Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9 records – page 1 of 1.

Anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the assessment of body composition in elderly Finnish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187518
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2002 Nov;22(6):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Irja Haapala
Anu Hirvonen
Leo Niskanen
Matti Uusitupa
Heikki Kröger
Esko Alhava
Aulikki Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. irja.haapala@uku.fi
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2002 Nov;22(6):383-91
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Body Composition
Body Weight
Electric Impedance
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Abstract
In this study, the bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), skinfold thickness measurement (STM) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as a reference method, were compared with each other in the assessment of body composition in elderly (62-72-year-old) Finnish women (n=93). BIA had better agreement with DXA in the assessment of fat free mass (FFM, R2=0.70, Sres=2.1) and fat mass (FM, R2=0.93, Sres=2.3) than the STM (FFM, R2=0.62, Sres=2.4; FM, R2=0.89,Sres=2.8). There was quite a large variation in the estimates when different BIA prediction equations were used. The equation developed in this study, FFM (kg)=-128.06 + 1.85 x BMI-0.63 x weight + 1.07 x height - 0.03 x resistance +10.0 x waist-hip ratio, yielded a small and unbiased error (0.5 +/- 1.6 kg), with a small residual standard deviation (R2=0.83, Sres=1.6). However, error associated with the estimate of FM was positively related to the degree of FM. BIA(Heitmann) equation yielded unbiased estimates of both FFM and FM (FFM, R2=0.77, Sres=1.8; FM, R2=0.95, Sres=1.9). Both the STM and BIA (manufacturer's equation) resulted in error which was statistically significant and positively correlated with FFM and FM. These results indicate that BIA prediction equations, chosen with care, can improve the performance of equations based upon anthropometric measurements alone in the assessment of body composition in elderly women.
PubMed ID
12464142 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of vitamin D(3) and calcium on fracture risk in 65- to 71-year-old women: a population-based 3-year randomized, controlled trial--the OSTPRE-FPS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145083
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Jul;25(7):1487-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Kari Salovaara
Marjo Tuppurainen
Matti Kärkkäinen
Toni Rikkonen
Lorenzo Sandini
Joonas Sirola
Risto Honkanen
Esko Alhava
Heikki Kröger
Author Affiliation
Bone and Cartilage Research Unit, Clinical Research Centre, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. kari.salovaara@kuh.fi
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Jul;25(7):1487-95
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Calcium - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cholecalciferol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Dietary Supplements
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - complications - drug therapy
Risk factors
Abstract
Antifracture efficacy of high-dose vitamin D (800 IU) and calcium (1000 mg) remains controversial. To determine whether daily 800 IU of vitamin D and 1000 mg of calcium supplementation prevents fractures, we randomized 3432 women of the population-based Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention (OSTPRE) Study cohort (ages 65 to 71 years) living in the region of northern Savonia, Finland (latitude 62 degrees to 64 degrees N) for 3 years to receive 800 IU of cholecalciferol and 1000 mg of calcium as calcium carbonate or to a control group that did not receive placebo. The main outcome measure was incident fractures. Fracture data were collected in telephone interviews and validated. Data on 3195 women, 1586 in the intervention group and 1609 in the control group, were available for analysis. In adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, the risk of any fracture decreased in the vitamin D and calcium group by 17% [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-1.12], and the risk of any nonvertebral fracture decreased by 13% (aHR = 0.87; 95% CI 0.63-1.19). The risk of distal forearm fractures decreased by 30% (aHR = 0.70; 95% CI 0.41-1.20), and the risk of any upper extremity fractures decreased by 25% (aHR = 0.75; 95% CI 0.49-1.16), whereas the risk of lower extremity fractures remained essentially equal (aHR = 1.02; 95% CI 0.58-1.80). None of these effects reached statistical significance. In conclusion, this study did not produce statistically significant evidence that vitamin D and calcium supplementation prevents fractures in a 65- to 71-year-old general population of postmenopausal women.
Notes
Comment In: J Bone Miner Res. 2010 Dec;25(12):2801; author reply 280220839284
PubMed ID
20200964 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of continuous combined hormone replacement therapy and clodronate on bone mineral density in osteoporotic postmenopausal women: a 5-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142867
Source
Maturitas. 2010 Aug;66(4):423-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010

