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Age at menarche and pregnancy-related pelvic pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115553
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2013 May;39(5):1037-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Mette J Kirkeby
Karin Biering
Jørn Olsen
Mette Juhl
Ellen A Nohr
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Herning Regional Hospital, Herning, Denmark.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2013 May;39(5):1037-44
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Menarche
Pelvic Pain - epidemiology - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
Menarcheal age is a predictor of several complications related to pregnancy and diseases later in life. We aimed to study if menarcheal age is a risk factor for pregnancy-related pelvic pain.
A nested case-control study was conducted within the Danish National Birth Cohort, a cohort of pregnant women, recruited during 1996-2002, and their children. In the second trimester of pregnancy the women provided information about age at menarche and potential confounders. Selection of cases (n?=?2227) was based on self-reported pelvic pain during pregnancy from an interview done 6 months post-partum. The controls (n?=?2588) were randomly selected among women who did not report pelvic pain. We used logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (OR) for pregnancy-related pelvic pain according to age at menarche.
In the cohort, 18.5% of all pregnant women reported pregnancy-related pelvic pain. Compared to women who were 12-14 years old at menarche, the adjusted OR for overall pelvic pain were 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-1.7) in women 11 years or younger and 0.8 (95%CI 0.6-0.9) in women 15 years or older. The corresponding adjusted OR for severe pelvic pain were 1.6 (95%CI 1.3-2.0) and 0.7 (95%CI 0.6-0.9). When age was analyzed as a continuous variable, the odds for overall and severe pelvic pain decreased with 14% and 16%, respectively, for each increasing year.
The risk of pregnancy-related pelvic pain decreased with increasing menarcheal age in an 'exposure-response' pattern. A low menarcheal age is a risk indicator and may be a risk factor for pregnancy-related pelvic pain.
PubMed ID
23496415 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and risk of autoimmune diseases: a study within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260519
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun;43(3):843-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Maria C Harpsøe
Saima Basit
Mikael Andersson
Nete M Nielsen
Morten Frisch
Jan Wohlfahrt
Ellen A Nohr
Allan Linneberg
Tine Jess
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Jun;43(3):843-55
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A possible aetiological link between obesity and certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) has been suggested. We investigated the associations between body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and 43 ADs.
75,008 women participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed during a median time of 11 years. Diagnoses on ADs were retrieved from the Danish National Patient Register. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated adjusting for potential confounders (smoking, alcohol, parity and socio-occupational status).
During follow-up, 2430 women (3.2%) developed a total of 2607 new-onset ADs. Risk of any autoimmune disease was increased in obese women (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.46) compared with normal weight women (18.5-=25 kg/m2). Obese women (BMI=30 kg/m2) were at increased risk of sarcoidosis (HR 3.59; 95% CI, 2.31 to 5.57) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (HR 2.67; 95% CI, 1.71 to 4.17). Risk of dermatitis herpetiformis increased by 14% (95% CI, 1% to 30%) per BMI unit. Conversely, risk of celiac disease and Raynaud's phenomenon decreased by 7% (95% CI, 1% to 13%) and 12% (95% CI, 4% to 19%) per BMI unit, respectively. Further associations between BMI and risk of psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease were suggested.
BMI was found to be associated with several Ads. This was most pronounced between obesity and risk of sarcoidosis and and risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus. These novel findings need confirmation and the possible role of adipose tissue-derived immunological changes in the development of autoimmune reactions needs consideration.
