Joachim Heinrich
Angela Ibald-Mulli
Wolfgang G Kreyling
Timo Lanki
Kirsi L Timonen
Esko Vanninen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Kuopio, Finland. Juha.Pekkanen@ktl.fi
Source
Circulation. 2002 Aug 20;106(8):933-8
Date
Aug-20-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Coronary Disease - diagnosis
Electrocardiography
Environmental Exposure
Exercise Test
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Humidity
Male
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Particle Size
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Temperature
Abstract
Daily variations in ambient particulate air pollution have been associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We therefore assessed the associations between levels of the 3 main modes of urban aerosol distribution and the occurrence of ST-segment depressions during repeated exercise tests.
Repeated biweekly submaximal exercise tests were performed during 6 months among adult subjects with stable coronary heart disease in Helsinki, Finland. Seventy-two exercise-induced ST-segment depressions >0.1 mV occurred during 342 exercise tests among 45 subjects. Simultaneously, particle mass
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2002 Aug 20;106(8):890-212186787
PubMed ID
12186796 View in PubMed
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Reference values for pulmonary diffusing capacity for adult native Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281295
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2017 Apr;77(2):135-142
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Annette Kainu
Jyri Toikka
Esko Vanninen
Kirsi L Timonen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2017 Apr;77(2):135-142
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carbon Monoxide - physiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Finland
Humans
Linear Models
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity - physiology
Reference Values
Sex Factors
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
Measurement standards for pulmonary diffusing capacity were updated in 2005 by the ATS/ERS Task Force. However, in Finland reference values published in 1982 by Viljanen et al. have been used to date. The main aim of this study was to produce updated reference models for single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide for Finnish adults. Single-breath diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide was measured in 631 healthy non-smoking volunteers (41.5% male). Reference values for diffusing capacity (DLCO), alveolar volume (VA), diffusing capacity per unit of lung volume (DLCO/VA), and lung volumes were calculated using a linear regression model. Previously used Finnish reference values were found to produce too low predicted values, with mean predicted DLCO 111.0 and 104.4%, and DLCO/VA of 103.5 and 102.7% in males and females, respectively. With the European Coalition for Steel and Coal (ECSC) reference values there was a significant sex difference in DLCO/VA with mean predicted 105.4% in males and 92.8% in females (p?
PubMed ID
28218012 View in PubMed
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Reference values of inspiratory spirometry for Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295609
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2018 07; 78(4):245-252
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-2018
Author
Annette Kainu
Kirsi L Timonen
Esko Vanninen
Anssi R Sovijärvi
Author Affiliation
a HUCH Heart and Lung Center , Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki , Helsinki , Finland.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2018 07; 78(4):245-252
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Inhalation
Male
Middle Aged
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Smoking
Spirometry - standards
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Inspiratory spirometry is used in evaluation of upper airway disorders e.g. fixed or variable obstruction. There are, however, very few published data on normal values for inspiratory spirometry. The main aim of this study was to produce reference values for inspiratory spirometry for healthy Finnish adults. Inspiratory spirometry was preplanned to a sample of the Finnish spirometry reference values sample. Data was successfully retrieved from 368 healthy nonsmoking adults (132 males) between 19 and 83?years of age. Reference equations were produced for forced inspiratory vital capacity (FIVC), forced inspiratory volume in one second (FIV1), FIV1/FIVC, peak inspiratory flow (PIF) and the ratios of FIV1/forced expiratory volume in one second and PIF/peak expiratory flow. The present values were compared to PIF values from previously used Finnish study of Viljanen et al. (1982) reference values and Norwegian values for FIV1, FIVC and FIV1/FIVC presented by Gulsvik et al. (2001). The predicted values from the Gulsvik et al. (2001), provided a good fit for FIVC, but smaller values for FIV1 with mean 108.3 and 109.1% of predicted values for males and females, respectively. PIF values were 87.4 and 91.2% of Viljanen et al. (1982) predicted values in males and females, respectively. Differences in measurement methods and selection of results may contribute to the observed differences. Inspiratory spirometry is technically more demanding and needs repeatability criteria to improve validity. New reference values are suggested to clinical use in Finland when assessing inspiratory spirometry. Utility of inspiratory to expiratory values indices in assessment of airway collapse need further study.
PubMed ID
29513047 View in PubMed
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Safety and feasibility of catheter-based local intracoronary vascular endothelial growth factor gene transfer in the prevention of postangioplasty and in-stent restenosis and in the treatment of chronic myocardial ischemia: phase II results of the Kuopio Angiogenesis Trial (KAT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185430
Source
Circulation. 2003 Jun 3;107(21):2677-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-3-2003
Author
Marja Hedman
Juha Hartikainen
Mikko Syvänne
Joachim Stjernvall
Antti Hedman
Antti Kivelä
Esko Vanninen
Hanna Mussalo
Esa Kauppila
Sakari Simula
Outi Närvänen
Arto Rantala
Keijo Peuhkurinen
Markku S Nieminen
Markku Laakso
Seppo Ylä-Herttuala
Author Affiliation
A.I. Virtanen Institute, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Circulation. 2003 Jun 3;107(21):2677-83
Date
Jun-3-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae - genetics
Adult
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects
Cardiac Catheterization
Chronic Disease
Coronary Restenosis - prevention & control
Coronary Vessels - drug effects - metabolism
Double-Blind Method
Endothelial Growth Factors - administration & dosage - biosynthesis - genetics
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Gene Transfer Techniques
Genetic Therapy - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Injections, Intra-Arterial
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - administration & dosage - biosynthesis - genetics
Lymphokines - administration & dosage - biosynthesis - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Safety
Stents - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors
Vascular Patency - drug effects
Abstract
Catheter-based intracoronary vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene transfer is a potential treatment for coronary heart disease. However, only limited data are available about local VEGF gene transfer given during angioplasty (PTCA) and stenting.
Patients with coronary heart disease (n=103; Canadian Cardiovascular Society class II to III; mean age, 58+/-6 years) were recruited in this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II study. PTCA was performed with standard methods, followed by gene transfer with a perfusion-infusion catheter. Ninety percent of the patients were given stents; 37 patients received VEGF adenovirus (VEGF-Adv, 2x10(10) pfu), 28 patients received VEGF plasmid liposome (VEGF-P/L; 2000 microg of DNA with 2000 microL of DOTMA:DOPE [1:1 wt/wt]), and 38 control patients received Ringer's lactate. Follow-up time was 6 months. Gene transfer to coronary arteries was feasible and well tolerated. The overall clinical restenosis rate was 6%. In quantitative coronary angiography analysis, the minimal lumen diameter and percent of diameter stenosis did not significantly differ between the study groups. However, myocardial perfusion showed a significant improvement in the VEGF-Adv-treated patients after the 6-month follow-up. Some inflammatory responses were transiently present in the VEGF-Adv group, but no increases were detected in the incidences of serious adverse events in any of the study groups.
Gene transfer with VEGF-Adv or VEGF-P/L during PTCA and stenting shows that (1) intracoronary gene transfer can be performed safely (no major gene transfer-related adverse effects were detected), (2) no differences in clinical restenosis rate or minimal lumen diameter were present after the 6-month follow-up, and (3) a significant increase was detected in myocardial perfusion in the VEGF-Adv-treated patients.
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2003 Jun 3;107(21):2635-712782613
PubMed ID
12742981 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.