Grip strength may facilitate fracture prediction in perimenopausal women with normal BMD: a 15-year population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156064
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2008 Aug;83(2):93-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Joonas Sirola
Toni Rikkonen
Marjo Tuppurainen
Jukka S Jurvelin
Esko Alhava
Heikki Kröger
Author Affiliation
Bone and Cartilage Research Unit, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. joonas.sirola@uku.fi
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2008 Aug;83(2):93-100
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Density - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Finland - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Perimenopause - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Spine - metabolism - radiography
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of grip strength measurements to predict fracture risk in perimenopausal women according to bone mineral density (BMD). A random sample of 971 perimenopausal women from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention study cohort was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the femoral neck and grip strength with a pneumatic squeeze dynamometer in 5-year intervals from baseline (1989-1991). Fractures during the 15-year follow-up were recorded based on self-reports and validated from medical records. In the total sample and in osteopenic or osteoporotic women (T score -1, n = 687) the lowest grip strength quartile had a significantly lower fracture-free survival rate in the Cox proportional hazard model (P = 0.005, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.0). In the multivariate Cox regression model, T score and grip strength were the only significant predictors of 15-year fracture-free survival in the N-BMD group and a risk index (RI) was formed according to HRs of these two variables. High RI (0-5 points) was associated with significantly lower 15-year fracture-free survival rate (P = 0.001, HR = 0.137) in the N-BMD group. In contrast, 5-year T score was no better a predictor of fractures in the baseline N-BMD group (P = 0.04, HR = 0.36). In conclusion, grip strength predicts 15-year fracture-free survival in perimenopausal women with N-BMD, while 5-year DXA does not seem to be any better a predictor of fracture risk. DXA measurements could be coupled with simple and cost-effective grip strength measurements. Controlling BMD in women with N-BMD could be abandoned.
PubMed ID
18641912 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hormone therapy protects from diabetes: the Kuopio osteoporosis risk factor and prevention study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151847
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2009 Jun;160(6):979-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Kati Pentti
Marjo T Tuppurainen
Risto Honkanen
Lorenzo Sandini
Heikki Kröger
Esko Alhava
Seppo Saarikoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kuopio University Hospital, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland. kati.pentti@fimnet.fi
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2009 Jun;160(6):979-83
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Postmenopause
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this population-based prospective cohort study was to examine the effect of hormone therapy (HT) on incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM).
Eight thousand four hundred and eighty-three DM-free post-menopausal women aged 52-62 from the population-based Kuopio osteoporosis risk factor and prevention study were followed for 5 years from 1994-1999. Information about the use of HT and health events was obtained from three repeated questionnaires in 1989, 1994, and 1999. DM morbidity before and during the follow-up was obtained from the Registry of Specially Refunded Drugs of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution. Kaplan-Meyer survival curves and Cox's proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the risk of incident DM in relation to the use of HT.
During the follow-up, 40.8% DM-free post-menopausal women had never used HT, 27.3% women were HT past users and 31.9% women had used HT presently during the follow-up. During the follow-up, 162 incident DM cases were recorded. Compared with never users of HT, the adjusted hazard ratio of DM was 0.81 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-1.16) for only past users, 0.53 (95% CI 0.24-1.15) in part-time (during the follow-up
PubMed ID
19321660 View in PubMed
Less detail

Role of chronic health disorders in perimenopausal fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175981
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1404-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Jukka Huopio
Risto Honkanen
Jukka Jurvelin
Seppo Saarikoski
Esko Alhava
Heikki Kröger
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. jukka.huopio@kuh.fi
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1404-11
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Femur Neck - radiography
Finland - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Menopause
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Abstract
Only a few studies have examined the risk of individual chronic health disorders on perimenopausal (i.e., around menopause) fractures in a single study. We evaluated the effect of chronic illnesses on fracture rate in a prospective cohort study of 3,078 women. These women were a stratified sample from the population base of 14,220 women aged 47-56 years and residing in the province of Kuopio in eastern Finland in 1989. Data on physician-diagnosed chronic diseases were collected by a baseline questionnaire in 1989. For certain diseases, questionnaire information of self-reported chronic disorders were compared with drug reimbursement data provided by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. Axial bone mineral density (BMD) measurements from the femoral neck and lumbar spine were performed in 1989-91. Two hundred sixty-five (265) women experienced at least one fracture during the follow-up period of 3.6 years (SD+/-0.78). The first fracture during the follow-up period was taken to be the end-point event. The risk of follow-up fracture for an individual health disorder was estimated with the Cox's proportional hazards model. Several chronic health disorders increased the fracture risk in perimenopausal women. However, hypertension was a statistically significant (p=0.018) risk factor for fracture (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.9), especially in overweight and obese (body mass index > or =28) women (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0). In addition, coronary heart disease (adjusted HR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.13-2.76), hyperthyroidism (adjusted HR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9), epilepsy (adjusted HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6), alcoholism (adjusted HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9.5) and chronic hepatic disease (adjusted HR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.7-16.4) predicted fracture. BMD was either normal or even elevated in disease groups. However, women with a fracture during the follow-up usually had decreased bone density, although the difference was statistically significant only in women with hypertension and hyperthyroidism. We conclude that hypertension, coronary heart disease, alcoholism, epilepsy and hyperthyroidism can markedly increase the risk of fracture in perimenopausal women and should be taken into account when assessing the risk of future fracture in an individual patient. Furthermore, in contrast to previous data, obesity alone does not increase the risk of perimenopausal fracture, but in association with hypertension the risk seems to be markedly elevated.
PubMed ID
15739033 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of calcium supplements and the risk of coronary heart disease in 52-62-year-old women: The Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151331
Source
Maturitas. 2009 May 20;63(1):73-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2009
Author
Kati Pentti
Marjo T Tuppurainen
Risto Honkanen
Lorenzo Sandini
Heikki Kröger
Esko Alhava
Seppo Saarikoski
Author Affiliation
Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Finland.
Source
Maturitas. 2009 May 20;63(1):73-8
Date
May-20-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calcium - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Coronary Disease - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - prevention & control
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
To analyse prospectively the effect of calcium or calcium+D supplementation on coronary heart disease (CHD) in 52-62-year-old women.
10,555 52-62-year-old women from the population-based Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE) who did not have CHD at baseline were followed for nearly 7 years in 1994-2001. Information about use of calcium supplements and health events was obtained from two repeated questionnaires in 1989 and 1994. Information about causes of death during the follow-up was obtained from the Statistics Finland. Information about CHD and other disease morbidity before and during the follow-up was obtained from the Registry of Specially Refunded Drugs of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution (SII). Cox's proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the risk of CHD morbidity related to the use of calcium supplements. At baseline, 2723 women reported current use of calcium or calcium+D supplementation. During the follow-up, CHD was diagnosed in 513 women. Compared to non-users of calcium/calcium+D supplements, the multivariate adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of CHD was 1.24 (95% CI 1.02-1.52) in women who used these supplements. The multivariate adjusted HR for CHD morbidity in postmenopausal women who used calcium/calcium+D supplements was 1.26 (95% CI 1.01-1.57).
Calcium or calcium+D supplementation appears to increase the risk of CHD among women before old age.
PubMed ID
19394167 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.