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Cannabis use in relation to obesity and insulin resistance in the inuit population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259422
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Dec 31;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-2014
Author
Gerard Ngueta
Richard E Bélanger
Elhadji A Laouan-Sidi
Michel Lucas
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 Dec 31;
Date
Dec-31-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To ascertain the relationship between cannabis use, obesity, and insulin resistance.
Data on 786 Inuit adults from the Nunavik Inuit Health Survey (2004) were analyzed. Information on cannabis use was obtained from a self-completed, confidential questionnaire. Fasting blood glucose and insulin and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) served as surrogate markers of insulin resistance. Analysis of covariance and multivariate logistic regression ascertained relationships between cannabis use and outcomes.
Cannabis use was highly prevalent in the study population (57.4%) and was statistically associated with lower body mass index (BMI) (P
PubMed ID
25557382 View in PubMed
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A comparison of the metabolic response to abdominal obesity in two Canadian Inuit and First Nations population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134914
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Nov;19(11):2254-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Marie-Ludivine Chateau-Degat
David A Dannenbaum
Grace M Egeland
Evert Nieboer
Elhadji A Laouan Sidi
Belkacem Abdous
Éric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des Populations et Environnementale, Centre de recherche, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec (CRCHUQ), Québec, Québec, Canada. marie-ludivine.chateau-degat@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Nov;19(11):2254-60
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - ethnology - metabolism
Fasting
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Inuits
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - ethnology - etiology - metabolism
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - complications - ethnology - metabolism
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
Inuit and Cree populations are known for high obesity rates despite markedly different rates of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). To document this apparent discrepancy we evaluated the impact of body size parameters and fasting insulin (FI) on several T2DM risk factors among Inuit and Cree populations (Québec, Canada). A total of 1,104 adults (=18 years) Inuit and Cree individuals participated in a cross-sectional investigation. Interestingly, across both genders, across all levels of waist circumference (WC), Inuit showed lower levels of FI (age-adjusted, P
PubMed ID
21527893 View in PubMed
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Diet quality indices in relation to metabolic syndrome in an Indigenous Cree (Eeyouch) population in northern Québec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294585
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 Jan; 21(1):172-180
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Mathilde Lavigne-Robichaud
Jean-Claude Moubarac
Stéfanie Lantagne-Lopez
Louise Johnson-Down
Malek Batal
Elhadji A Laouan Sidi
Michel Lucas
Author Affiliation
1Department of Social & Preventive Medicine,Laval University,Québec,QC,Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 Jan; 21(1):172-180
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Female
Food Quality
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Mental Recall
Metabolic Syndrome - blood - ethnology
Nutrition Assessment
Obesity - blood - ethnology
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
To assess associations between three diet quality indices and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the Cree (Eeyouch) of northern Québec, Canada, as well as to evaluate their pertinence in this Indigenous context.
The alternative-Healthy Eating Index 2010 (aHEI-2010), the Food Quality Score (FQS) and the contribution of ultra-processed products (UPP) to total daily dietary energy intake using the NOVA classification were calculated from 24 h food recalls. MetS was determined with the latest harmonized definition. Logistic regressions assessed the relationship between quintiles of dietary quality scores with MetS and its components.
Study sample from the 2005-2009 cross-sectional Nituuchischaayihititaau Aschii Environment-and-Health Study.
Eeyouch (n 811) from seven James Bay communities (=18 years old).
MetS prevalence was 56·6 % with 95·4 % abdominal adiposity, 50·1 % elevated fasting plasma glucose, 43·4 % hypertension, 38·6 % elevated TAG and 44·5 % reduced HDL cholesterol. Comparing highest and lowest quintiles of scores, adjusted OR (95 % CI) of MetS was 0·70 (0·39, 1·08; P-trend=0·05) for aHEI-2010, 1·06 (0·63, 1·76; P-trend=0·87) for FQS and 1·90 (1·14, 3·17; P-trend=0·04) for the contribution of UPP to total daily dietary energy intake.
Although diet quality indices have been associated with cardiometabolic risk, only the dietary intake of UPP was significantly associated with MetS in the Eeyouch. Indices tailored to the food environment of northern communities are essential to further understand the impact of diet quality in this context.
PubMed ID
28683844 View in PubMed
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Diet quality indices in relation to metabolic syndrome in an Indigenous Cree (Eeyouch) population in northern Québec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283930
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Jul 07;:1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-07-2017
Author
Mathilde Lavigne-Robichaud
Jean-Claude Moubarac
Stéfanie Lantagne-Lopez
Louise Johnson-Down
Malek Batal
Elhadji A Laouan Sidi
Michel Lucas
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Jul 07;:1-9
Date
Jul-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To assess associations between three diet quality indices and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the Cree (Eeyouch) of northern Québec, Canada, as well as to evaluate their pertinence in this Indigenous context.
The alternative-Healthy Eating Index 2010 (aHEI-2010), the Food Quality Score (FQS) and the contribution of ultra-processed products (UPP) to total daily dietary energy intake using the NOVA classification were calculated from 24 h food recalls. MetS was determined with the latest harmonized definition. Logistic regressions assessed the relationship between quintiles of dietary quality scores with MetS and its components.
