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Incidence and prevalence rates of personality disorders in Denmark-A register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263627
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;68(8):543-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Liselotte Pedersen
Erik Simonsen
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2014 Nov;68(8):543-8
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Personality disorders (PDs) are prevalent in about one in every 10 adults. Prior to the introduction of the ICD-10 in Denmark, the incidence rate for PD (including schizotypal) among psychiatric patients was approximately 12% and the prevalence rate 14%.
The aim of the present clinical epidemiology study is to investigate the use of ICD-10 PD as primary and secondary diagnoses in years 1995, 2000 and 2006, comorbid disorders and their relation to age and gender.
The study includes all adult patients admitted to any psychiatric hospital (inpatients and outpatients) in Denmark.
Both incidence and prevalence rates of PD diagnoses decrease over the study period. It is evident that all specific diagnoses significantly decrease or remain stable whereas the unspecified and mixed type significantly increases constituting up to 50% of diagnoses. Emotionally unstable PD stands out as the single most prevalent covering around one third of PD diagnoses. A decrease is found in the prevalence of patients receiving a PD diagnosis as a primary diagnosis, but an increase as a secondary diagnosis (most often as comorbid to depression or anxiety disorder). Differences are found in relation to gender and age.
PDs are among the most prevalent disorders; however, rates are decreasing in psychiatric settings. There seem to be a rather huge gap between clinical evaluation and research data on prevalence of PDs. Clinicians need more education and sufficient time for in-depth personality assessment of PDs in all patient groups.
PubMed ID
24520919 View in PubMed
Less detail

The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion: A comparative examination of three self-report forms in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278993
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Bo Bach
Jessica L Maples-Keller
Sune Bo
Erik Simonsen
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric qualities of all 3 PID-5 forms, simultaneously, based on a Danish sample (N = 1376) of 451 psychiatric outpatients and 925 community-dwelling participants. Scale reliability and factorial validity were satisfactory across all 3 PID-5 forms. The correlational profiles of the short and brief PID-5 forms with clinician-rated PD dimensions were nearly identical with that of the original PID-5 (rICC = .99 and .95, respectively). All 3 forms discriminated appropriately between psychiatric patients and community-dwelling individuals. This supports that all 3 PID-5 forms can be used to reliably and validly assess PD traits and provides initial support for the use of the abbreviated PID-5 forms in a European population. However, only the original 220-item form and the short 100-item form capture all 25 trait facets, and the brief 25-item form may be ideally limited to preliminary screening or situations with substantial time restrictions.
PubMed ID
26642229 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of duration of untreated psychosis among first-episode psychosis patients in Denmark: A nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295757
Source
Schizophr Res. 2018 02; 192:154-158
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Lene Halling Hastrup
Ulrik Helt Haahr
Jens Einar Jansen
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Region Zealand Psychiatry, Denmark. Electronic address: lhhs@regionsjaelland.dk.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2018 02; 192:154-158
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Awareness
Demography
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Intervention (Education)
Female
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Information on determinants of duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is still needed to inform campaigns targeting people with first episode psychosis (FEP). This nation-wide study analysed the association between demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, and geographic area), premorbid and illness-related factors (global functional level, substance misuse, and contact to police), healthcare factors (referral source and first FEP contact) and DUP.
The study population of 1266 patients aged 15-25years diagnosed with FEP (ICD10 F20.0-F20.99) was drawn from the Danish National Indicator Project during 2009-2011. The study population was combined with data from national administrative registers. A multinomial regression model was estimated to analyse the impact of demographic, premorbid and illness-related, and healthcare factors on DUP.
One third of the population had a DUP below 6months. DUP longer than 12months was associated with older age at onset, being female, having cannabis misuse, and living in peripheral municipalities. Being charged by the criminal authorities during one year before FEP was associated with a DUP over 6months.
DUP is related to a number of demographic, premorbid and healthcare factors. These findings suggest that future information campaigns should focus on increasing the awareness of early signs of psychosis not only among mental health professionals but also other professionals in contact with adolescents such as the police. It may also be useful to consider how to target information campaigns towards persons living in peripheral areas.
