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Accelerometer-determined physical activity and self-reported health in a population of older adults (65-85 years): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264724
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hilde Lohne-Seiler
Bjorge H Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Abstract
The link between physical activity (PA) and prevention of disease, maintenance of independence, and improved quality of life in older adults is supported by strong evidence. However, there is a lack of data on population levels in this regard, where PA level has been measured objectively. The main aims were therefore to assess the level of accelerometer-determined PA and to examine its associations with self-reported health in a population of Norwegian older adults (65-85 years).
This was a part of a national multicenter study. Participants for the initial study were randomly selected from the national population registry, and the current study included those of the initial sample aged 65-85 years. The ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used to measure PA for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire was used to register self-reported health. Univariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustments were used for comparisons between multiple groups.
A total of 560 participants had valid activity registrations. Mean age (SD) was 71.8 (5.6) years for women (n=282) and 71.7 (5.2) years for men (n=278). Overall PA level (cpm) differed considerably between the age groups where the oldest (80-85 y) displayed a 50% lower activity level compared to the youngest (65-70 y). No sex differences were observed in overall PA within each age group. Significantly more men spent time being sedentary (65-69 and 70-74 years) and achieved more minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (75-79 years) compared to women. Significantly more women (except for the oldest), spent more minutes of low-intensity PA compared to men. PA differed across levels of self-reported health and a 51% higher overall PA level was registered in those, with "very good health" compared to those with "poor/very poor health".
Norwegian older adults PA levels differed by age. Overall, the elderly spent 66% of their time being sedentary and only 3% in MVPA. Twenty one percent of the participants fulfilled the current Norwegian PA recommendations. Overall PA levels were associated with self-reported health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24673834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerometer-determined physical activity in adults and older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132641
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Bjørge Herman Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sindre Mikal Dyrstad
Ingar Holme
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway. bjorge.herman.hansen@nih.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Feb;44(2):266-72
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Motor Activity
Norway
Sedentary lifestyle
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
There is a lack of large-scale comparable data on the population levels of physical activity (PA) and sedentary activity. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based multicenter study to describe the levels of PA and sedentary activity and to determine adherence to current national PA recommendations in Norwegian adults and older people.
In 2008 and 2009, PA was assessed objectively for seven consecutive days using the ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer in 3867 participants age 20-85 yr. A total of 3267 participants provided valid PA assessments that met all inclusion criteria.
Women and men did not differ in the overall activity levels (335 and 342 counts per minute, respectively) or in steps per day (8113 and 7951 steps per day, respectively). However, for intensity-specific PA, men accumulated significantly more minutes of sedentary activity and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) compared with women (557 vs 533 min of sedentary activity, P = 0.001 and 35 vs 33 min of MVPA, P = 0.01). Both overall activity levels and steps per day remained steady with age, until 65 yr, after which activity levels declined.
Overall, the study sample spent 62% of their time being sedentary, 25% in low-intensity PA, 9% in lifestyle activity, and 4% in MVPA. One in five people met current national PA recommendations. These results suggest that adults and older people spend the majority of their time being sedentary and that adherence to PA recommendations is low.
PubMed ID
21796052 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, aerobic fitness, muscle fitness, and markers of inflammation in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119134
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Elin Kolle
Lars Bo Andersen
Sigmund A Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports, Faculty of Teacher Education and Sports, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. jostsj@hisf.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe levels of inflammation markers in Norwegian children and to examine the associations of adiposity, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness with markers of inflammation.
In 2005-2006, 1467 nine-year-olds were randomly selected from all regions in Norway. The participation rate was 89%. The inflammatory markers evaluated included C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-a, hepatocyte growth factor, resistin, and interleukin-6. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Aerobic fitness was measured directly during a maximal cycle ergometer test. Adiposity was expressed as waist circumference (WC).
The girls had significantly higher levels of CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a compared with the boys. We observed a graded association of CRP and leptin levels across quintiles of WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness (P = 0.001 for all participants). The regression analyses revealed that WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness were independently associated with the CRP (WC ß = 0.158, P
PubMed ID
23135365 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness thresholds to define poor cardiometabolic health in children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299130
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Eivind Aadland
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Lars Bo Andersen
Geir Kåre Resaland
Elin Kolle
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Oxygen consumption
Reference Values
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Aerobic fitness is an apparent candidate for screening children and youth for poor cardiometabolic health and future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Yet, age- and sex-specific cut points for children and youth determined using a maximal protocol and directly measured peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak ) does not exist. We used a nationally representative sample of 1462 Norwegian children and youth (788 boys and 674 girls aged 8.7-10.4 years and 14.7-16.7 years) who in 2005-2006 performed a maximal cycle ergometer test with direct measurement of VO2peak , along with measurement of several other risk factors for CVD (systolic blood pressure, waist circumference:height ratio, total:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, triglycerides, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance). Based on the proportion of children having clustering (least favorable quartile) of 6 (1.6%), =5 (5.2%), and =4 (10.6%) CVD risk factors, we established the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile cut points for VO2peak (mL/kg/min) for children and youth aged 8-18 years. Classification accuracy was determined using the Kappa coefficient (k), sensitivity, and specificity. For boys, the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile VO2peak cut points were 33.6-36.4, 36.3-39.8, and 38.7-43.0 mL/kg/min, respectively. For girls, the corresponding cut points were 29.7-29.1, 32.4-31.4, and 34.8-33.5 mL/kg/min Together with BMI, but without more invasive measures of traditional risk factors for CVD, these cut points can be used to screen schoolchildren for poor cardiometabolic health with moderate discriminating ability (k = 0.53).