PubMed ID
24609069 View in PubMed
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Body Mass Index and Risk of Infections Among Women in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283057
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Jun 01;183(11):1008-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2016
Author
Maria C Harpsøe
Nete M Nielsen
Nina Friis-Møller
Mikael Andersson
Jan Wohlfahrt
Allan Linneberg
Ellen A Nohr
Tine Jess
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Jun 01;183(11):1008-17
Date
Jun-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Communicable Diseases - drug therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Incidence
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Risk factors
Skin Diseases, Infectious - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Thinness - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated the possible association between body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) and hospitalization or treatment for acute infection in a prospective cohort study. We linked 75,001 women enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort from 1996 to 2002, who had information on BMI and a broad range of confounders, to data on infectious diseases and use of antimicrobial agents from the National Patient Register and the Danish Prescription Register. Associations were tested using Cox proportional hazards models. During 12 years of follow-up, we observed a U-shaped association between baseline BMI and later hospitalization for 1) any infectious disease and 2) infections of the respiratory tract, whereas a dose-response relationship was seen for skin infections. The most pronounced associations were seen for acute upper respiratory infections at multiple and unspecified sites (underweight (BMI
PubMed ID
27188940 View in PubMed
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Determinants of serum levels of perfluorinated alkyl acids in Danish pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284756
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2016 Nov;219(8):867-875
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Christian Bjerregaard-Olesen
Cathrine C Bach
Manhai Long
Mandana Ghisari
Bodil H Bech
Ellen A Nohr
Tine B Henriksen
Jørn Olsen
Eva C Bonefeld-Jørgensen
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2016 Nov;219(8):867-875
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - blood
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Body mass index
Denmark
Educational Status
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy - blood
Smoking - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Humans are exposed to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) from food, drinking water, air, dust, and consumer products. PFAAs are persistent and bio-accumulative. In the present study, we aimed to establish how the serum levels of PFAAs differ according to age, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), previous miscarriages, educational level, country of birth, smoking, and alcohol intake. We included 1438 Danish pregnant nulliparous women from the Aarhus Birth Cohort. The women gave a blood serum sample between week 11 and 13 of pregnancy. Sixteen PFAAs were extracted from serum using solid phase extraction and analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to determine the associations between individual characteristics of the women and their levels of seven PFAAs that were detected in at least 50% of the samples. The total concentration of the PFAAs (?PFAA) was higher in older women. On average, normal weight women had a higher ?PFAA level than underweight, overweight, and obese women. Higher levels were also observed for women without previous miscarriages, women with a high educational level, women born in Denmark (as opposed to women born elsewhere but currently living in Denmark), non-smokers, and women who consumed alcohol before or during pregnancy. These associations were similar for all the studied PFAAs, although the levels of perfluoroundecanoic acid varied more across the categories of age, BMI, education, smoking, and alcohol consumption than any other PFAAs measured.
PubMed ID
27451073 View in PubMed
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Diseases in children born to mothers with preeclampsia: a population-based sibling cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100378
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Sep 25;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2010
Author
Chun S Wu
Ellen A Nohr
Bodil H Bech
Mogens Vestergaard
Janet M Catov
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Sep 25;
Date
Sep-25-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE:: We previously reported associations between preeclampsia and the occurrence of metabolic and respiratory diseases in the offspring. In this article we examine whether the associations were due to preeclampsia or factors leading to preeclampsia. STUDY DESIGN:: From 1978 through 2004, we identified 22,264 discordant sib-pairs in Denmark according to prenatal exposure to preeclampsia. Exposed children were compared to their unexposed siblings by using stratified Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for metabolic and respiratory diseases. RESULTS:: Exposed children had rather similar risks for metabolic disorders compared to their unexposed siblings. However, when the second child within each sib-pair was exposed, this child had an increased risk for respiratory diseases (hazard ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.01). CONCLUSION:: Factors leading to preeclampsia may shape susceptibility to metabolic or respiratory diseases in the offspring but a programming effect on respiratory diseases induced by preeclampsia cannot be ruled out.
PubMed ID
20875632 View in PubMed
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Dynamics and Predictors of Serum TSH and fT4 Reference Limits in Early Pregnancy: A Study Within the Danish National Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283306
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Jun;101(6):2484-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Peter Laurberg
Stine Linding Andersen
Peter Hindersson
Ellen A Nohr
Jørn Olsen
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Jun;101(6):2484-92
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Reference Values
Registries
Thyroid Function Tests
Thyrotropin - blood
Thyroxine - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Thyroid hormones are important developmental factors and levels should be adequate both in the pregnant woman and in the fetus. However, there is no consensus on maternal thyroid test reference limits in early pregnancy.
