Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure management guidelines update: focus on sleep apnea, renal dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134302
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
Anson Cheung
Jeannine Costigan
Anique Ducharme
Estrellita Estrella-Holder
Justin A Ezekowitz
John Floras
Nadia Giannetti
Adam Grzeslo
Karen Harkness
George A Heckman
Jonathan G Howlett
Simon Kouz
Kori Leblanc
Elizabeth Mann
Eileen O'Meara
Miroslav Rajda
Vivek Rao
Jessica Simon
Elizabeth Swiggum
Shelley Zieroth
J Malcolm O Arnold
Tom Ashton
Michel D'Astous
Paul Dorian
Haissam Haddad
Debra L Isaac
Marie-Hélène Leblanc
Peter Liu
Bruce Sussex
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. robert.mckelvie@phri.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Palliative Care - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Societies, Medical
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Focused Update reviews the recently published clinical trials that will potentially impact on management. Also reviewed is the less studied but clinically important area of sleep apnea. Finally, patients with advanced HF represent a group of patients who pose major difficulties to clinicians. Advanced HF therefore is examined from the perspectives of HF complicated by renal failure, the role of palliative care, and the role of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). All of these topics are reviewed from a perspective of practical applications. Important new studies have demonstrated in less symptomatic HF patients that cardiac resynchronization therapy will be of benefit. As well, aldosterone receptor antagonists can be used with benefit in less symptomatic HF patients. The important role of palliative care and the need to address end-of-life issues in advanced HF are emphasized. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of sleep apnea complicating the course of HF and the role of a sleep study for the proper assessment and management of the conditon. Patients with either acute severe or chronic advanced HF with otherwise good life expectancy should be referred to a cardiac centre capable of providing MCS. Furthermore, patients awaiting heart transplantation who deteriorate or are otherwise not likely to survive until a donor organ is found should be referred for MCS.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;27(6):871.e721885242
PubMed ID
21601772 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative Imaging Modalities in Ischemic Heart Failure (AIMI-HF) IMAGE HF Project I-A: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108622
Source
Trials. 2013;14:218
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Eileen O'Meara
Lisa M Mielniczuk
George A Wells
Robert A deKemp
Ran Klein
Doug Coyle
Brian Mc Ardle
Ian Paterson
James A White
Malcolm Arnold
Matthias G Friedrich
Eric Larose
Alexander Dick
Benjamin Chow
Carole Dennie
Haissam Haddad
Terrence Ruddy
Heikki Ukkonen
Gerald Wisenberg
Bernard Cantin
Philippe Pibarot
Michael Freeman
Eric Turcotte
Kim Connelly
James Clarke
Kathryn Williams
Normand Racine
Linda Garrard
Jean-Claude Tardif
Jean DaSilva
Juhani Knuuti
Rob Beanlands
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, QC, Canada.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:218
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Heart Arrest - etiology
Heart Failure - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Patient Readmission
Patient Selection
Positron-Emission Tomography
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Registries
Research Design
Time Factors
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the most common cause of heart failure (HF); however, the role of revascularization in these patients is still unclear. Consensus on proper use of cardiac imaging to help determine which candidates should be considered for revascularization has been hindered by the absence of clinical studies that objectively and prospectively compare the prognostic information of each test obtained using both standard and advanced imaging.
This paper describes the design and methods to be used in the Alternative Imaging Modalities in Ischemic Heart Failure (AIMI-HF) multi-center trial. The primary objective is to compare the effect of HF imaging strategies on the composite clinical endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac arrest and re-hospitalization for cardiac causes.In AIMI-HF, patients with HF of ischemic etiology (n = 1,261) will follow HF imaging strategy algorithms according to the question(s) asked by the physicians (for example, Is there ischemia and/or viability?), in agreement with local practices. Patients will be randomized to either standard (SPECT, Single photon emission computed tomography) imaging modalities for ischemia and/or viability or advanced imaging modalities: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or positron emission tomography (PET). In addition, eligible and consenting patients who could not be randomized, but were allocated to standard or advanced imaging based on clinical decisions, will be included in a registry.
AIMI-HF will be the largest randomized trial evaluating the role of standard and advanced imaging modalities in the management of ischemic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. This trial will complement the results of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) viability substudy and the PET and Recovery Following Revascularization (PARR-2) trial. The results will provide policy makers with data to support (or not) further investment in and wider dissemination of alternative 'advanced' imaging technologies.
NCT01288560.
