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Cannabis use is associated with 3years earlier onset of schizophrenia spectrum disorder in a naturalistic, multi-site sample (N=1119).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277445
Source
Schizophr Res. 2016 Jan;170(1):217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Siri Helle
Petter Andreas Ringen
Ingrid Melle
Tor-Ketil Larsen
Rolf Gjestad
Erik Johnsen
Trine Vik Lagerberg
Ole A Andreassen
Rune Andreas Kroken
Inge Joa
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Else-Marie Løberg
Source
Schizophr Res. 2016 Jan;170(1):217-21
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Cannabis
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - complications - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Schizophrenia - complications - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and substance use may have an earlier onset of illness compared to those without substance use. Most previous studies have, however, too small samples to control for confounding variables and the effect of specific types of substances. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between substance use and age at onset, in addition to the influence of possible confounders and specific substances, in a large and heterogeneous multisite sample of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.
The patients (N=1119) were recruited from catchment areas in Oslo, Stavanger and Bergen, Norway, diagnosed according to DSM-IV and screened for substance use history. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between substance use and age at onset of illness.
Patients with substance use (n=627) had about 3years earlier age at onset (23.0years; SD 7.1) than the abstinent group (n=492; 25.9years; SD 9.7). Only cannabis use was statistically significantly related to earlier age at onset. Gender or family history of psychosis did not influence the results.
Cannabis use is associated with 3years earlier onset of psychosis.
PubMed ID
26682958 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of auditory hallucinations in Norwegian adolescents: results from a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278682
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Aug;56(4):391-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Kristiina Kompus
Else-Marie Løberg
Maj-Britt Posserud
Astri Johansen Lundervold
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Aug;56(4):391-6
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Hallucinations - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing the prevalence and characteristics of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in adolescents is important for estimations of need for mental health care and assessment of psychosis risk. In this report we assess the prevalence of AVH in a population-based sample of 16-19 years old Norwegian adolescents (n = 9,646, 46.4% male) using two items assessing AVH (from the extended Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale). The prevalence of hearing a voice speaking thoughts aloud was 10.6%. The prevalence of being troubled by voices was 5.3%, showing that negative emotionality about AVH is less frequent than the experience of hearing voices. Female respondents had slightly increased risk for being troubled by voices than males (odds ratio = 1.3), while age did not modulate prevalence. This AVH prevalence is in line with earlier reports in smaller samples of adolescents and indicates that AVH are not uncommon in this period of life. Further longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the value of AVH in predicting psychiatric disorder.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25968251 View in PubMed
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