Estimation of week-to-week changes in and predictors of TSH and free T4 (fT4) reference limits in the first trimester of pregnancy.
Measurement of TSH and fT4 in biobank sera collected in pregnancy weeks 5-19 from a random sample of the Danish National Birth Cohort that enrolled 101 032 pregnant in 1996-2002.
National cohort of pregnant women.
Healthy participants (n = 6671) were identified and individual characteristics retrieved using interview data and data from Danish national health registers.
None.
Reference limits for TSH and fT4 in each first trimester pregnancy week and predictors of these reference limits.
TSH reference limits were very variable. Up to and including week 6, nonpregnancy reference limits could be used. In weeks 9-12, TSH upper reference limit was approximately 0.4 mU/L lower than the nonpregnancy upper limit. The TSH lower reference limit was approximately 0.1 mU/L. fT4 variations were reverse to those of TSH, but changes were small with approximately 4% higher reference limits during the weeks 9-12. TSH upper reference limit was lower in multiparous women and women with lower iodine intake but higher in obese women. fT4 was lower in smokers.
TSH reference limits differ widely in the first trimester of pregnancy. The use of a uniform set of reference limits is an inordinate simplification that will lead to frequent misclassification and possibly to incorrect choice of therapy.
PubMed ID
27115059 View in PubMed
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Early or recurrent preterm birth and maternal cardiovascular disease risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96434
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;20(8):604-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Janet M Catov
Chun Sen Wu
Jorn Olsen
Kim Sutton-Tyrrell
Jiong Li
Ellen A Nohr
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. catovjm@upmc.edu
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2010 Aug;20(8):604-9
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: Preterm birth (PTB) has been associated with a later increased risk of maternal cardiovascular disease (CVD). We hypothesized a more pronounced relation between early or recurrent PTB and maternal CVD risk. METHODS: We related PTB severity (earlier gestational age at delivery) and recurrence (>/=2) among women with births from 1973-1983 in Denmark (n = 427,765) to maternal CVD morbidity or mortality (1977-2006). Birth data were linked to CVD hospitalizations and deaths identified in national registers and data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: Women with a prior PTB had excess CVD after adjustment for age, parity, and education (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.36 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.31, 1.41]). This was only modestly attenuated when women with preeclampsia or small for gestational age births were excluded, and the relationship was stronger for CVD mortality (HR = 1.98 [1.73, 2.26]). Recurrent PTB was associated with higher CVD morbidity compared to women with one PTB, particularly for ischemic events (HR = 1.78 [1.40, 2.27] vs. 1.22 [1.09, 1.36]). Risk was similarly elevated among women with early, moderate, and late PTB. Sensitivity analysis suggested that confounding by smoking only partly explained these associations. CONCLUSIONS: Women with PTB, especially recurrent PTB, were at increased risk for CVD, suggesting common causes of these conditions.
PubMed ID
20609340 View in PubMed
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A genome-wide association study identifies CDHR3 as a susceptibility locus for early childhood asthma with severe exacerbations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106115
Source
Nat Genet. 2014 Jan;46(1):51-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Klaus Bønnelykke
Patrick Sleiman
Kasper Nielsen
Eskil Kreiner-Møller
Josep M Mercader
Danielle Belgrave
Herman T den Dekker
Anders Husby
Astrid Sevelsted
Grissel Faura-Tellez
Li Juel Mortensen
Lavinia Paternoster
Richard Flaaten
Anne Mølgaard
David E Smart
Philip F Thomsen
Morten A Rasmussen
Silvia Bonàs-Guarch
Claus Holst
Ellen A Nohr
Rachita Yadav
Michael E March
Thomas Blicher
Peter M Lackie
Vincent W V Jaddoe
Angela Simpson
John W Holloway
Liesbeth Duijts
Adnan Custovic
Donna E Davies
David Torrents
Ramneek Gupta
Mads V Hollegaard
David M Hougaard
Hakon Hakonarson
Hans Bisgaard
Author Affiliation
1] Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood, Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen & Danish Pediatric Asthma Center, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark. [2] [3].
