Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
Cites: Child Obes. 2012 Dec;8(6):533-4123181919
Cites: Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Aug;6(3-4):188-9621529264
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Jan;38(1):40-523828099
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2014 May;15(3):151-6124754463
Cites: Semin Liver Dis. 2001;21(1):3-1611296695
Cites: Pediatr Clin North Am. 2011 Dec;58(6):1375-92, x22093857
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Feb;20(2):371-521869763
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2012 Jul;199(1):2-722733887
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jul;97(7):E1099-10522508709
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Feb;19(2):146-5219171470
Cites: Pediatr Diabetes. 2014 Sep;15 Suppl 20:4-1725182305
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2001 Feb;25(2):177-8411410817
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2001 Dec;86(12):5755-6111739435
Cites: Diabetes. 2002 Apr;51(4):1022-711916921
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Mar 25;107(11):1562-612654618
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 20;362(9388):951-714511928
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Aug;114(2 Suppl 4th Report):555-7615286277
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2004 Oct;28(10):1257-6315278103
Cites: Nutr Rev. 1981 Feb;39(2):43-557010232
Cites: Stat Med. 1992 Jul;11(10):1305-191518992
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 Oct;58(4):463-78379501
Cites: Diabetes. 1997 Jun;46(6):983-89166669
Cites: Diabetologia. 1999 Jan;42(1):113-610027589
Cites: Diabetes. 1999 Oct;48(10):2039-4410512371
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Mar;14(3):357-6716648604
Cites: Pediatrics. 2006 Oct;118(4):1388-9317015527
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jan;30(1):89-9417192339
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;61(7):877-8317151586
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Jul 15;118(3):277-8318591439
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2009 Feb;32(2):342-718957533
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Sep;94(9):3440-719531593
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun 1;171(11):1195-20220457571
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Sep;163(3):413-920584996
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Dec;95(12):5189-9820829185
Cites: J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol. 2010;2(3):100-621274322
Cites: Diabetologia. 2011 Apr;54(4):869-7521181394
Cites: Abdom Imaging. 2013 Apr;38(2):315-922736224
PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
Less detail

Copenhagen study of overweight patients with coronary artery disease undergoing low energy diet or interval training: the randomized CUT-IT trial protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106071
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:106
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lene Rørholm Pedersen
Rasmus Huan Olsen
Marianne Frederiksen
Arne Astrup
Elizaveta Chabanova
Philip Hasbak
Jens Juul Holst
Andreas Kjær
John W Newman
Rosemary Walzem
Ulrik Wisløff
Ahmad Sajadieh
Steen Bendix Haugaard
Eva Prescott
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. lrpedersen@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:106
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - methods
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Overweight - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is accountable for more than 7 million deaths each year according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In a European population 80% of patients diagnosed with CAD are overweight and 31% are obese. Physical inactivity and overweight are major risk factors in CAD, thus central strategies in secondary prevention are increased physical activity and weight loss.
In a randomized controlled trial 70 participants with stable CAD, age 45-75, body mass index 28-40 kg/m2 and no diabetes are randomized (1:1) to 12 weeks of intensive exercise or weight loss both succeeded by a 40-week follow-up. The exercise protocol consist of supervised aerobic interval training (AIT) at 85-90% of VO2peak 3 times weekly for 12 weeks followed by supervised AIT twice weekly for 40 weeks. In the weight loss arm dieticians instruct the participants in a low energy diet (800-1000 kcal/day) for 12 weeks, followed by 40 weeks of weight maintenance combined with supervised AIT twice weekly. The primary endpoint of the study is change in coronary flow reserve after the first 12 weeks' intervention. Secondary endpoints include cardiovascular, metabolic, inflammatory and anthropometric measures.
The study will compare the short and long-term effects of a protocol consisting of AIT alone or a rapid weight loss followed by AIT. Additionally, it will provide new insight in mechanisms behind the benefits of exercise and weight loss. We wish to contribute to the creation of effective secondary prevention and sustainable rehabilitation strategies in the large population of overweight and obese patients diagnosed with CAD.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01724567.
PubMed ID
24252596 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coronary microvascular function, insulin sensitivity and body composition in predicting exercise capacity in overweight patients with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274408
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2015;15:159
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anders Jürs
Lene Rørholm Pedersen
Rasmus Huan Olsen
Martin Snoer
Elizaveta Chabanova
Steen Bendix Haugaard
Eva Prescott
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2015;15:159
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Composition
Body mass index
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Coronary Circulation
Coronary Vessels - physiopathology
Denmark
Echocardiography, Doppler
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Microcirculation
Microvessels - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Overweight - blood - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Oxygen consumption
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Stroke Volume
Time Factors
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a negative impact on exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to determine how coronary microvascular function, glucose metabolism and body composition contribute to exercise capacity in overweight patients with CAD and without diabetes.
Sixty-five non-diabetic, overweight patients with stable CAD, BMI 28-40 kg/m(2) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) above 35 % were recruited. A 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate glucose metabolism. Peak aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak) was assessed by a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Body composition was determined by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was used as a measure of microvascular function.
Median BMI was 31.3 and 72 % had impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. VO2peak adjusted for fat free mass was correlated with CFR (r?=?0.41, p?=?0.0007), LVEF (r?=?0.33, p?=?0.008) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) (r?=?0.32, p?=?0.01) while it was only weakly linked to measures of glucose metabolism and body composition. CFR, EDV and LVEF remained independent predictors of VO2peak in multivariable regression analysis.
The study established CFR, EDV and LVEF as independent predictors of VO2peak in overweight CAD patients with no or only mild functional symptoms and a LVEF?>?35 %. Glucose metabolism and body composition had minor impact on VO2peak. The findings suggest that central hemodynamic factors are important in limiting exercise capacity in overweight non-diabetic CAD patients.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Jan 21;301(3):286-9419155455
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2000 Aug 1;86(3):305-810922438
Cites: Ultrasound Med Biol. 2001 Sep;27(9):1199-20511597360
Cites: Diabetes. 2002 Feb;51 Suppl 1:S212-2011815482
Cites: Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2003 Dec;285(6):H2679-8712933344
Cites: Diabet Med. 2004 Aug;21(8):889-9515270793
Cites: Circulation. 1984 Oct;70(4):552-606478561
Cites: Diabetologia. 1985 Jul;28(7):412-93899825
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Oct 22;317(17):10983657876
Cites: Comput Methods Programs Biomed. 1996 Aug;50(3):253-648894385
Cites: Am Heart J. 1997 Aug;134(2 Pt 1):229-379313602
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Nov 15;30(6):1472-79362404
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2012 Aug;5(8):805-1522897994
Cites: Am Heart J. 2009 Oct;158(4 Suppl):S45-5219782788
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2009 Jun;16(3):290-619404197
Cites: Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:9722889317
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Dec;33(23):2917-2722952138
Cites: Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2013 Jul;14(7):677-8323169759
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:10624252596
Cites: Echocardiography. 2014 May;31(5):654-6224299009
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1999 Sep;22(9):1462-7010480510
Cites: Acta Physiol Scand. 1956 Dec 31;38(2):193-913394341
Cites: Am Heart J. 2005 Jan;149(1):152-815660047
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Oct;29(10):1252-815997247
Cites: Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2005 Oct;289(4):H1627-3415937100
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2005 Dec 15;96(12):1686-9116360358
Cites: Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2006 Aug;291(2):H564-916501023
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2007 Sep;77 Suppl 1:S258-6217467109
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2008 Jun 15;101(12):1694-918549842
Cites: Am Heart J. 2008 Aug;156(2):292-30018657659
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Aug;22(8):1009-1725082954
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Feb 17;342(7):454-6010675425
PubMed ID
26613591 View in PubMed
Less detail