Notes
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2004 May 15;93(10):1275-915135703
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1971 Dec 23;285(26):1441-65122894
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1974 Oct 3;34(5):520-54278154
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1983 Mar 1;51(5):831-66681931
Cites: Circulation. 1983 Oct;68(4):785-956352078
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1983 Oct;86(4):519-276604845
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Jun 27;312(26):1665-713873614
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Apr 3;314(14):884-83485252
Cites: Ann Surg. 1989 Sep;210(3):348-52; discussion 352-42673084
Cites: Circulation. 1990 Nov;82(5):1629-462225367
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Nov;84(5 Suppl):III290-51934422
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993 Oct;22(4):984-978409073
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1994 Mar 15;73(8):527-338147295
Cites: Circulation. 1994 Dec;90(6):2687-947994809
Cites: Circulation. 1998 Nov 10;98(19 Suppl):II51-69852880
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2005 Feb;129(2):246-915678031
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2006 Jan;8(1):63-716084759
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):23-4516450016
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Feb;23(2):107-1917311116
Cites: Curr Probl Cardiol. 2007 Jul;32(7):375-41017560992
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jul;48(7):1135-4617574986
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Nov 13;50(20):2002-1217996568
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2009 Jan;2(1):34-4419356530
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2009 Sep;2(9):1060-819761983
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-7420237039
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2010 Jul 15;106(2):187-9220599001
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1607-1621463150
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1671-321463151
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1617-2521463153
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2012 Mar;5(2):262-70; discussion 27022438424
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Mar 15;37(4):992-711263626
Cites: Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Feb;48(1):9-1410757150
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2012 Jun 5;156(11):785-95, W-270, W-271, W-272, W-273, W-274, W-275, W-276, W-277, W-27822312131
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Apr;37(5):1210-311300424
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2002 Feb;39(2 Suppl 1):S1-26611904577
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Apr 3;39(7):1151-811923039
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Jul 15;139(2):137-4712859163
PubMed ID
23866673 View in PubMed
Less detail

Description and assessment of a common reference method for fluoroscopic and transesophageal echocardiographic localization and guidance of mitral periprosthetic transcatheter leak reduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137751
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jan;4(1):107-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Haïfa Mahjoub
Stéphane Noble
Réda Ibrahim
Jeannot Potvin
Eileen O'Meara
Annie Dore
François Marcotte
Jacques Crépeau
Raoul Bonan
Asmaa Mansour
Denis Bouchard
Anique Ducharme
Arsène J Basmadjian
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute/Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jan;4(1):107-14
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Catheterization
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color - standards
Echocardiography, Transesophageal - standards
Female
Fluoroscopy - standards
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve - radiography - ultrasonography
Mitral Valve Insufficiency - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Observer Variation
Predictive value of tests
Prosthesis Failure
Quebec
Radiography, Interventional - standards
Reference Standards
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Ultrasonography, Interventional - standards
Abstract
This study sought to describe and compare a novel fluoroscopic method and a 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) method to localize mitral periprosthetic leaks (PPLs) for transcatheter reduction.
Transcatheter reduction of significant regurgitation represents a modern and attractive alternative to surgery for the treatment of mitral PPL in high-risk patients. Accurate localization and precise communication between the echocardiographer and the interventional cardiologist are essential for procedural success.
We analyzed TEE and fluoroscopic studies of patients with mitral PPL who underwent multiplane 2-dimensional TEE-guided transcatheter reduction in our institution. Periprosthetic leaks were routinely localized using the "surgeon's-view" time-clock method during periprocedural TEE assessments. The 2-dimensional TEE examinations were later retrospectively reviewed by an echocardiographer blinded to procedural TEE findings. A corresponding surgeon's-view time-clock method was plotted for fluoroscopic PPL localization. Using this fluoroscopic method, offline fluoroscopic images were reviewed by an independent interventional cardiologist blinded to TEE results. Agreement between methods was evaluated.
Complete imaging data were available for analysis in 20 patients who, between 2002 and 2009, underwent transcatheter reduction in which the defect was successfully crossed. There was excellent agreement between procedural TEE and retrospective TEE review for PPL localization (100%; p
PubMed ID
21251637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lack of long-term benefits of a 6-month heart failure disease management program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163440
Source
J Card Fail. 2007 May;13(4):287-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Viviane Nguyen
Anique Ducharme
Michel White
Normand Racine
Eileen O'Meara
Bin Zhang
Jean L Rouleau
James Brophy
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Card Fail. 2007 May;13(4):287-93
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Time
Abstract
Heart failure (HF) represents a major burden on the health care system, causing repeated hospitalizations and numerous emergency department (ED) visits. In a 6-month randomized study of a multidisciplinary HF clinic, we have previously shown decreased hospital readmissions and improved quality of life. Despite these encouraging results, it is unknown if these beneficial effects are sustained.
