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A Conceptual Framework of Organizational Capacity for Public Health Equity Action (OC-PHEA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112504
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 May-Jun;104(3):e262-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Benita E Cohen
Annette Schultz
Elizabeth McGibbon
Madine VanderPlaat
Raewyn Bassett
Kathy GermAnn
Hope Beanlands
Lesley Anne Fuga
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. benita.cohen@ad.umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 May-Jun;104(3):e262-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Capacity Building - organization & administration
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Models, organizational
Public Health Practice
Social Justice
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
The Canadian public health sector's foundational values of social justice and equity, and its mandate to promote population health, make it ideally situated to take a strong lead in addressing persistent and unacceptable inequities in health between socially disadvantaged, marginalized or excluded groups and the general population. There is currently much attention paid to improving understanding of pathways to health equity and development of effective population health interventions to reduce health inequities. Strengthening the capacity of the public health sector to develop, implement and sustain equity-focused population health initiatives - including readiness to engage in a social justice-based equity framework for public health - is an equally essential area that has received less attention. Unfortunately, there is evidence that current capacity of the Canadian public health sector to address inequities is highly variable. The first step in developing a sustained approach to improving capacity for health equity action is the identification of what this type of capacity entails. This paper outlines a Conceptual Framework of Organizational Capacity for Public Health Equity Action (OC-PHEA), grounded in the experience of Canadian public health equity champions, that can guide research, dialogue, reflection and action on public health capacity development to achieve health equity goals.
PubMed ID
23823893 View in PubMed
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Health-care access as a social determinant of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154706
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Sep;104(7):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Elizabeth McGibbon
Josephine Etowa
Charmaine McPherson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish , Nova Scotia.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Sep;104(7):22-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Nursing
Social Justice
Abstract
The social determinants of health (SDH) are recognized as important indicators of health and well-being. Health-care services (primary, secondary, tertiary care) have not until recently been considered an SDH. Inequities in access to health care are changing this view. These inequities include barriers faced by certain population groups at point of care, such as the lack of cultural competence of health-care providers. The authors show how a social justice perspective can help nurses understand how to link inequities in access to poorer health outcomes, and they call on nurses to break the cycle of oppression that contributes to these inequities.
PubMed ID
18856224 View in PubMed
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Health Outcome and Follow-up Care Differences Between First Nation and Non-First Nation Coronary Angiogram Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295241
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2018 Oct; 34(10):1333-1340
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Annette Schultz
Lindsey Dahl
Elizabeth McGibbon
Jarvis Brownlie
Catherine Cook
Basem Elbarouni
Alan Katz
Thang Nguyen
Jo Ann Sawatzky
Moneca Sinclaire
Karen Throndson
Randy Fransoo
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (RFHS), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Electronic address: annette.schultz@umanitoba.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2018 Oct; 34(10):1333-1340
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
First Nations (FN) people experience high rates of ischemic heart disease (IHD) morbidity and mortality. Increasing access to angiography may lead to improved outcomes. We compared various outcomes and follow-up care post-index angiography between FN and non-FN patients.
All index angiography patients in Manitoba were identified between April 1, 2000 and March 31, 2009 and categorized into acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or non-AMI groups based on whether their angiogram occurred within 7 days of an AMI. Cox proportional hazard models estimated associations between FN status and outcomes related to mortality, subsequent hospitalizations, revascularizations, and physician visits.
Cardiovascular mortality was higher among FN patients in the non-AMI group (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-1.94) and in the AMI group (HR = 1.57, 95% CI, 1.05-2.35). FN patients were also more likely to have a subsequent hospitalization for AMI (HR = 2.26, 95% CI, 1.79-2.85) in the non-AMI group. FN patients in the non-AMI group were less likely to receive percutaneous coronary intervention (HR = 0.85, 95% CI, 0.73-0.99) and more likely to undergo coronary artery bypass graft (HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.10-1.45). FN patients in both groups were less likely to visit a cardiologist/cardiac surgeon, internal medicine specialist, or family physician within 3 months and 1 year of angiography.
Cardiovascular health and follow-up care outcomes of FN and non-FN patients who undergo angiography are not the same. Addressing Indigenous determinants of health are necessary to improve cardiovascular outcomes.
PubMed ID
30269830 View in PubMed
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Index coronary angiography use in Manitoba, Canada: a population-level descriptive analysis of First Nations and non-First Nations recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290826
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 03 25; 8(3):e020856
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-25-2018
Author
Annette S H Schultz
Lindsey Dahl
Elizabeth McGibbon
R Jarvis Brownlie
Catherine Cook
Basem Elbarouni
Alan Katz
Thang Nguyen
Jo Ann Sawatzky
Moneca Sinclaire
Karen Throndson
Randy Fransoo
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (RFHS), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 03 25; 8(3):e020856
Date
03-25-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
To investigate recipient characteristics and rates of index angiography among First Nations (FN) and non-FN populations in Manitoba, Canada.
Population-based, secondary analysis of provincial administrative health data.
