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Acute impacts of extreme temperature exposure on emergency room admissions related to mental and behavior disorders in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256377
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Xiang Wang
Eric Lavigne
Hélène Ouellette-kuntz
Bingshu E Chen
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Environmental Issues Division, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Canada. Electronic address: wanqus@gmail.com.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cities
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nonlinear Dynamics
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extreme ambient temperature on hospital emergency room visits (ER) related to mental and behavioral illnesses in Toronto, Canada.
A time series study was conducted using health and climatic data from 2002 to 2010 in Toronto, Canada. Relative risks (RRs) for increases in emergency room (ER) visits were estimated for specific mental and behavioral diseases (MBD) after exposure to hot and cold temperatures while using the 50th percentile of the daily mean temperature as reference. Poisson regression models using a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) were used. We adjusted for the effects of seasonality, humidity, day-of-the-week and outdoor air pollutants.
We found a strong association between MBD ER visits and mean daily temperature at 28?C. The association was strongest within a period of 0-4 days for exposure to hot temperatures. A 29% (RR=1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.53) increase in MBD ER vists was observed over a cumulative period of 7 days after exposure to high ambient temperature (99th percentile vs. 50th percentile). Similar associations were reported for schizophrenia, mood, and neurotic disorers. No significant associations with cold temperatures were reported.
The ecological nature and the fact that only one city was investigated.
Our findings suggest that extreme temperature poses a risk to the health and wellbeing for individuals with mental and behavior illnesses. Patient management and education may need to be improved as extreme temperatures may become more prevalent with climate change.
PubMed ID
24332428 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for asthma in Windsor, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126951
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eric Lavigne
Paul J Villeneuve
Sabit Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Environmental Issues Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON. eric.lavigne@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jan-Feb;103(1):4-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Particle Size
Risk
Seasons
Abstract
The city of Windsor is recognized to have poor air quality in comparison with other Canadian cities. However, relatively few studies have evaluated associations between day-to-day fluctuations in air pollution levels and respiratory health in Windsor. In this study, we examined associations between short-term changes in ambient air pollution and emergency department (ED) visits for asthma in Windsor.
A time-stratified case-crossover design was applied to 3,728 ED visits for asthma that occurred in Windsor area hospitals between 2002 and 2009. Daily air pollution levels for the region were estimated using Environment Canada's network of fixed-site monitors. ED visits were identified through the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS). Odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression, and were adjusted for the confounding influence of daily number of influenza ED visits and weather variables using natural spline functions.
Statistically significant associations were observed between ambient air pollution levels and ED visits for asthma in Windsor. Effects were particularly pronounced among children 2 to 14 years of age between April and September. Namely, increases in the interquartile range with 1-day lagged exposure to SO2, NO2 and CO levels were associated with increased risks of an asthma visit of 19%, 25% and 36%, respectively.
Exposure in Windsor to ambient air pollution increases the risk of ED visits for asthma, particularly among children.
PubMed ID
22338320 View in PubMed
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Canadian breast implant cohort: extended follow-up of cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125120
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Oct 1;131(7):E1148-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2012
Author
Sai Yi Pan
Eric Lavigne
Eric J Holowaty
Paul J Villeneuve
Lin Xie
Howard Morrison
Jacques Brisson
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Oct 1;131(7):E1148-57
Date
Oct-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Implants - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Young Adult
Abstract
Cosmetic breast implants are not associated with increased breast cancer incidence, but variations of risk according to implant characteristics are still poorly understood. As well, the assessment of cancer risk for sites other than breast needs to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to fill these research gaps. This study presents an extended analysis of 10 more years of follow-up of a large Canadian cohort of women who received either cosmetic breast implants (n = 24,558) or other cosmetic surgery (15,893). Over 70% of the implant cohort was followed for over 20 years. Cancer incidence among implant women was compared to those of controls using multivariate Poisson models and the general female population using the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Women with breast implants had reduced rates of breast and endometrial cancers compared to other surgery women. Subglandular implants were associated to a reduced rate of breast cancer compared to submuscular implants [incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.63-0.96] and this reduction persisted over time. We observed a sevenfold increased rate (IRR = 7.36, 95% CI = 1.86-29.12) of breast cancer in the first 5 years after the date of surgery for polyurethane-coated subglandular implant women but this IRR decreased progressively over time (p value for trend = 0.02). We also observed no increased risk of rarer forms of cancer among augmented women. A reduction in breast cancer incidence was observed for women with subglandular implants relative to women with submuscular implants. Possible increase of breast cancer incidence shortly after breast augmentation with polyurethane implants needs to be verified.
PubMed ID
22514048 View in PubMed
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Do breast implants adversely affect prognosis among those subsequently diagnosed with breast cancer? Findings from an extended follow-up of a Canadian cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122078
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Oct;21(10):1868-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Eric Lavigne
Eric J Holowaty
Sai Yi Pan
Lin Xie
Paul J Villeneuve
Howard Morrison
Jacques Brisson
Author Affiliation
Unité de Recherche en Santé des Populations, URESP, Centre de recherche FRSQ du Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec and Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. elavigne@uresp.ulaval.ca
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 Oct;21(10):1868-76
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Implants - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
Cosmetic breast implants may impair the ability to detect breast cancers. The aims of this study were to examine whether implants and implant characteristics are associated with more advanced breast tumors at diagnosis and poorer survival.