To assess long-term recurrent ED visits, readmissions, and mortality among HF patients who were discharged after a 6-month intensive HF management program (HFMP). Of the 230 subjects (New York Heart Association Class II-IV) who were initially randomized to standard follow-up care or to a HFMP for 6 months, 190 were studied retrospectively for long-term evaluation. Long-term data was obtained from the Quebec administrative health databases. We compared the intervention and control groups for the number of recurrent ED visits, hospital readmissions, and all-cause deaths. After a mean follow-up of 2.8 +/- 1.7 years, there was no difference in the composite end point of all-cause death, hospital admissions, and ED visits between those patients initially in the HFMP group and the controls. After multivariable adjustment, there was no difference in the composite primary endpoint (HR 1.01, 95% CI: 0.75-1.37) or in the secondary end point of all-cause death alone (HR 1.09, 95%CI:0.69-1.72) between those initially assigned to the HF clinic and those receiving usual care.
For severely ill patients, the clinical and resource benefits of a 6-month HFMP are not sustained upon program cessation. Further research into the benefits of long-term HFMP is required.
PubMed ID
17517349 View in PubMed
Less detail

Left ventricular versus simultaneous biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure and a QRS complex =120 milliseconds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129479
Source
Circulation. 2011 Dec 20;124(25):2874-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2011
Author
Bernard Thibault
Anique Ducharme
François Harel
Michel White
Eileen O'Meara
Marie-Claude Guertin
Joel Lavoie
Nancy Frasure-Smith
Marc Dubuc
Peter Guerra
Laurent Macle
Léna Rivard
Denis Roy
Mario Talajic
Paul Khairy
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, 5000 Belanger St, Montreal, QC, Canada H1T 1C8. ablation2000@bellnet.ca.
Source
Circulation. 2011 Dec 20;124(25):2874-81
Date
Dec-20-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Canada
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy - methods
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Heart Ventricles
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Systole - physiology
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Ventricular Function, Right - physiology
Abstract
Left ventricular (LV) pacing alone may theoretically avoid deleterious effects of right ventricular pacing.
In a multicenter, double-blind, crossover trial, we compared the effects of LV and biventricular (BiV) pacing on exercise tolerance and LV remodeling in patients with an LV ejection fraction =35%, QRS =120 milliseconds, and symptoms of heart failure. A total of 211 patients were recruited from 11 centers. After a run-in period of 2 to 8 weeks, 121 qualifying patients were randomized to LV followed by BiV pacing or vice versa for consecutive 6-month periods. The greatest improvement in New York Heart Association class and 6-minute walk test occurred during the run-in phase before randomization. Exercise duration at 75% of peak Vo(2) (primary outcome) increased from 9.3±6.4 to 14.0±11.9 and 14.3±12.5 minutes with LV and BiV pacing, respectively, with no difference between groups (P=0.4327). LV ejection fraction improved from 24.4±6.3% to 31.9±10.8% and 30.9±9.8% with LV and BiV pacing, respectively, with no difference between groups (P=0.4530). Reductions in LV end-systolic volume were likewise similar (P=0.6788). The proportion of clinical responders (=20% increase in exercise duration) to LV and BiV pacing was 48.0% and 55.1% (P=0.1615). Positive remodeling responses (=15% reduction in LV end-systolic volume) were observed in 46.7% and 55.4% (P=0.0881). Overall, 30.6% of LV nonresponders improved with BiV and 17.1% of BiV nonresponders improved with LV pacing.
LV pacing is not superior to BiV pacing. However, nonresponders to BiV pacing may respond favorably to LV pacing, suggesting a potential role as tiered therapy.
URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00901212.
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2012 Oct 9;126(15):e238; author reply e23923044613
Comment In: Circulation. 2011 Dec 20;124(25):2803-422184041
PubMed ID
22104549 View in PubMed
Less detail

Regional variation in patients and outcomes in the Treatment of Preserved Cardiac Function Heart Failure With an Aldosterone Antagonist (TOPCAT) trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261226
Source
Circulation. 2015 Jan 6;131(1):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-6-2015
Author
Marc A Pfeffer
Brian Claggett
Susan F Assmann
Robin Boineau
Inder S Anand
Nadine Clausell
Akshay S Desai
Rafael Diaz
Jerome L Fleg
Ivan Gordeev
John F Heitner
Eldrin F Lewis
Eileen O'Meara
Jean-Lucien Rouleau
Jeffrey L Probstfield
Tamaz Shaburishvili
Sanjiv J Shah
Scott D Solomon
Nancy K Sweitzer
Sonja M McKinlay
Bertram Pitt
Source
Circulation. 2015 Jan 6;131(1):34-42
Date
Jan-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Creatinine - blood
Double-Blind Method
Female
Georgia (Republic)
Heart Failure - drug therapy - mortality - physiopathology
Humans
Hyperkalemia - epidemiology
Internationality
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists - therapeutic use
North America
Patients
Risk factors
Russia
South America
Spironolactone - therapeutic use
Stroke Volume - physiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Treatment of Preserved Cardiac Function Heart Failure With an Aldosterone Antagonist (TOPCAT) patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction assigned to spironolactone did not achieve a significant reduction in the primary composite outcome (time to cardiovascular death, aborted cardiac arrest, or hospitalization for management of heart failure) compared with patients receiving placebo. In a post hoc analysis, an ˜4-fold difference was identified in this composite event rate between the 1678 patients randomized from Russia and Georgia compared with the 1767 enrolled from the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Argentina (the Americas).