PubMed ID
28578812 View in PubMed
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Early identification of non-remission in first-episode psychosis in a two-year outcome study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141450
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Erik Simonsen
S. Friis
S. Opjordsmoen
E L Mortensen
U. Haahr
I. Melle
I. Joa
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Zealand Region Psychiatry Roskilde, Roskilde University and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. es@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Remission Induction
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify predictors of non-remission in first-episode, non-affective psychosis.
During 4 years, we recruited 301 patients consecutively. Information about first remission at 3 months was available for 299 and at 2 years for 293 cases. Symptomatic and social outcomes were assessed at 3 months, 1 and 2 years.
One hundred and twenty-nine patients (43%) remained psychotic at 3 months and 48 patients (16.4%) remained psychotic over 2 years. When we compared premorbid and baseline data for the three groups, the non-remitted (n = 48), remitted for
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):49421219270
PubMed ID
20722632 View in PubMed
Less detail

Treatment and violent behavior in persons with first episode psychosis during a 10-year prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259887
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Johannes Langeveld
Stål Bjørkly
Bjørn Auestad
Helene Barder
Julie Evensen
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Tor Ketil Larsen
Ingrid Melle
Stein Opjordsmoen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Vaglum
Thomas McGlashan
Svein Friis
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Crime
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Risk
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Violence
Young Adult
Abstract
First episode psychosis (FEP) patients have an increased risk for violence and criminal activity prior to initial treatment. However, little is known about the prevalence of criminality and acts of violence many years after implementation of treatment for a first episode psychosis.
To assess the prevalence of criminal and violent behaviors during a 10-year follow-up period after the debut of a first psychosis episode, and to identify early predictors and concomitant risk factors of violent behavior.
A prospective design was used with comprehensive assessments of criminal behavior, drug abuse, clinical, social and treatment variables at baseline, five, and 10-year follow-up. Additionally, threatening and violent behavior was assessed at 10-year follow-up. A clinical epidemiological sample of first-episode psychosis patients (n=178) was studied.
During the 10-year follow-up period, 20% of subjects had been apprehended or incarcerated. At 10-year follow-up, 15% of subjects had exposed others to threats or violence during the year before assessment. Illegal drug use at baseline and five-year follow-up, and a longer duration of psychotic symptoms were found to be predictive of violent behavior during the year preceding the 10-year follow-up.
After treatment initiation, the overall prevalence of violence in psychotic patients drops gradually to rates close to those of the general population. However, persistent illicit drug abuse is a serious risk factor for violent behavior, even long after the start of treatment. Achieving remission early and reducing substance abuse may contribute to a lower long-term risk for violent behavior in FEP patients.
PubMed ID
24837683 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279449
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2016
Author
Svein Friis
Ingrid Melle
Jan Olav Johannessen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Helene Eidsmo Barder
Julie Horgen Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Johannes Langeveld
Tor Ketil Larsen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Wiggen Vaglum
Thomas H McGlashan
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Date
Apr-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Social Skills
Time Factors
Abstract
Identifying patients at risk of poor outcome at an early stage of illness can aid in treatment planning. This study sought to create a best-fit statistical model of known baseline and early-course risk factors to predict time in psychosis during a ten-year follow-up period after a first psychotic episode.
Between 1997 and 2000, 301 patients with DSM-IV nonorganic, nonaffective first-episode psychosis were recruited consecutively from catchment area-based sectors in Norway and Denmark. Specialized mental health personnel evaluated patients at baseline, three months, and one, two, five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores =4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years, patients were also evaluated by their clinicians at least biweekly. Baseline and early-course predictors of long-term course were identified with linear mixed-model analyses.
Four variables provided significant, additive predictions of longer time in psychosis during the ten-year follow-up: deterioration in premorbid social functioning, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) of =26 weeks, core schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and no remission within three months.
First-episode psychosis patients should be followed carefully after the start of treatment. If symptoms do not remit within three months with adequate treatment, there is a considerable risk of a poor long-term outcome, particularly for patients with a deterioration in premorbid social functioning, a DUP of at least half a year, and a diagnosis within the core schizophrenia spectrum.
PubMed ID
26567932 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.