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Gender differences among spouses of surgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175350
Source
Am J Surg. 2005 Apr;189(4):435-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Lillian S Kao
Erik B Wilson
Kimberly D Anderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Texas-Houston Medical School, 5656 Kelley Street, Suite 30S62008, Houston, TX 77026, USA. Lillian.S.Kao@uth.tmc.edu
Source
Am J Surg. 2005 Apr;189(4):435-40
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Data Collection
Decision Making
Female
General Surgery
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Probability
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Spouses
United States
Abstract
The goal of this study was to identify whether gender differences exist regarding the degree of spousal support for, satisfaction with, and perception of surgeons' careers.
A survey was performed of spouses of academic surgeons in the United States and Canada.
Female respondents were significantly less likely to work outside of the home and were significantly more likely to be the major decision-makers at home. They were less likely to credit their surgeon spouses with contributing to household duties and childcare. If both spouses worked outside of the home, the female spouse was still more likely to be the major decision maker. Overall, male and female respondents rated their role in and their satisfaction with their spouses' career choices similarly.
Male and female spouses contribute equally to the career choices of their surgeon spouses. However, female spouses, both surgeon and nonsurgeon, are more likely to make the majority of the decisions at home and contributions to household care.
PubMed ID
15820456 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceptions and predictors of surgeon satisfaction: a survey of spouses of academic surgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175127
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2005 May;200(5):684-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Lillian S Kao
Erik B Wilson
Kimberly D Anderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2005 May;200(5):684-90
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Choice
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
General Surgery
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Spouses - psychology
Statistics, nonparametric
United States
Abstract
Although several studies have addressed the role of spouses in physicians' career choices, there is limited data about spousal perception of surgeons' careers after training. This study examined satisfaction with surgeons' careers and potential contributing factors from a spousal standpoint.
A survey of spouses of academic surgeons in 38 participating departments was conducted. Questions included demographic information and perceptions of career satisfaction and contributing factors. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test, and chi-square or Fisher's exact test.
Three hundred seventy-nine surveys (27%) were returned, with the majority (81%) perceiving their surgeon spouses to be satisfied. Contributing factors to surgeon dissatisfaction included: work hours/call (42%); practice limitations (18%); reimbursement/income (12%); and malpractice/insurance (7%). Dissatisfied surgeons, as perceived by their spouses, did not differ from satisfied surgeons in terms of work hours, income expectations, geographic desirability, or home involvement. On the other hand, predictors of dissatisfied spouses included lack of input into career decisions, less satisfaction with location, and lack of their surgeon spouses' participation in household and child-care activities.
There are many positive and negative aspects to being an academic surgeon. Yet, despite the time commitment, work hours per se do not appear to contribute to either surgeon or spousal satisfaction. Spousal satisfaction is dependent on surgeon contribution to household and childcare activities. Despite the multiple potential detractors from an academic surgical career, most surgeons, as perceived by their spouses, would not have chosen differently and are satisfied with their career choices.
PubMed ID
15848358 View in PubMed
Less detail