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Access to abortion: what women want from abortion services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157583
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Apr;30(4):327-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Supna Sandhu
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Apr;30(4):327-31
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Therapeutic
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Data Collection
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Physician-Patient Relations
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Whether Canadian physicians can refuse to refer women for abortion and whether private clinics can charge for abortions are matters of controversy. We sought to identify barriers to access for women seeking therapeutic abortion and to have them identify what they considered to be most important about access to abortion services.
Women presenting for abortion over a two-month period at two free-standing abortion clinics, one publicly funded and the other private, were invited to participate in the study. Phase I of the study involved administration of a questionnaire seeking information about demographics, perceived barriers to access to abortion, and what the women wanted from abortion services. Phase II involved semi-structured interviews of a convenience sample of women to record their responses to questions about access. Responses from Phase I questionnaires were compared between the two clinics, and qualitative analysis was performed on the interview responses.
Of 423 eligible women, 402 completed questionnaires, and of 45 women approached, 39 completed interviews satisfactorily. Women received information about abortion services from their physicians (60.0%), the Internet (14.8%), a telephone directory (7.8%), friends or family (5.3%), or other sources (12.3%). Many had negative experiences in gaining access. The most important issue regarding access was the long wait time; the second most important issue was difficulty in making appointments. In the private clinic, 85% of the women said they were willing to pay for shorter wait times, compared with 43.5% in the public clinic.
Physicians who failed to refer patients for abortion or provide information about obtaining an abortion caused distress and impeded access for a significant minority of women requesting an abortion. Management of abortion services should be prioritized to reflect what women want: particularly decreased wait times for abortion and greater ease and convenience in booking appointments. Since many women are willing to pay for services in order to have an abortion within one week, this option should be considered by policy makers.
PubMed ID
18430382 View in PubMed
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Barriers to use of oral contraceptives in ethnic Chinese women presenting for abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190760
Source
Contraception. 2002 Feb;65(2):159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Lorna Sent
Sharon Fong
Jessica Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. ewiebe@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Contraception. 2002 Feb;65(2):159-63
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
China - ethnology
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infertility, Female - etiology
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to the use of oral contraceptives by ethnic Chinese women presenting for abortion. Using a qualitative descriptive study design, 40 ethnic Chinese women presenting for abortion were recruited. Data were collected in semi-structured interviews by one interviewer who is fluent in English, Mandarin, and Cantonese. Transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient themes. The attitudes toward oral contraceptives were mostly negative. The most common fears were about weight gain, permanent infertility, and being considered "bad" (promiscuous). These mostly negative attitudes toward oral contraceptives appear to be barriers to their use.
PubMed ID
11927119 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparing continuation rates and side effects of hormonal contraceptives in East Asian and Caucasian women after abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154651
Source
Contraception. 2008 Nov;78(5):405-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Konia Trouton
Zhe Amy Fang
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1H9. ellenwiebe@yahoo.ca
Source
Contraception. 2008 Nov;78(5):405-8
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Cohort Studies
Contraception - adverse effects - utilization
Contraceptive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Contraceptives, Postcoital, Hormonal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Patient Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine whether East Asian women had more side effects and a higher discontinuation rate than Caucasian women when choosing to use hormonal contraceptives.
This was an observational cohort study of usual care using questionnaires for 2 months after being given hormonal contraceptives following an abortion in Vancouver, Canada.
In the first month, 73 (64.4%) of the 110 East Asian and 86 (80.4%) of the 107 Caucasian women took any of the sample provided (p=.020). In the second month, 52 (47.3%) of the East Asian and 62 (57%) of the Caucasian women used the prescription to buy and take their hormonal contraception (p=.12). Total side effects were similar, but there was more nausea in the East Asian women (23.3% vs. 8.1%) (p=.03) and more acne in the Caucasian women (8.2% vs. 20.9%) (p=.05).
There may be both physiological and cultural differences leading East Asian women to use less hormonal contraception.