Study sample from the 2005-2009 cross-sectional Nituuchischaayihititaau Aschii Environment-and-Health Study.
Eeyouch (n 811) from seven James Bay communities (=18 years old).
MetS prevalence was 56·6 % with 95·4 % abdominal adiposity, 50·1 % elevated fasting plasma glucose, 43·4 % hypertension, 38·6 % elevated TAG and 44·5 % reduced HDL cholesterol. Comparing highest and lowest quintiles of scores, adjusted OR (95 % CI) of MetS was 0·70 (0·39, 1·08; P-trend=0·05) for aHEI-2010, 1·06 (0·63, 1·76; P-trend=0·87) for FQS and 1·90 (1·14, 3·17; P-trend=0·04) for the contribution of UPP to total daily dietary energy intake.
Although diet quality indices have been associated with cardiometabolic risk, only the dietary intake of UPP was significantly associated with MetS in the Eeyouch. Indices tailored to the food environment of northern communities are essential to further understand the impact of diet quality in this context.
PubMed ID
28683844 View in PubMed
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Does waist circumference uncorrelated with BMI add valuable information?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263018
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Sep;68(9):849-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Gerard Ngueta
Elhadji A Laouan-Sidi
Michel Lucas
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Sep;68(9):849-55
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Inuits
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Estimation of relative contribution of Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) on health outcomes requires a regression model that includes both obesity metrics. But, multicollinearity could yield biased estimates.
To address the multicollinearity issue between BMI and WC, we used the residual model approach. The standard WC (Y-axis) was regressed on the BMI (X-axis) to obtain residual WC. Data from two adult population surveys (Nunavik Inuit and James Bay Cree) were analysed to evaluate relative effect of BMI and WC on four cardiometabolic risk factors: insulin, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure and high-density lipoprotein levels.
In multivariate models, standard WC and BMI were significantly associated with cardiometabolic outcomes. Residual WC was not linked with any outcomes. The BMI effect was weakened by including standard WC in the model, but its effect remained unchanged if residual WC was considered.
The strong correlation between standard WC and BMI does not allow assessment of their relative contributions to health in the same model without a risk of making erroneous estimations. By contrast with BMI, fat distribution (residual WC) does not add valuable information to a model that already contains overall adiposity (BMI) in Inuit and Cree.
PubMed ID
24915975 View in PubMed
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Erratum: Cannabis use in relation to obesity and insulin resistance in the inuit population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266578
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015 Oct;23(10):2131
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Gerard Ngueta
Richard E Bélanger
Elhadji A Laouan-Sidi
Michel Lucas
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015 Oct;23(10):2131
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
PubMed ID
26414565 View in PubMed
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Household crowding is associated with higher allostatic load among the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257127
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Apr;68(4):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Mylene Riva
Pierrich Plusquellec
Robert-Paul Juster
Elhadji A Laouan-Sidi
Belkacem Abdous
Michel Lucas
Serge Dery
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des populations et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, , Québec, Canada.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Apr;68(4):363-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allostasis - physiology
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Crowding
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Housing - standards
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - ethnology
Abstract
Household crowding is an important problem in some aboriginal communities that is reaching particularly high levels among the circumpolar Inuit. Living in overcrowded conditions may endanger health via stress pathophysiology. This study examines whether higher household crowding is associated with stress-related physiological dysregulations among the Inuit.
Cross-sectional data on 822 Inuit adults were taken from the 2004 Qanuippitaa? How are we? Nunavik Inuit Health Survey. Chronic stress was measured using the concept of allostatic load (AL) representing the multisystemic biological 'wear and tear' of chronic stress. A summary index of AL was constructed using 14 physiological indicators compiled into a traditional count-based index and a binary variable that contrasted people at risk on at least seven physiological indicators. Household crowding was measured using indicators of household size (total number of people and number of children per house) and overcrowding defined as more than one person per room. Data were analysed using weighted Generalised Estimating Equations controlling for participants' age, sex, income, diet and involvement in traditional activities.
Higher household crowding was significantly associated with elevated AL levels and with greater odds of being at risk on at least seven physiological indicators, especially among women and independently of individuals' characteristics.
This study demonstrates that household crowding is a source of chronic stress among the Inuit of Nunavik. Differential housing conditions are shown to be a marker of health inequalities among this population. Housing conditions are a critical public health issue in many aboriginal communities that must be investigated further to inform healthy and sustainable housing strategies.
PubMed ID
24385548 View in PubMed
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The obesity-associated risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality is not lower in Inuit compared to Europeans: A cohort study of Greenlandic Inuit, Nunavik Inuit and Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290673
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2017 10; 265:207-214
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
Pernille Falberg Rønn
Michel Lucas
Elhadji A Laouan Sidi
Maria Tvermosegaard
Gregers Stig Andersen
Torsten Lauritzen
Ulla Toft
Bendix Carstensen
Dirk Lund Christensen
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark; Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark. Electronic address: pernille.falberg.roenn@regionh.dk.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2017 10; 265:207-214
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Weights and Measures
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Denmark
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Greenland
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
Inuit populations have lower levels of cardiometabolic risk factors for the same level of body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) compared to Europeans in cross-sectional studies. We aimed to compare the longitudinal associations of anthropometric measures with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in Inuit and Europeans.
