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1,3-Butadiene and leukemia among synthetic rubber industry workers: exposure-response relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166384
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Hong Cheng
Nalini Sathiakumar
John Graff
Robert Matthews
Elizabeth Delzell
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Ryals School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Birmingham, AL, USA. hcheng@ms.soph.uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens - chemical synthesis - chemistry - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Dimethyldithiocarbamate - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphoid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Rubber - adverse effects - chemical synthesis - chemistry
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous research updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers during the period 1944-1998, determined if leukemia and other cancers were associated with several employment factors and carried out Poisson regression analysis to examine exposure-response associations between estimated exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) or other chemicals and cancer. The present study used Cox regression procedures to examine further the exposure-response relationship between several unlagged and lagged, continuous, time-dependent BD exposure indices (BD parts per million (ppm)-years, the total number of exposures to BD concentrations >100 ppm ("peaks") and average intensity of BD) and leukemia, lymphoid neoplasms and myeloid neoplasms. All three BD exposure indices were associated positively with leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (beta) from an analysis that controlled only for age was 2.9 x 10(-4) (p
PubMed ID
17123495 View in PubMed
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A follow-up study of women in the synthetic rubber industry: study methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165590
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):25-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Nalini Sathiakumar
Elizabeth Delzell
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA. nalini@uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):25-8
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Chemical Industry
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mice
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Rats
Rubber - adverse effects - chemical synthesis - chemistry
United States - epidemiology
Vital statistics
Abstract
Concerns about the possible toxic effects of workplace exposures in the synthetic rubber industry have centered on 1,3-butadiene (BD), styrene and dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDTC). Our previous mortality studies of over 17,000 male synthetic rubber workers found an excess of leukemia that may be due to BD or BD plus other chemicals. Experimental studies have shown that BD produces mammary tumors in female mice and rats and ovarian tumors in female mice.
This paper presents the methods of a follow-up study that evaluates the mortality experience of women employed in the North American synthetic rubber industry.
Women employed for at least 1 day at any of eight North American styrene-butadiene rubber plants were followed up from 1943 to 2002. Identifying and work history information were obtained from personnel records. Estimated quantitative exposure to BD, styrene and DMDTC, developed for our previous study of men, were used in this study. External analyses use the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) to compare the cohort's cause-specific mortality rates to the rates of the female general population of the states or the province where the plants are located. Internal analyses use the Poisson regression and Cox proportional hazards models to examine specific cancer mortality rates in relation to BD, styrene and DMDTC exposure, by comparing an exposed cohort subgroup with the rate of unexposed cohort members.
PubMed ID
17229413 View in PubMed
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Styrene and ischemic heart disease mortality among synthetic rubber industry workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171585
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2005 Dec;47(12):1235-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Elizabeth Delzell
Nalini Sathiakumar
John Graff
Robert Matthews
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294-0022, USA. edelzell@uab.edu
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2005 Dec;47(12):1235-43
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Occupational Exposure
Rubber
Styrene - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
We examined the relation between styrene and ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality among 16,579 men in the synthetic rubber industry.
Associations were measured using stratified and multivariable analysis.
Compared with workers with no exposure to styrene, men in the highest quintile of average intensity of exposure (5.50+ parts per million [ppm]) and in the highest quintile of cumulative exposure (60.67+ ppm-years) had IHD rate ratios of 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI]=0.96-1.35) and 1.07 (95% CI=0.90-1.27), respectively. Acute IHD was not associated with average intensity of exposure within the most recent 2 years or with other indices of exposure. Chronic IHD rates were elevated in subjects with the highest exposure; these associations were weak and imprecise, and evidence of a positive exposure-response relation was limited.
This study does not indicate that exposure to styrene causes fatal IHD.
PubMed ID
16340704 View in PubMed
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Validation of 1,3-butadiene exposure estimates for workers at a synthetic rubber plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166608
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):29-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Nalini Sathiakumar
Elizabeth Delzell
Hong Cheng
Jeremiah Lynch
William Sparks
Maurizio Macaluso
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, Birmingham, AL 35294-0022, USA. nalini@uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):29-43
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Carcinogens - administration & dosage - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower
Humans
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Rubber - adverse effects - chemistry
Abstract
This investigation assessed the validity of estimates of exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) developed for a plant included in a study of mortality among synthetic rubber industry workers. The estimates were developed without using historical measurement data and have not been validated previously.
Personal BD measurements came from an exposure-monitoring program initiated in 1977. For each job, we computed the year-specific difference between the BD estimate and the mean of BD measurements. We also computed rank correlation coefficients and calculated the mean, across all measurements, of the difference between the estimate and the measurement.
The mean BD concentration was 5.2 ppm for 4978 measurements and 4.7 ppm for the corresponding estimates. The mean difference between estimates and measurements was -0.50 ppm (standard deviation, 26.5 ppm) overall and ranged from -227.9 to +27.0 ppm among all 306 job/year combinations. Estimates were correlated with measurements for all 306 combinations (rank correlation coefficient, r=0.45, p
PubMed ID
17097078 View in PubMed
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