PubMed ID
30375665 View in PubMed
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The association between aerobic fitness and physical activity in children and adolescents: the European youth heart study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100607
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Sep;110(2):267-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Peter Lund Kristensen
Niels Christian Moeller
Lars Korsholm
Elin Kolle
Niels Wedderkopp
Karsten Froberg
Lars Bo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense M, Denmark. plkristensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Sep;110(2):267-75
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Exercise
Exercise Test
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Motor Activity
Physical Fitness
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The link between aerobic fitness and physical activity in children has been studied in a number of earlier studies and the results have generally shown weak to moderate correlations. This overall finding has been widely questioned partly because of the difficulty in obtaining valid estimates of physical activity. This study investigated the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between aerobic fitness and physical activity in a representative sample of 9 and 15-year-old children (n = 1260 cross-sectional, n = 153 longitudinal). The specific goal was to improve past studies using an objective method of activity assessment and taking into account a number of major sources of error. Data came from the Danish part of the European youth heart study, 1997-2003. The cross-sectional results generally showed a weak to moderate association between aerobic fitness and physical activity with standardized regression coefficients ranging from 0.14 to 0.33. The longitudinal results revealed a tendency towards an interaction effect of baseline physical activity on the relationship between changes in physical activity and aerobic fitness. Moderate to moderately strong regression effect sizes were observed in the lower quadrant of baseline physical activity compared to weak effect sizes in the remaining quadrants. In conclusion, the present study confirms earlier findings of a weak to moderate association between aerobic fitness and physical activity in total population of children. However, the study also indicates that inactive children can achieve notable increase in aerobic fitness by increasing their habitual physical activity level. A potential physiological explanation for these results is highlighted.
PubMed ID
20458593 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral density in Norwegian premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63307
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Aug;16(8):914-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Elin Kolle
Monica Klungland Torstveit
Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Sports and Physical Education, Ullevål Stadion, PO Box 4014, 0806 Oslo, Norway. elin.kolle@nih.no
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Aug;16(8):914-20
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Bone Density - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Densitometry, X-Ray
Female
Femur Neck
Humans
Incidence
Lumbar Vertebrae
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Premenopause - physiology
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aims of this study were: 1) to determine bone mineral density (BMD) in different age groups, 2) to determine the prevalence of low BMD, and 3) to determine the possible association between BMD and a number of risk factors in Norwegian premenopausal women. BMD of the lumbar spine (L(2)-L(4)), total body, and the hip (total femur, femur neck, and trochanter) were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (Prodigy, Lunar) in 145 randomly selected women aged 13-39 years. Information on other factors thought to influence BMD was obtained through questionnaire and a clinical interview. The group aged 25-29 years had the highest mean BMD in the total body, lumbar spine, and total femur while the group aged 13-19 years had the highest mean BMD in the femur neck and the trochanter. The mean BMD values of Norwegian premenopausal women were 3.4-5.1% higher than US/European reference data (P
PubMed ID
15502958 View in PubMed
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Correlates of objectively measured physical activity in adults and older people: a cross-sectional study of population-based sample of adults and older people living in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259220
Source
Int J Public Health. 2014 Apr;59(2):221-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Bjørge Herman Hansen
Yngvar Ommundsen
Ingar Holme
Elin Kolle
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Source
Int J Public Health. 2014 Apr;59(2):221-30
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Norway
Public Health
Self Efficacy
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of the study were to identify correlates of objectively measured physical activity and to determine whether the explanatory power of the correlates differed with sex, weight status or level of education.
Physical activity was assessed objectively in 3,867 participants, aged 20-85 years, for a consecutive 7 days using the ActiGraph GT1M activity monitor. Demographic and biological variables and levels of psychological, social environmental and physical environmental correlates were self-reported.
