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Empirical evidence for a four factor framework of personality disorder organization: multigroup confirmatory factor analysis of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III personality disorder scales across Belgian and Danish data samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145052
Source
J Pers Disord. 2010 Feb;24(1):128-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Gina Rossi
Ask Elklit
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Department of Clinical and Life Span Psychology, Brussels, Belgium. grossi@vub.ac.be
Source
J Pers Disord. 2010 Feb;24(1):128-50
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Belgium
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Personality Tests
Psychometrics
Translations
Young Adult
Abstract
The factor structure of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (Millon, Millon, Davis, & Grossman, 2006) personality disorder scales was analyzed using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis on data obtained from a Danish (N = 2030) and a Belgian (N = 1210) sample. Two-, three-, and four factor models, a priori specified using structures found by Dyce, O'Connor, Parkins, and Janzen (1997), were fitted to the data. The best fitting model was a four factor structure (RMSEA = .066, GFI = .98, CFI = .93) with partially invariant factor loadings. The robustness of this four-factor model clearly supports the efforts to organize future personality disorder description in a four-factor framework by corroborating four domains that were predominant in dimensional models (Widiger & Simonsen, 2005): Factor 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively corresponded to emotional dysregulation versus stability, antagonism versus compliance, extraversion versus introversion, and constraint versus impulsivity.
PubMed ID
20205502 View in PubMed
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The alternative DSM-5 personality disorder traits criterion: A comparative examination of three self-report forms in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278993
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Bo Bach
Jessica L Maples-Keller
Sune Bo
Erik Simonsen
Source
Personal Disord. 2016 Apr;7(2):124-35
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - classification - epidemiology
Personality Inventory - standards
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013a) offers an alternative model for Personality Disorders (PDs) in Section III, which consists in part of a pathological personality traits criterion measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). The PID-5 selfreport instrument currently exists in the original 220-item form, a short 100-item form, and a brief 25-item form. For clinicians and researchers, the choice of a particular PID- 5 form depends on feasibility, but also reliability and validity. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychometric qualities of all 3 PID-5 forms, simultaneously, based on a Danish sample (N = 1376) of 451 psychiatric outpatients and 925 community-dwelling participants. Scale reliability and factorial validity were satisfactory across all 3 PID-5 forms. The correlational profiles of the short and brief PID-5 forms with clinician-rated PD dimensions were nearly identical with that of the original PID-5 (rICC = .99 and .95, respectively). All 3 forms discriminated appropriately between psychiatric patients and community-dwelling individuals. This supports that all 3 PID-5 forms can be used to reliably and validly assess PD traits and provides initial support for the use of the abbreviated PID-5 forms in a European population. However, only the original 220-item form and the short 100-item form capture all 25 trait facets, and the brief 25-item form may be ideally limited to preliminary screening or situations with substantial time restrictions.
PubMed ID
26642229 View in PubMed
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Determinants of duration of untreated psychosis among first-episode psychosis patients in Denmark: A nationwide register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295757
Source
Schizophr Res. 2018 02; 192:154-158
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Lene Halling Hastrup
Ulrik Helt Haahr
Jens Einar Jansen
Erik Simonsen
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Region Zealand Psychiatry, Denmark. Electronic address: lhhs@regionsjaelland.dk.
Source
Schizophr Res. 2018 02; 192:154-158
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Awareness
Demography
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Intervention (Education)
Female
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Information on determinants of duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is still needed to inform campaigns targeting people with first episode psychosis (FEP). This nation-wide study analysed the association between demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, and geographic area), premorbid and illness-related factors (global functional level, substance misuse, and contact to police), healthcare factors (referral source and first FEP contact) and DUP.
The study population of 1266 patients aged 15-25years diagnosed with FEP (ICD10 F20.0-F20.99) was drawn from the Danish National Indicator Project during 2009-2011. The study population was combined with data from national administrative registers. A multinomial regression model was estimated to analyse the impact of demographic, premorbid and illness-related, and healthcare factors on DUP.
One third of the population had a DUP below 6months. DUP longer than 12months was associated with older age at onset, being female, having cannabis misuse, and living in peripheral municipalities. Being charged by the criminal authorities during one year before FEP was associated with a DUP over 6months.
DUP is related to a number of demographic, premorbid and healthcare factors. These findings suggest that future information campaigns should focus on increasing the awareness of early signs of psychosis not only among mental health professionals but also other professionals in contact with adolescents such as the police. It may also be useful to consider how to target information campaigns towards persons living in peripheral areas.