All adults 18 years or older who received an index angiogram between 2000/2001 and 2008/2009. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Descriptive statistics for age, sex, income quintile by rural and urban residency and Charlson Comorbidity Index for FN and non-FN recipients. (2) Annual index angiogram rates for FN and non-FN populations and among those rates of 'urgent' angiograms based on acute myocardial infarction (AMI)-related hospitalisations during the previous 7?days. (3) Proportions of people who did not receive an angiogram in the 20 years preceding an ischaemic heart disease (IHD) diagnosis or a cardiovascular death; stratified by age (
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2017 Apr 8;389(10077):1453-1463 PMID 28402827
Cites: CMAJ. 2014 Jul 8;186(10 ):E372-80 PMID 24847149
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-48 PMID 21075979
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jan;16(1):184-90 PMID 18223633
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Jun 26;160(12):1862-6 PMID 10871982
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Oct 19;11:814 PMID 22011510
Cites: Intern Med J. 2016 Feb;46(2):202-13 PMID 26547636
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 2003;24(3-4):312-23 PMID 15015865
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):985-6 PMID 18981431
Cites: Med Care. 2011 May;49(5):489-95 PMID 21422958
Cites: Nurse Res. 2002;9(3):28-41 PMID 11985146
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-61 PMID 16078555
Cites: J Aging Health. 2010 Feb;22(1):27-47 PMID 20048126
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 7;356(23):2388-98 PMID 17554120
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85 PMID 19577696
Cites: Heart Lung Circ. 2012 Oct;21(10):618-22 PMID 22726402
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Jun 23;180(13):E118-25 PMID 19546444
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Sep;22(9):1231-8 PMID 17594129
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 May;33(6):1756-824 PMID 10334456
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Apr 10;12:281 PMID 22490109
Cites: JAMA. 2010 May 12;303(18):1841-7 PMID 20460623
Cites: Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Sep;32(4):200-7 PMID 23046802
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-9 PMID 16224307
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jan 19;(1):CD004816 PMID 21249663
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2014 Apr 15;173(1):110-7 PMID 24630335
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2010 May;25(5):430-4 PMID 20107917
Cites: Heart Lung Circ. 2010 May-Jun;19(5-6):325-36 PMID 20363187
Cites: Am J Med Sci. 1998 May;315(5):302-6 PMID 9587086
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Sep 4;135(5):352-66 PMID 11529699
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Mar 20;10(3):e0121779 PMID 25793978
Cites: Health Rep. 2009 Dec;20(4):21-9 PMID 20108603
Cites: Ethn Health. 2008 Apr;13(2):109-27 PMID 18425710
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 May 10;344(19):1443-9 PMID 11346810
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2010 Apr 1;105(7):1019-23 PMID 20346324
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2017 Dec 1;27(6):1055-1060 PMID 29096003
Cites: Health Policy. 2006 Dec;79(2-3):132-43 PMID 16519957
Cites: Group Process Intergroup Relat. 2016 Jul;19(4):528-542 PMID 27547105
Cites: Am Heart J. 2006 Apr;151(4):909-14 PMID 16569561
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2002 Jul;7(3):186-8 PMID 12171751
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Oct 6;358(9288):1147-53 PMID 11597669
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2005 Apr;40(2):389-400 PMID 15762898
Cites: Postgrad Med J. 2004 Jul;80(945):411-4 PMID 15254306
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1979 Jun;90(6):957-64 PMID 443692
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jul 2;290(1):86-97 PMID 12837716
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1629-36 PMID 23988340
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Aug;45(3):383-97 PMID 9232733
Cites: CMAJ. 2017 Aug 8;189(31):E1006-E1007 PMID 28790055
PubMed ID
29581209 View in PubMed
Less detail

Index coronary angiography use in Manitoba, Canada: a population-level descriptive analysis of First Nations and non-First Nations recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294896
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 03 25; 8(3):e020856
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-25-2018
Author
Annette S H Schultz
Lindsey Dahl
Elizabeth McGibbon
R Jarvis Brownlie
Catherine Cook
Basem Elbarouni
Alan Katz
Thang Nguyen
Jo Ann Sawatzky
Moneca Sinclaire
Karen Throndson
Randy Fransoo
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences (RFHS), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 03 25; 8(3):e020856
Date
03-25-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnostic imaging - mortality
Coronary Angiography - trends - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnostic imaging
Abstract
To investigate recipient characteristics and rates of index angiography among First Nations (FN) and non-FN populations in Manitoba, Canada.
Population-based, secondary analysis of provincial administrative health data.