Source
Nat Genet. 2014 Jan;46(1):51-5
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - etiology - genetics
Cadherins - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
DNA Repair Enzymes - genetics
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Interleukins - genetics
Male
Membrane Proteins - chemistry - genetics - metabolism
Models, Molecular
Neoplasm Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Protein Conformation
Receptors, Cell Surface - genetics
Abstract
Asthma exacerbations are among the most frequent causes of hospitalization during childhood, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We performed a genome-wide association study of a specific asthma phenotype characterized by recurrent, severe exacerbations occurring between 2 and 6 years of age in a total of 1,173 cases and 2,522 controls. Cases were identified from national health registries of hospitalization, and DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. We identified five loci with genome-wide significant association. Four of these, GSDMB, IL33, RAD50 and IL1RL1, were previously reported as asthma susceptibility loci, but the effect sizes for these loci in our cohort were considerably larger than in the previous genome-wide association studies of asthma. We also obtained strong evidence for a new susceptibility gene, CDHR3 (encoding cadherin-related family member 3), which is highly expressed in airway epithelium. These results demonstrate the strength of applying specific phenotyping in the search for asthma susceptibility genes.
PubMed ID
24241537 View in PubMed
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Genome-wide association study identifies four loci associated with eruption of permanent teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131166
Source
PLoS Genet. 2011 Sep;7(9):e1002275
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Frank Geller
Bjarke Feenstra
Hao Zhang
John R Shaffer
Thomas Hansen
Ann-Louise Esserlind
Heather A Boyd
Ellen A Nohr
Nicholas J Timpson
Ghazaleh Fatemifar
Lavinia Paternoster
David M Evans
Robert J Weyant
Steven M Levy
Mark Lathrop
George Davey Smith
Jeffrey C Murray
Jes Olesen
Thomas Werge
Mary L Marazita
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Mads Melbye
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. fge@ssi.dk
Source
PLoS Genet. 2011 Sep;7(9):e1002275
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alleles
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
HMGA2 Protein - genetics
Humans
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Tooth Eruption - genetics
Tooth, Deciduous - physiology
United States
Abstract
The sequence and timing of permanent tooth eruption is thought to be highly heritable and can have important implications for the risk of malocclusion, crowding, and periodontal disease. We conducted a genome-wide association study of number of permanent teeth erupted between age 6 and 14 years, analyzed as age-adjusted standard deviation score averaged over multiple time points, based on childhood records for 5,104 women from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Four loci showed association at P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21931568 View in PubMed
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Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113630
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2013 Sep 15;22(18):3807-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2013
Author
Ghazaleh Fatemifar
Clive J Hoggart
Lavinia Paternoster
John P Kemp
Inga Prokopenko
Momoko Horikoshi
Victoria J Wright
Jon H Tobias
Stephen Richmond
Alexei I Zhurov
Arshed M Toma
Anneli Pouta
Anja Taanila
Kirsi Sipila
Raija Lähdesmäki
Demetris Pillas
Frank Geller
Bjarke Feenstra
Mads Melbye
Ellen A Nohr
Susan M Ring
Beate St Pourcain
Nicholas J Timpson
George Davey Smith
Marjo-Riitta Jarvelin
David M Evans
Author Affiliation
MRC Centre for Causal Analyses in Translational Epidemiology (CAiTE), School of Social and Community Medicine, Lower Maudlin Street, Bristol, UK. g.fatemifar@bristol.ac.uk
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2013 Sep 15;22(18):3807-17
Date
Sep-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height - genetics
Chromosomes, Human
Dentition
Face - anatomy & histology
Female
Finland
Genetic Loci
Genetic Pleiotropy
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Tooth Eruption - genetics
Abstract
Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of 'age at first tooth' and 'number of teeth' using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P
Notes
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