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The associations between psychological distress and healthcare use in patients with non-cardiac chest pain: does a history of cardiac disease matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299498
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 06 05; 18(1):172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-05-2018
Author
Ghassan Mourad
Tiny Jaarsma
Anna Strömberg
Erland Svensson
Peter Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Kungsgatan 40, S-601 74, Norrköping, Sweden. ghassan.mourad@liu.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 06 05; 18(1):172
Date
06-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anxiety - diagnosis - physiopathology
Chest Pain - diagnosis - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - physiopathology
Fear - physiology - psychology
Female
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Help-Seeking Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Health Questionnaire
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Psychological distress such as somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety and depressive symptoms is common among patients with non-cardiac chest pain, and this may lead to increased healthcare use. However, the relationships between the psychological distress variables and healthcare use, and the differences in relation to history of cardiac disease in these patients has not been studied earlier. Therefore, our aim was to explore and model the associations between different variables of psychological distress (i.e. somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety, and depressive symptoms) and healthcare use in patients with non-cardiac chest pain in relation to history of cardiac disease.
In total, 552 patients with non-cardiac chest pain (mean age 64 years, 51% women) responded to the Patient Health Questionnaire-15, Body Sensations Questionnaire, Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and one question regarding number of healthcare visits. The relationships between the psychological distress variables and healthcare visits were analysed using Structural Equation Modeling in two models representing patients with or without history of cardiac disease.
A total of 34% of the patients had previous cardiac disease. These patients were older, more males, and reported more comorbidities, psychological distress and healthcare visits. In both models, no direct association between depressive symptoms and healthcare use was found. However, depressive symptoms had an indirect effect on healthcare use, which was mediated by somatization, fear of body sensations, and cardiac anxiety, and this effect was significantly stronger in patients with history of cardiac disease. Additionally, all the direct and indirect effects between depressive symptoms, somatization, fear of body sensations, cardiac anxiety, and healthcare use were significantly stronger in patients with history of cardiac disease.
In patients with non-cardiac chest pain, in particular those with history of cardiac disease, psychological mechanisms play an important role for seeking healthcare. Development of interventions targeting psychological distress in these patients is warranted. Furthermore, there is also a need of more research to clarify as to whether such interventions should be tailored with regard to history of cardiac disease or not.
PubMed ID
29866125 View in PubMed
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The contribution of heart failure to sleep disturbances and depressive symptoms in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119220
Source
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2012 Sep;25(3):179-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Peter Johansson
Barbara Riegel
Erland Svensson
Anders Broström
Urban Alehagen
Ulf Dahlström
Tiny Jaarsma
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, S-58185 Linköping, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 2012 Sep;25(3):179-87
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Electrocardiography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Heart Failure - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the associations between physical symptoms, sleep disturbances, and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling elderly individuals, comparing persons with and without heart failure (HF).
A total of 613 older adults (mean age 78 years) underwent clinical and echocardiographic examinations. Questionnaires were used to evaluate sleep disturbances and depressive symptoms. A model was developed in those with HF (n = 107) and compared with those without HF (n = 506).
Cardiopulmonary symptoms (ie, dyspnea and nighttime palpitations) and pain had significant direct associations with sleep disturbances, which indirectly affected depressive symptoms. The model was essentially the same in those with and without HF except that the effect of sleep disturbances on depressive symptoms was stronger in those with HF (ß = 0.64 vs ß = 0.45, P = .006).
In community-dwelling older adults, regardless of their diagnosis, physical symptoms had a direct effect on sleep disturbances and an indirect effect on depressive symptoms.
PubMed ID
23124012 View in PubMed
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Determinants of global perceived health in community-dwelling elderly screened for heart failure and sleep-disordered breathing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100504
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010 Sep-Oct;25(5):E16-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter Johansson
Urban Alehagen
Erland Svensson
Eva Svanborg
Ulf Dahlström
Anders Broström
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. peter.johansson@aries.vokby.se
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010 Sep-Oct;25(5):E16-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depression - epidemiology
Dyspnea - epidemiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health status
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Quality of Life
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - epidemiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Systole
Abstract
The relationships between heart failure (HF), sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), insomnia, depressive symptoms, and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), as well as their relationship to Global Perceived Health (GPH) in an elderly community-dwelling population, have not been explored. Data from 331 community-dwelling elderly (71-87 years old) were collected by echocardiography, polygraphy, and specific questionnaires. Factor analyses and structural equation modeling were used to explore the relationships between HF, SDB, sleep, psychosocial factors, and GPH. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses derived a 5-factor model representing SDB, insomnia, systolic function, breathlessness/physical function, and psychosocial function. Structural equation modeling analyses were used to explore the relationships between the 5 factors and to GPH. Sleep-disordered breathing had a weak effect on systolic function, but no effects on any of the other factors or GPH were found. Psychosocial function and breathlessness/physical function directly affected GPH. Indirect effects on GPH, mediated by psychosocial function, were found for breathlessness/physical function and insomnia. Systolic function also had an indirect effect on GPH. The fact that SDB in the elderly has no obvious negative associations to sleep complaints or GPH does not exclude them from being adequately treated for SDB. However, the present study has shown that SDB, by means of self-rated sleep complaints and health-related quality of life, can be problematic to detect. Psychosocial function was the most important factor for perceived GPH as it had a direct effect, as well as mediated the factors breathlessness/physical function and insomnia effects, on GPH. This study indicates that interventions in clinical practice targeting psychosocial dysfunction, such as depressive symptoms, could help to improve GPH in the elderly with or without HF.
PubMed ID
20671565 View in PubMed
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