All adults 18 years or older who received an index angiogram between 2000/2001 and 2008/2009. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Descriptive statistics for age, sex, income quintile by rural and urban residency and Charlson Comorbidity Index for FN and non-FN recipients. (2) Annual index angiogram rates for FN and non-FN populations and among those rates of 'urgent' angiograms based on acute myocardial infarction (AMI)-related hospitalisations during the previous 7?days. (3) Proportions of people who did not receive an angiogram in the 20 years preceding an ischaemic heart disease (IHD) diagnosis or a cardiovascular death; stratified by age (
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2017 Apr 8;389(10077):1453-1463 PMID 28402827
Cites: CMAJ. 2014 Jul 8;186(10 ):E372-80 PMID 24847149
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-48 PMID 21075979
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jan;16(1):184-90 PMID 18223633
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Jun 26;160(12):1862-6 PMID 10871982
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Oct 19;11:814 PMID 22011510
Cites: Intern Med J. 2016 Feb;46(2):202-13 PMID 26547636
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 2003;24(3-4):312-23 PMID 15015865
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):985-6 PMID 18981431
Cites: Med Care. 2011 May;49(5):489-95 PMID 21422958
Cites: Nurse Res. 2002;9(3):28-41 PMID 11985146
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-61 PMID 16078555
Cites: J Aging Health. 2010 Feb;22(1):27-47 PMID 20048126
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 7;356(23):2388-98 PMID 17554120
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85 PMID 19577696
Cites: Heart Lung Circ. 2012 Oct;21(10):618-22 PMID 22726402
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Jun 23;180(13):E118-25 PMID 19546444
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Sep;22(9):1231-8 PMID 17594129
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 May;33(6):1756-824 PMID 10334456
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Apr 10;12:281 PMID 22490109
Cites: JAMA. 2010 May 12;303(18):1841-7 PMID 20460623
Cites: Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2012 Sep;32(4):200-7 PMID 23046802
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-9 PMID 16224307
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jan 19;(1):CD004816 PMID 21249663
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2014 Apr 15;173(1):110-7 PMID 24630335
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2010 May;25(5):430-4 PMID 20107917
Cites: Heart Lung Circ. 2010 May-Jun;19(5-6):325-36 PMID 20363187
Cites: Am J Med Sci. 1998 May;315(5):302-6 PMID 9587086
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Sep 4;135(5):352-66 PMID 11529699
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Mar 20;10(3):e0121779 PMID 25793978
Cites: Health Rep. 2009 Dec;20(4):21-9 PMID 20108603
Cites: Ethn Health. 2008 Apr;13(2):109-27 PMID 18425710
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 May 10;344(19):1443-9 PMID 11346810
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2010 Apr 1;105(7):1019-23 PMID 20346324
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2017 Dec 1;27(6):1055-1060 PMID 29096003
Cites: Health Policy. 2006 Dec;79(2-3):132-43 PMID 16519957
Cites: Group Process Intergroup Relat. 2016 Jul;19(4):528-542 PMID 27547105
Cites: Am Heart J. 2006 Apr;151(4):909-14 PMID 16569561
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2002 Jul;7(3):186-8 PMID 12171751
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Oct 6;358(9288):1147-53 PMID 11597669
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2005 Apr;40(2):389-400 PMID 15762898
Cites: Postgrad Med J. 2004 Jul;80(945):411-4 PMID 15254306
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1979 Jun;90(6):957-64 PMID 443692
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jul 2;290(1):86-97 PMID 12837716
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1629-36 PMID 23988340
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Aug;45(3):383-97 PMID 9232733
Cites: CMAJ. 2017 Aug 8;189(31):E1006-E1007 PMID 28790055
PubMed ID
29581209 View in PubMed
Less detail

Racism and cardiovascular disease: implications for nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105382
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2013;23(4):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jennifer Jackson
Elizabeth McGibbon
Ingrid Waldron
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, The Ottawa Hospital, ON, Ontario. jenniferjackson.rn@gmail.com
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2013;23(4):12-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology - nursing - psychology
Cultural Characteristics
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Nurse's Role - psychology
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Racism - prevention & control
Social Determinants of Health
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Abstract
The social determinants of health (SDH) are recognized as a prominent influence on health outcomes across the lifespan. Racism is identified as a key SDH. In this article, the authors describe the concept of racism as an SDH, its impact in discriminatory actions and inactions, and the implications for cardiovascular nurses. Although research in Canada on the links among racism, stress, and cardiovascular disease is limited, there is growing evidence about the stress of racism and its long-term impact on cardiovascular health. The authors discuss how cardiovascular nursing could be enhanced through an understanding of racism-related stress, and race-based differences in cardiovascular care. The authors conclude with strategies for action to address this nursing concern.
PubMed ID
24400461 View in PubMed
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Truth and reconciliation: Healthcare organizational leadership.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296289
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2018 Dec 04; :840470418803379
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-04-2018
Author
Elizabeth McGibbon
Author Affiliation
1 Faculty of Science, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2018 Dec 04; :840470418803379
Date
Dec-04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Health leaders in organizational governance have a key role in enacting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action. This discussion highlights historical and contemporary truths that can underpin action for addressing colonial impacts on Indigenous (First Nations, Metis, and Inuit) health outcomes and healthcare. Emphasis is on white settler roles and responsibilities, where health-related Calls provide a blueprint for health reconciliation leadership. There is broad agreement of the necessity to acknowledge and address key cornerstones of decolonization at individual, intermediary, and organizational stages: racism, white settler power and privilege, and cultural safety. Already existing leadership roles, responsibilities, and inter-organizational networks can form a solid foundation for health leaders to bring the Calls to the table-alongside First Nations, Metis, and Inuit peoples, in meetings, forums, and conferences and in lobbying efforts to influence the structural, systemic shape, and direction of healthcare in Canada.
PubMed ID
30514125 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.