Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Empirical evidence for a four factor framework of personality disorder organization: multigroup confirmatory factor analysis of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III personality disorder scales across Belgian and Danish data samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145052
Source
J Pers Disord. 2010 Feb;24(1):128-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Gina Rossi
Ask Elklit
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Department of Clinical and Life Span Psychology, Brussels, Belgium. grossi@vub.ac.be
Source
J Pers Disord. 2010 Feb;24(1):128-50
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Belgium
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Tests
Psychometrics
Translations
Young Adult
Abstract
The factor structure of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (Millon, Millon, Davis, & Grossman, 2006) personality disorder scales was analyzed using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis on data obtained from a Danish (N = 2030) and a Belgian (N = 1210) sample. Two-, three-, and four factor models, a priori specified using structures found by Dyce, O'Connor, Parkins, and Janzen (1997), were fitted to the data. The best fitting model was a four factor structure (RMSEA = .066, GFI = .98, CFI = .93) with partially invariant factor loadings. The robustness of this four-factor model clearly supports the efforts to organize future personality disorder description in a four-factor framework by corroborating four domains that were predominant in dimensional models (Widiger & Simonsen, 2005): Factor 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively corresponded to emotional dysregulation versus stability, antagonism versus compliance, extraversion versus introversion, and constraint versus impulsivity.
PubMed ID
20205502 View in PubMed
Less detail

Third-wave cognitive therapy versus mentalisation-based treatment for major depressive disorder: a randomised clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266353
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(8):e004903
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Janus Christian Jakobsen
Christian Gluud
Mickey Kongerslev
Kirsten Aaskov Larsen
Per Sørensen
Per Winkel
Theis Lange
Ulf Søgaard
Erik Simonsen
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(8):e004903
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Denmark
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Theory of Mind
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the benefits and harms of third-wave cognitive therapy versus mentalisation-based therapy in a small sample of depressed participants.
The trial was conducted at an outpatient psychiatric clinic for non-psychotic patients in Roskilde, Denmark.
44 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder.
18 weeks of third-wave cognitive therapy (n=22) versus 18 weeks of mentalisation-based treatment (n=22).
The primary outcome was the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS) at end of treatment (18 weeks). Secondary outcomes were: remission (HDRS
Notes
Cites: Sci Eng Ethics. 2000 Jan;6(1):71-711273440
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2013 Sep;170(9):1041-5024030613
Cites: Psychopharmacol Bull. 1973 Jan;9(1):13-284682398
Cites: Br J Clin Psychol. 1984 May;23 ( Pt 2):93-96722384
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 1986 Feb;54(1):54-93958302
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1991 Sep;48(9):851-51929776
Cites: Stat Med. 1994 Jul 15-30;13(13-14):1341-52; discussion 1353-67973215
Cites: Int J Psychoanal. 1996 Jun;77 ( Pt 3):519-368818768
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1960 Feb;23:56-6214399272
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2004 Dec;161(12):2163-7715569884
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Jul;63(7):757-6616818865
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2008 Jan;61(1):64-7518083463
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2007 Dec;75(6):1000-518085916
Cites: PLoS Med. 2008 Feb;5(2):e4518303940
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2008 Aug;61(8):763-918411040
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2009 May;47(5):366-7319249017
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;166(12):1355-6419833787
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Mar 24;303(12):1180-720332404
Cites: J Consult Clin Psychol. 2010 Apr;78(2):169-8320350028
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2010 May;167(5):487-820439392
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jun 1;152(11):726-3220335313
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(6):CD00650720556767
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2010;10:9020920306
Cites: Epilepsy Behav. 2010 Nov;19(3):247-5420851055
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2011 Apr;130(1-2):138-4421093925
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(4):e1904421556370
Cites: Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr. 2011 Jun;79(6):330-921412690
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e2289021829664
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(12):e2829922174786
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2012 Mar;137(1-3):4-1421501877
Cites: Psychol Med. 2012 Jul;42(7):1343-5722051174
Cites: BMJ. 2012;344:e386322705814
Cites: Psychiatry Res. 2013 Dec 15;210(2):672-423850430
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2014;14:3424588900
Cites: BMC Psychiatry. 2012;12:23223253305
Cites: J Nerv Ment Dis. 2013 Mar;201(3):202-723407204
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Apr 14;165(16):1659-6212756823
PubMed ID
25138802 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term follow-up of the TIPS early detection in psychosis study: effects on 10-year outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126256
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;169(4):374-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Tor K Larsen
Bjørn Auestad
Julie Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Inge Joa
Jan O Johannesen
Johannes Langeveld
Ingrid Melle
Stein Opjordsmoen
Jan Ivar Rossberg
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Kjetil Sundet
Per Vaglum
Svein Friis
Thomas McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Stavanger University Hospital, Regional Center for Clinical Research in Psychosis, Health West, Norway. wenchetenvelden@me.com
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;169(4):374-80
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Early Diagnosis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis
Abstract
Early detection in first-episode psychosis confers advantages for negative, cognitive, and depressive symptoms after 1, 2, and 5 years, but longitudinal effects are unknown. The authors investigated the differences in symptoms and recovery after 10 years between regional health care sectors with and without a comprehensive program for the early detection of psychosis.
