Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Health beliefs of rural Canadians: implications for practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176854
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2004 Dec;12(6):258-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Elizabeth Thomlinson
Meg Kathleen McDonagh
Kathryn Baird Crooks
Margaret Lees
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada.
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2004 Dec;12(6):258-63
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Holistic Health
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to examine the health beliefs, values and practices of rural residents living in two geographically diverse regions of western Canada.
An ethnographic study with semistructured interviews of 55 persons was conducted with participants ranging in age from 19 to 84 years.
Being healthy was described as having balance in one's life, taking into consideration the relationship between the physical, mental, social, and spiritual aspects of the person. Health-seeking behaviours spanned the gamut of diet, exercise, sleep, home remedies, a belief in a spiritual being, to consulting health professionals. Resources that participants valued included professionals who listened, friends, neighbours, church, music, elders, ambulance service and the internet.
It is important that professionals view the person beyond the disease and take into account more than the physical manifestations of an illness. A key component is the demonstration of respect for all persons regardless of age. It is essential that health professionals develop websites providing accurate health-care information. Participants noted the need to recruit and retain professionals in rural regions.
PubMed ID
15615579 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maximizing the involvement of rural nurses in policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177767
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Judith C Kulig
Deana Nahachewsky
Elizabeth Thomlinson
Martha L P Macleod
Fran Curran
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, AB.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):88-96
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Policy Making
Professional Competence - standards
Rural health services - organization & administration
Social Support
Abstract
Rural health issues are increasingly recognized as needing attention, but many health policies in Canada are developed for the urban context and universally applied to rural settings. Addressing rural nurses' opportunities for involvement in policy will contribute to our general understanding of rural health while improving community health services. Rural nurses are in a unique position to assist because of their intimate knowledge of their communities and their position as informal community leaders. Challenges to their involvement include decreased numbers and lack of educational preparation about policy. A strength is the higher percentage of rural nurses who are managers compared to their urban counterparts. Nursing education programs need to include theoretical content and practical opportunities related to health policy. Managers need to support rural nurses' attempts in policy development by providing opportunities for membership on policy committees. Finally, once obtaining skills in the policy arena, rural nurses need to work within their communities and workplaces to help develop and implement more appropriate rural-based policies.
PubMed ID
15503920 View in PubMed
Less detail

Men and women managing coronary artery disease risk: urban-rural contrasts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173243
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Mar;62(5):1091-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Kathryn M King
Elizabeth Thomlinson
Julianne Sanguins
Pamela LeBlanc
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4. kingk@ucalgary.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2006 Mar;62(5):1091-102
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - ethnology - prevention & control
Cultural Characteristics
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
People's beliefs about health and making lifestyle changes associated with risk reduction and disease prevention can vary based on their gender and ethnocultural affiliation. Our objective was to describe and explain how gender and ethnocultural affiliation influence the process that people undergo when faced with making lifestyle changes related to their coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. A series of grounded theory studies were undertaken in Alberta, Canada, with men and women from five ethnocultural groups diagnosed with CAD. Here, we describe the cultural aspects associated with urban- and rural-living in 42 Euro-Celtic men and women. Data were collected through semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews and analysed using constant comparative methods. The core variable that emerged through the process was 'meeting the challenge'. There were three phases to the process of managing CAD risk: pre-diagnosis/event, liminal self, and living with CAD. Intra-personal, inter-personal, extra-personal, and socio-demographic factors influenced the participants' capacity to meet the challenge of managing their CAD risk. The influence of these factors was either direct or indirect through the intertwined elements of the participants' knowledge about CAD and perceived extent of necessary change. Each element of this process was influenced by the participants' gender and culture (urban- versus rural-living). When healthcare providers understand and work with the gender- and ethnoculturally based components that influence people's appraisal of their cardiac health and their decision-making, appropriate secondary prevention interventions and positive health outcomes are more likely to follow.
PubMed ID
16115710 View in PubMed
Less detail