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Affect regulation and psychopathology in women with borderline personality disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118764
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Rune Andersen
Nina Timmerby
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk Forskningsenhed, Region Sjælland, Roskilde, Denmark. runan@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Nov;59(11):A4521
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Affective Symptoms - etiology
Aggression - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Denmark
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - etiology
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory - standards - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Psychopathology
Self Report
Self-Injurious Behavior - etiology
Translating
Abstract
Dysfunction in affect regulation is a prominent feature that grossly impairs behavioural and interpersonal domains of experience and underlies a great deal of the psychopathology in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, no study has yet been published that evaluates the psychometric properties of the translated Danish version of self-report measures sensitive to the different aspects and dimensions of dysfunction in affect regulation prevalent in BPD.
This study comprised a group of women diagnosed with BPD (n = 29) and a comparison group of healthy subjects (n = 29) who reported psychopathology and levels of affective instability, aggression, impulsivity and alexithymia by self-report measures.
Our results demonstrated that women with BPD have significant psychopathology and report significantly higher levels of dysfunction in separate components of affect regulation by self-report measures than the comparison group of healthy subjects. Our results also provided partial support for the psychometric appropriateness and clinical relevance of the translated Danish version of affect regulation measures.
The normative reference range indicated by our results makes the measures useful as a practical assessment tool.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
23171744 View in PubMed
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Reliability and Hierarchical Structure of DSM-5 Pathological Traits in a Danish Mixed Sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276683
Source
J Pers Disord. 2016 Feb;30(1):112-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sune Bo
Bo Bach
Erik Lykke Mortensen
Erik Simonsen
Source
J Pers Disord. 2016 Feb;30(1):112-29
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Language
Male
Personality
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sampling Studies
Self Report
Translations
Abstract
In this study we assessed the DSM-5 trait model in a large Danish sample (n = 1,119) with respect to reliability of the applied Danish version of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) self-report form by means of internal consistency and item discrimination. In addition, we tested whether the five-factor structure of the DSM-5 trait model can be replicated in a Danish independent sample using the PID-5 self-report form. Finally, we examined the hierarchical structure of DSM-5 traits. In terms of internal consistency and item discrimination, the applied PID-5 scales were generally found reliable and functional; our data resembled the five-factor structure of previous findings, and we identified a hierarchical structure from one to five factors that was conceptually reasonable and corresponded with existing findings. These results support the new DSM-5 trait model and suggest that it can be generalized to other languages and cultures.
PubMed ID
25905735 View in PubMed
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The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion: A comparative examination of three self-report forms in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278993
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Bo Bach
Jessica L Maples-Keller
Sune Bo
Erik Simonsen
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric qualities of all 3 PID-5 forms, simultaneously, based on a Danish sample (N = 1376) of 451 psychiatric outpatients and 925 community-dwelling participants. Scale reliability and factorial validity were satisfactory across all 3 PID-5 forms. The correlational profiles of the short and brief PID-5 forms with clinician-rated PD dimensions were nearly identical with that of the original PID-5 (rICC = .99 and .95, respectively). All 3 forms discriminated appropriately between psychiatric patients and community-dwelling individuals. This supports that all 3 PID-5 forms can be used to reliably and validly assess PD traits and provides initial support for the use of the abbreviated PID-5 forms in a European population. However, only the original 220-item form and the short 100-item form capture all 25 trait facets, and the brief 25-item form may be ideally limited to preliminary screening or situations with substantial time restrictions.
PubMed ID
26642229 View in PubMed
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