MR spectroscopy of liver in overweight children and adolescents: investigation of ¹H T2 relaxation times at 3T.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136447
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2012 May;81(5):811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Elizaveta Chabanova
Dorthe S Bille
Ebbe Thisted
Jens-Christian Holm
Henrik S Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark. elcha@heh.regionh.dk
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2012 May;81(5):811-4
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Algorithms
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Overweight - epidemiology - physiopathology
Protons - diagnostic use
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The objective was to investigate T(2) relaxation values and to optimize hepatic fat quantification using proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3T in overweight and obese children and adolescents.
The study included 123 consecutive children and adolescents with a body mass index above the 97th percentile according to age and sex. (1)H MR spectroscopy was performed at 3.0 T using point resolved spectroscopy sequence with series TE. T(2) relaxation values and hepatic fat content corrected for the T(2) relaxation effects were calculated.
T(2) values for water ranged from 22 ms to 42 ms (mean value 28 ms) and T(2) values for fat ranged from 36 ms to 99 ms (mean value 64 ms). Poor correlation was observed: (1) between T(2) relaxation times of fat and T(2) relaxation times of water (correlation coefficient r=0.038, P=0.79); (2) between T(2) relaxation times of fat and fat content (r=0.057, P=0.69); (3) between T(2) relaxation times of water and fat content (r=0.160, P=0.26). Correlation between fat peak content and the T(2) corrected fat content decreased with increasing echo time TE: r=0.97 for TE=45, r=0.93 for TE=75, r=0.89 for TE=105, P
PubMed ID
21377308 View in PubMed
Less detail

A randomised trial comparing weight loss with aerobic exercise in overweight individuals with coronary artery disease: The CUT-IT trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271856
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Aug;22(8):1009-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Lene R Pedersen
Rasmus H Olsen
Anders Jürs
Arne Astrup
Elizaveta Chabanova
Lene Simonsen
Ulrik Wisløff
Steen B Haugaard
Eva Prescott
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Aug;22(8):1009-17
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Caloric Restriction - adverse effects
Combined Modality Therapy
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Denmark
Exercise Test
Exercise Therapy - adverse effects
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Lipids - blood
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Overweight - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Physical Fitness
Secondary Prevention - methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
We aimed to compare the effect of aerobic interval training (AIT) versus a low energy diet (LED) on physical fitness, body composition, cardiovascular risk factors and symptoms in overweight individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD).
Seventy non-diabetic participants with CAD, a BMI>28 kg/m(2) and aged 45 to 75 years were randomised to 12 weeks' AIT at 90% peak heart rate three times a week or LED (800-1000 kcal/day) for 8-10 weeks followed by 2-4 weeks' weight maintenance diet.
Twenty-six (74%) AIT and 29 (83%) LED participants completed intervention per protocol. VO2peak (mL/kg fat free mass(0.67)/min) increased by 10.4% (p?=?0.002) following AIT, whereas no change was observed after LED (-3.0%, p?=?0.095). The LED group lost 10.6% body weight and 26.6% body fat mass (p?
PubMed ID
25082954 View in PubMed
Less detail