Using pooled data from three population-based studies in Canada, Greenland and Denmark, we conducted a cohort study of 10,033 adult participants (765 Nunavik Inuit, 2960 Greenlandic Inuit and 6308 Europeans). Anthropometric measures collected at baseline included: BMI, WC, waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR), waist-to-height-ratio (WHtR) and a body shape index (ABSI). Information on CVD and death was retrieved from national registers or medical files. Poisson regression analyses were used to calculate incidence rates for CVD and all-cause mortality.
During a median follow-up of 10.5 years, there were 642 CVD events and 594 deaths. Slightly higher absolute incidence rates of CVD for a given anthropometric measure were found in Nunavik Inuit compared with Greenlandic Inuit and the Europeans; however, no cohort interactions were observed. For all-cause mortality, all anthropometric measures were positively associated in the Europeans, but only ABSI in the two Inuit populations. In contrast, BMI and WC were inversely associated with mortality in the two Inuit populations.
Inuit and Europeans have different absolute incidences of CVD and all-cause mortality, but the trends in the associations with the anthropometric measures only differ for all-cause mortality. Previous findings of a lower obesity-associated cardiometabolic risk among Inuit were not confirmed.
PubMed ID
28917159 View in PubMed
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The obesity-associated risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality is not lower in Inuit compared to Europeans: A cohort study of Greenlandic Inuit, Nunavik Inuit and Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285810
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2017 Oct;265:207-214
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Pernille Falberg Rønn
Michel Lucas
Elhadji A Laouan Sidi
Maria Tvermosegaard
Gregers Stig Andersen
Torsten Lauritzen
Ulla Toft
Bendix Carstensen
Dirk Lund Christensen
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2017 Oct;265:207-214
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Inuit populations have lower levels of cardiometabolic risk factors for the same level of body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) compared to Europeans in cross-sectional studies. We aimed to compare the longitudinal associations of anthropometric measures with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in Inuit and Europeans.
Using pooled data from three population-based studies in Canada, Greenland and Denmark, we conducted a cohort study of 10,033 adult participants (765 Nunavik Inuit, 2960 Greenlandic Inuit and 6308 Europeans). Anthropometric measures collected at baseline included: BMI, WC, waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR), waist-to-height-ratio (WHtR) and a body shape index (ABSI). Information on CVD and death was retrieved from national registers or medical files. Poisson regression analyses were used to calculate incidence rates for CVD and all-cause mortality.
During a median follow-up of 10.5 years, there were 642 CVD events and 594 deaths. Slightly higher absolute incidence rates of CVD for a given anthropometric measure were found in Nunavik Inuit compared with Greenlandic Inuit and the Europeans; however, no cohort interactions were observed. For all-cause mortality, all anthropometric measures were positively associated in the Europeans, but only ABSI in the two Inuit populations. In contrast, BMI and WC were inversely associated with mortality in the two Inuit populations.
Inuit and Europeans have different absolute incidences of CVD and all-cause mortality, but the trends in the associations with the anthropometric measures only differ for all-cause mortality. Previous findings of a lower obesity-associated cardiometabolic risk among Inuit were not confirmed.
PubMed ID
28917159 View in PubMed
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Obesity risks: towards an emerging Inuit pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134940
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):166-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Marie-Ludivine Chateau-Degat
Eric Dewailly
Guylaine Charbonneau
Elhadji A Laouan-Sidi
Angelo Tremblay
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition and Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Canada. marie-ludivine.chateau-degat@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):166-77
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Nunavut - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to provide analytical overviews of anthropometric measurements and their relationships with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors within the Inuit population, given that few studies have focused on this issue. Study design. Cross-sectional study.
Anthropometric and biological data were obtained from 867 Inuit participants from Nunavik (=18 years).
Obesity prevalence for men and women, respectively, was 25.1% and 31.3% according to body mass index (BMI: >30 kg/m2); 20.2% and 55.3% according to waist circumference (WC: >102 cm for men and >88 cm for women); 22.4% and 22.5% according to body fat percentage (%BF: =30 in men and =40 in women). There was substantial agreement between anthropometric obesity measurements, except for the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) which showed the lowest agreement with the other measurements. All risk factors were significantly associated with anthropometry. The prevalence of abnormal values for risk factors increased across quartiles of BMI and WC. Among obese participants, as defined by the WC cutoff, 22% had metabolic syndrome based on the National Cholesterol Education Program in the Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) definition and 64.8% of them were also insulin resistant.
Obesity rates among Inuit are high, especially among women. Inuit women display especially high rates of abdominal obesity. Further longitudinal work is needed to evaluate the effects of central and global obesity among Inuit.
PubMed ID
21524362 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.