PubMed ID
18929738 View in PubMed
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Does using tampons or menstrual cups increase early IUD expulsion rates?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125645
Source
Contraception. 2012 Aug;86(2):119-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Konia J Trouton
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada. ellenwiebe@gmail.com
Source
Contraception. 2012 Aug;86(2):119-21
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Contraceptive Agents, Female
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intrauterine Device Expulsion - etiology
Intrauterine Devices, Medicated
Levonorgestrel
Medical Records
Menstrual Hygiene Products - adverse effects
Reproductive Health Services
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Many intrauterine device (IUD) users utilize intravaginal menstrual cups or tampons during menses, but no studies have investigated the impact this practice may have on IUD expulsions.
Retrospective chart survey.
Of the 930 women having IUDs placed and reporting menstrual protection, 10.3% (96) used menstrual cups, 74.2% (690) used tampons, and 43.2% (402) used pads (many women reported using more than one method). In the 743 women with adequate follow-up information, there was a full or partial expulsion (i.e., part of the IUD in the cervical canal) rate of 2.5% (27) during the first 6 weeks after insertion. There was no difference in the women using cups, tampons or pads (confidence intervals overlap).
From this study, there is no evidence that women who report using menstrual cups or tampons for menstrual protection had higher rates of early IUD expulsion.
PubMed ID
22464406 View in PubMed
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Ethnic Chinese women's perceptions about condoms, withdrawal and rhythm methods of birth control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179995
Source
Contraception. 2004 Jun;69(6):493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Patricia A Janssen
Angela Henderson
Iris Fung
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, 1013-750 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1H9 Canada. ewiebe@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Contraception. 2004 Jun;69(6):493-6
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia
Contraception - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Abstract
To gain a better understanding of ethnic Chinese women's perceptions and experiences of using barrier and rhythm methods of contraception in order to improve contraceptive counseling at abortion clinics.
Qualitative descriptive study.
Urban abortion clinic.
Forty ethnic Chinese women presenting for abortion.
Data were collected in semi-structured interviews by one interviewer who is fluent in English, Mandarin and Cantonese. Transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient themes.
All of the women interviewed had used condoms (none with spermicide), 20 had used rhythm and 17 withdrawal, usually a combination of two or three of these methods. Many women noted that these methods are under male control and talked about the difficulty negotiating their use with partners. The majority of women using rhythm were unable to correctly identify "safe periods."
PubMed ID
15157795 View in PubMed
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Misperceptions about the risks of abortion in women presenting for abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104787
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2014 Mar;36(3):223-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Lisa Littman
Janusz Kaczorowski
Erin L Moshier
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2014 Mar;36(3):223-30
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adult
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Reproductive health
Abstract
Misinformation about the risks and sequelae of abortion is widespread. The purpose of this study was to examine whether women having an abortion who believe that there should be restrictions to abortion (i.e., that some other women should not be allowed to have an abortion) also believe this misinformation about the health risks associated with abortion.
We carried out a cross-sectional survey of women presenting consecutively for an abortion at an urban abortion clinic in Vancouver, British Columbia, between February and September 2012.
Of 1008 women presenting for abortion, 978 completed questionnaires (97% response rate), and 333 of these (34%) favoured abortion restrictions. More women who favoured restrictions believed that the health risk of an abortion was the same as or greater than the health risk of childbirth (84.2% vs. 65.6%, P
PubMed ID
24612891 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of telemedicine for providing medical abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105700
Source
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2014 Feb;124(2):177-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Electronic address: ellenwiebe@gmail.com.
Source
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2014 Feb;124(2):177-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents - administration & dosage
Abortion, Induced - methods
Adult
British Columbia
Chorionic Gonadotropin - urine
Female
Humans
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Misoprostol - administration & dosage
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Telemedicine
PubMed ID
24332519 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2012 May;117(2):185-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Family Practice, Vancouver, Canada. ellenwiebe@gmail.com
Source
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2012 May;117(2):185-6
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Contraception - methods
Female
Humans
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
22374107 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.