Study population includes all invasive breast cancer cases diagnosed during follow-up of the large Canadian Breast Implant Cohort. A total of 409 women with cosmetic breast implants and 444 women with other cosmetic surgery were diagnosed with breast cancer. These women were compared for stage at diagnosis using multinomial logistic regression models. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for breast cancer-specific mortality analyses. Comparisons were also conducted according to implant characteristics.
Compared with women with other cosmetic surgery, those with cosmetic breast implants had at later stage breast cancer diagnosis (OR of having stage III/IV vs. stage I at diagnosis: 3.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.81-5.10; P
PubMed ID
22850806 View in PubMed
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Extreme ambient temperatures and cardiorespiratory emergency room visits: assessing risk by comorbid health conditions in a time series study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257201
Source
Environ Health. 2014;13(1):5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Eric Lavigne
Antonio Gasparrini
Xiang Wang
Hong Chen
Abderrahmane Yagouti
Manon D Fleury
Sabit Cakmak
Author Affiliation
Environmental Issues Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada. eric.lavigne@phac-aspc.gc.ca.
Source
Environ Health. 2014;13(1):5
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Humans
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Risk
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Abstract
Extreme ambient temperatures are an increasing public health concern. The aim of this study was to assess if persons with comorbid health conditions were at increased risk of adverse cardiorespiratory morbidity during temperature extremes.
A time series study design was applied to 292,666 and 562,738 emergency room (ER) visits for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, respectively, that occurred in Toronto area hospitals between April 1st 2002 and March 31st 2010. Subgroups of persons with comorbid health conditions were identified. Relative risks (RRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a Poisson regression model with distributed lag non-linear model, and were adjusted for the confounding influence of seasonality, relative humidity, day-of-the-week, outdoor air pollutants and daily influenza ER visits. Effect modification by comorbid health conditions was tested using the relative effect modification (REM) index.
Stronger associations of cardiovascular disease ER visits were observed for persons with diabetes compared to persons without diabetes (REM = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.01 - 1.27) with exposure to the cumulative short term effect of extreme hot temperatures (i.e. 99th percentile of temperature distribution vs. 75th percentile). Effect modification was also found for comorbid respiratory disease (REM = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.02 - 1.44) and cancer (REM = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.02 - 1.49) on respiratory disease ER visits during short term hot temperature episodes. The effect of extreme cold temperatures (i.e. 1st percentile of temperature distribution vs. 25th percentile) on cardiovascular disease ER visits were stronger for individuals with comorbid cardiac diseases (REM = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.06 - 2.23) and kidney diseases (REM = 2.43; 95% CI: 1.59 - 8.83) compared to those without these conditions when cumulated over a two-week period.
The identification of those most susceptible to temperature extremes is important for public health officials to implement adaptation measures to manage the impact of extreme temperatures on population health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24484632 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial work environment, interpersonal violence at work and psychotropic drug use among correctional officers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146355
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2010 Mar-Apr;33(2):122-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eric Lavigne
Renée Bourbonnais
Author Affiliation
Laval University, Canada. eric.lavigne@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2010 Mar-Apr;33(2):122-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Prisons
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Quebec
Questionnaires
Violence
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of psychotropic drug use, measure the association between job strain, extrinsic efforts-rewards ratio, interpersonal violence and psychotropic drug use among officers working in correctional facilities in the province of Quebec in Canada. This study also examined if interpersonal violence at work is an intermediate factor in the causal chain between psychosocial risk factors at work and psychotropic drug use. A cross-sectional study was performed which included 1288 Quebec correctional officers. The participants answered a self-administered questionnaire in 2007 assessing psychological demands, decision latitude, extrinsic efforts, rewards, overcommitment, intimidation, psychological harassment, social support in the actual job, psychotropic drug use during the month preceding the questionnaire and sociodemographic variables. Binomial regressions were performed for the principal associations and a bootstrap analysis was performed in order to evaluate interpersonal violence as an intermediate factor between psychosocial risk factors at work and psychotropic drug use. The prevalence of psychotropic drug use among correctional officers was 14.7%. The prevalence ratios (PR) for the associations between job strain, extrinsic efforts-rewards ratio, social support from colleagues and supervisors, intimidation and psychological harassment adjusted for age and gender were respectively 1.4 (95% CI 0.9-2.2), 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.2), 1.7 (95% CI 1.3-2.3), 1.4 (95% CI 0.9-2.4) and 1.5 (95% CI 1.1-2.0). The value of the indirect effect evaluating psychological harassment as an intermediate factor was not statistically significant (value=0.0087, 95% CI -0.0033 to 0.0207). An imbalanced extrinsic efforts-rewards ratio, low social support from colleagues and supervisors and psychological harassment at work were separately associated with psychotropic drug use among correctional officers. Psychological harassment was not found to be an intermediate factor.
PubMed ID
20042239 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.