PubMed ID
28578812 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of early intervention in first-episode psychosis: economic evaluation of a randomised controlled trial (the OPUS study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118731
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;202(1):35-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Lene Halling Hastrup
Christian Kronborg
Mette Bertelsen
Pia Jeppesen
Per Jorgensen
Lone Petersen
Anne Thorup
Erik Simonsen
Merete Nordentoft
Author Affiliation
Region Zealand, Psychiatric Research Unit, Roskilde, Denmark. lhhs@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;202(1):35-41
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Community Mental Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Diagnosis-Related Groups - economics
Early Medical Intervention - economics
Family Therapy - economics
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - economics
Patient Education as Topic - economics
Psychotic Disorders - economics - therapy
Schizophrenia - economics - therapy
Single-Blind Method
Socialization
Young Adult
Abstract
Information about the cost-effectiveness of early intervention programmes for first-episode psychosis is limited.
To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an intensive early-intervention programme (called OPUS) (trial registration NCT00157313) consisting of enriched assertive community treatment, psychoeducational family treatment and social skills training for individuals with first-episode psychosis compared with standard treatment.
An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis of a randomised controlled trial, adopting a public sector perspective was undertaken.
The mean total costs of OPUS over 5 years (€123,683, s.e. = 8970) were not significantly different from that of standard treatment (€148,751, s.e. = 13073). At 2-year follow-up the mean Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score in the OPUS group (55.16, s.d. = 15.15) was significantly higher than in standard treatment group (51.13, s.d. = 15.92). However, the mean GAF did not differ significantly between the groups at 5-year follow-up (55.35 (s.d. = 18.28) and 54.16 (s.d. = 18.41), respectively). Cost-effectiveness planes based on non-parametric bootstrapping showed that OPUS was less costly and more effective in 70% of the replications. For a willingness-to-pay up to €50,000 the probability that OPUS was cost-effective was more than 80%.
The incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed that there was a high probability of OPUS being cost-effective compared with standard treatment.
PubMed ID
23174515 View in PubMed
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Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269845
Source
Schizophr Res. 2015 Jun;165(1):52-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Anne Marie Trauelsen
Sarah Bendall
Jens Einar Jansen
Hanne-Grethe Lyse Nielsen
Marlene Buch Pedersen
Christopher Høier Trier
Ulrik H Haahr
Erik Simonsen
Source
Schizophr Res. 2015 Jun;165(1):52-9
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Child Abuse - psychology
Denmark
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Logistic Models
Male
Psychopathology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis.
Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non-clinical control persons matched by gender, age and parents' socio-economic status. Assessment included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and parts of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire.
Eighty-nine percent of the FEP group reported one or more adversities compared to 37% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all p
PubMed ID
25868932 View in PubMed
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Pathways to care for first-episode psychosis in an early detection healthcare sector: part of the Scandinavian TIPS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70615
Source
Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2005 Aug;48:s24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Jan Olav Johannessen
Tor K Larsen
Inge Joa
Ingrid Melle
Svein Friis
Stein Opjordsmoen
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Vaglum
Thomas H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, General Hospital of Rogaland, Armauer Hanssens vei 20, 4000 Stavanger, Norway. jojo@sir.no
Source
Br J Psychiatry Suppl. 2005 Aug;48:s24-8
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Critical Pathways - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Early detection programmes aim to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) by public education and by prompt access to treatment via active outreach detection teams. AIMS: To determine whether those with first-episode psychosis in an early detection healthcare area with existing referral channels differ from those who access care via detection teams. METHOD: Those with first-episode psychosis recruited via detection teams were compared with those accessing treatment via conventional channels, at baseline and after 3 months of acute treatment. RESULTS: Patients recruited via detection teams are younger males with a longer DUP, a less dramatic symptom picture and better functioning; however they recover more slowly, and have more symptoms at 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: After establishing low threshold active case-seeking detection teams, we found clear differences between those patients entering treatment via detection teams v. those obtaining treatment via the usual channels. Such profiling may be informative for early detection service development.
PubMed ID
16055803 View in PubMed
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Early identification of non-remission in first-episode psychosis in a two-year outcome study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141450
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Erik Simonsen
S. Friis
S. Opjordsmoen
E L Mortensen
U. Haahr
I. Melle
I. Joa
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Zealand Region Psychiatry Roskilde, Roskilde University and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. es@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Remission Induction
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify predictors of non-remission in first-episode, non-affective psychosis.
During 4 years, we recruited 301 patients consecutively. Information about first remission at 3 months was available for 299 and at 2 years for 293 cases. Symptomatic and social outcomes were assessed at 3 months, 1 and 2 years.
One hundred and twenty-nine patients (43%) remained psychotic at 3 months and 48 patients (16.4%) remained psychotic over 2 years. When we compared premorbid and baseline data for the three groups, the non-remitted (n = 48), remitted for
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):49421219270
PubMed ID
20722632 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.