The authors evaluated 281 patients (early detection, N=141) 18 to 65 years old with a first episode of nonaffective psychosis between 1997 and 2001. Of these, 101 patients in the early-detection area and 73 patients in the usual-detection area were followed up at 10 years, and the authors compared their symptoms and recovery.
A significantly higher percentage of early-detection patients had recovered at the 10-year follow-up relative to usual-detection patients. This held true despite more severely ill patients dropping out of the study in the usual-detection area. Except for higher levels of excitative symptoms in the early-detection area, there were no symptom differences between the groups. Early-detection recovery rates were higher largely because of higher employment rates for patients in this group.
Early detection of first-episode psychosis appears to increase the chances of milder deficits and superior functioning. The mechanisms by which this strategy improves the long-term prognosis of psychosis remain speculative. Nevertheless, our findings over 10 years may indicate that a prognostic link exists between the timing of intervention and outcome that deserves additional study.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Sep;169(9):992; author reply 992-322952080
Comment In: Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;169(4):345-722476671
PubMed ID
22407080 View in PubMed
Less detail

Treatment and violent behavior in persons with first episode psychosis during a 10-year prospective follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259887
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Johannes Langeveld
Stål Bjørkly
Bjørn Auestad
Helene Barder
Julie Evensen
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Jan Olav Johannessen
Tor Ketil Larsen
Ingrid Melle
Stein Opjordsmoen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Vaglum
Thomas McGlashan
Svein Friis
Source
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul;156(2-3):272-6
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Crime
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Risk
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Violence
Young Adult
Abstract
First episode psychosis (FEP) patients have an increased risk for violence and criminal activity prior to initial treatment. However, little is known about the prevalence of criminality and acts of violence many years after implementation of treatment for a first episode psychosis.
To assess the prevalence of criminal and violent behaviors during a 10-year follow-up period after the debut of a first psychosis episode, and to identify early predictors and concomitant risk factors of violent behavior.
A prospective design was used with comprehensive assessments of criminal behavior, drug abuse, clinical, social and treatment variables at baseline, five, and 10-year follow-up. Additionally, threatening and violent behavior was assessed at 10-year follow-up. A clinical epidemiological sample of first-episode psychosis patients (n=178) was studied.
During the 10-year follow-up period, 20% of subjects had been apprehended or incarcerated. At 10-year follow-up, 15% of subjects had exposed others to threats or violence during the year before assessment. Illegal drug use at baseline and five-year follow-up, and a longer duration of psychotic symptoms were found to be predictive of violent behavior during the year preceding the 10-year follow-up.
After treatment initiation, the overall prevalence of violence in psychotic patients drops gradually to rates close to those of the general population. However, persistent illicit drug abuse is a serious risk factor for violent behavior, even long after the start of treatment. Achieving remission early and reducing substance abuse may contribute to a lower long-term risk for violent behavior in FEP patients.
PubMed ID
24837683 View in PubMed
Less detail