The complete set of correlates explained 18.6 % (p
PubMed ID
23619723 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cross sectional analysis of the association between mode of school transportation and physical fitness in children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108621
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lars Ostergaard
Elin Kolle
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Sigmund A Anderssen
Lars Bo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Center for Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense 5230, Denmark. lostergaard@health.sdu.dk
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:91
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Back
Bicycling
Body Composition
Child
Child Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Muscle strength
Muscle, Skeletal
Norway
Physical Endurance
Physical Fitness
Questionnaires
Schools
Sex Factors
Skinfold thickness
Transportation
Walking
Abstract
To investigate the associations between body composition, cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness in relation to travel mode to school in children and adolescents.
Children and adolescents from 40 elementary schools and 23 high schools representing all regions in Norway were invited to participate in the study. Anthropometry, cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness were tested at the school location. Questionnaires were used in order to register mode of transport to school, age, gender and levels of leisure time physical activity.
A total of 1694 (i.e. 60% of all invited participants) children and adolescents at a mean age of 9.6 and 15.6 respectively (SD?=?0.4 for both groups) were analyzed for associations with physical fitness variables. Males cycling to school had lower sum of skin folds than adolescents walking to school. Higher cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescents and male cyclists compared to walkers and passive commuters were observed. Among children, cycling and walking to school, higher isometric muscle endurance in the back extensors compared to passive commuters was observed.
Based on this national representative cross-sectional examination of randomly selected children and adolescents there is evidence that active commuting, especially cycling, is associated with a favourable body composition and better cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness as compared to passive commuting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23866826 View in PubMed
Less detail

Monitoring population levels of physical activity and sedentary time in Norway across the lifespan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297470
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Jan; 29(1):105-112
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Bjørge Herman Hansen
Elin Kolle
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Knut Eirik Dalene
Ulf Ekelund
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Jan; 29(1):105-112
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Sedentary Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The pandemic of physical inactivity is recognized globally but there is a scarcity of studies employing valid and reliable assessment methods of physical activity (PA) across the lifespan. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive description of objectively measured PA, sedentary time, and prevalence of meeting PA recommendations, in a population-based sample of Norwegian children, adolescents and adults.
Children and adolescents (6, 9 and 15-year-olds) were surveyed in 2011, and adults and older people (20-85-year-olds) were surveyed in 2014/15, including more than 8000 individuals. Anthropometric data were measured in children and adolescents and self-reported in the adult sample. PA was assessed by ActiGraph accelerometers for seven consecutive days, and PA indices include total PA (counts per minute), intensity-specific PA, and adherence to PA recommendations.
Six-year-olds are 21% and 70% more active than 9- and 15-year-olds, respectively (P 
PubMed ID
30276928 View in PubMed
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The Norwegian healthy body image programme: study protocol for a randomized controlled school-based intervention to promote positive body image and prevent disordered eating among Norwegian high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291831
Source
BMC Psychol. 2018 Mar 06; 6(1):8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-06-2018
Author
Christine Sundgot-Borgen
Solfrid Bratland-Sanda
Kethe M E Engen
Gunn Pettersen
Oddgeir Friborg
Monica Klungland Torstveit
Elin Kolle
Niva Piran
Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen
Jan H Rosenvinge
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports Medicine, The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, P.O. Box 4014, Sognsveien 220, N-0806, Oslo, Norway. c.s.borgen@nih.no.
Source
BMC Psychol. 2018 Mar 06; 6(1):8
Date
Mar-06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Image
Clinical Protocols
Feeding and Eating Disorders - therapy
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Norway
Psychotherapy
Schools
Students
Abstract
Body dissatisfaction and disordered eating raise the risk for eating disorders. In the prevention of eating disorders, many programmes have proved partly successful in using cognitive techniques to combat such risk factors. However, specific strategies to actively promote a positive body image are rarely used. The present paper outlines a protocol for a programme integrating the promotion of a positive body image and the prevention of disordered eating.
Using a cluster randomized controlled mixed methods design, 30 high schools and 2481 12th grade students were allocated to the Healthy Body Image programme or to a control condition. The intervention comprised three workshops, each of 90 min with the main themes body image, media literacy, and lifestyle. The intervention was interactive in nature, and were led by trained scientists. The outcome measures include standardized instruments administered pre-post intervention, and at 3 and 12 months follow-ups, respectively. Survey data cover feasibility and implementation issues. Qualitative interviews covers experiential data about students' benefits and satisfaction with the programme.
The present study is one of the first in the body image and disordered eating literature that integrates a health promotion and a disease prevention approach, as well as integrating standardized outcome measures and experiential findings. Along with mediator and moderator analyses it is expected that the Healthy Body Image programme may prove its efficacy. If so, plans are made with respect to further dissemination as well as communicating the findings to regional and national decision makers in the education and health care services.
The study was registered and released at ClinicalTrials.gov 21th August 2016 with the Clinical Trial.gov ID: PRSNCT02901457 . In addition, the study is approved by the Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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