To better understand this regional difference in clinical outcomes, demographic characteristics of these populations and their responses to spironolactone were explored. Patients from Russia/Georgia were younger, had less atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus, but were more likely to have had prior myocardial infarction or a hospitalization for heart failure. Russia/Georgia patients also had lower left ventricular ejection fraction and creatinine but higher diastolic blood pressure (all P
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2015 Jan 6;131(1):7-1025406307
PubMed ID
25406305 View in PubMed
Less detail

Routine versus selective cardiac magnetic resonance in non-ischemic heart failure - OUTSMART-HF: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (IMAGE-HF (heart failure) project 1-B).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258025
Source
Trials. 2013;14:332
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ian Paterson
George A Wells
Justin A Ezekowitz
James A White
Matthias G Friedrich
Lisa M Mielniczuk
Eileen O'Meara
Benjamin Chow
Rob A DeKemp
Ran Klein
Carole Dennie
Alexander Dick
Doug Coyle
Girish Dwivedi
Miroslaw Rajda
Graham A Wright
Mika Laine
Helena Hanninen
Eric Larose
Kim A Connelly
Howard Leong-Poi
Andrew G Howarth
Ross A Davies
Lloyd Duchesne
Seppo Yla-Herttuala
Antti Saraste
Paul Farand
Linda Garrard
Jean-Claude Tardif
Malcolm Arnold
Juhani Knuuti
Rob Beanlands
Kwan L Chan
Author Affiliation
Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. ip3@ualberta.ca.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:332
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Echocardiography, Doppler
Finland
Health Care Costs
Heart Failure - diagnosis - economics - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - economics - methods
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Quality of Life
Research Design
Risk factors
Tertiary Care Centers
Time Factors
Abstract
Imaging has become a routine part of heart failure (HF) investigation. Echocardiography is a first-line test in HF given its availability and it provides valuable diagnostic and prognostic information. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is an emerging clinical tool in the management of patients with non-ischemic heart failure. Current ACC/AHA/CCS/ESC guidelines advocate its role in the detection of a variety of cardiomyopathies but there is a paucity of high quality evidence to support these recommendations.The primary objective of this study is to compare the diagnostic yield of routine cardiac magnetic resonance versus standard care (that is, echocardiography with only selective use of CMR) in patients with non-ischemic heart failure. The primary hypothesisis that the routine use of CMR will lead to a more specific diagnostic characterization of the underlying etiology of non-ischemic heart failure. This will lead to a reduction in the non-specific diagnoses of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and HF with preserved ejection fraction.
Tertiary care sites in Canada and Finland, with dedicated HF and CMR programs, will randomize consecutive patients with new or deteriorating HF to routine CMR or selective CMR. All patients will undergo a standard clinical echocardiogram and the interpreter will assign the most likely HF etiology. Those undergoing CMR will also have a standard examination and will be assigned a HF etiology based upon the findings. The treating physician's impression about non-ischemic HF etiology will be collected following all baseline testing (including echo ± CMR). Patients will be followed annually for 4 years to ascertain clinical outcomes, quality of life and cost. The expected outcome is that the routine CMR arm will have a significantly higher rate of infiltrative, inflammatory, hypertrophic, ischemic and 'other' cardiomyopathy than the selective CMR group.
This study will be the first multicenter randomized, controlled trial evaluating the role of CMR in non-ischemic HF. Non-ischemic HF patients will be randomized to routine CMR in order to determine whether there are any gains over management strategies employing selective CMR utilization. The insight gained from this study should improve appropriate CMR use in HF.
NCT01281384.
Notes
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2012 Nov;5(6):726-3323071146
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Oct 3;48(7):1475-9717010819
Cites: J Magn Reson Imaging. 2001 Mar;13(3):367-7111241808
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Apr 13;342(15):1077-8410760308
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Sep 11;50(11):1097-11417825724
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2007 Oct;28(20):2539-5017428822
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jan;24(1):21-4018209766
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2008 Feb;29(3):339-4718156618
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Apr 22;51(16):1581-718420102
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2008 Jun 15;101(12):1766-7118549856
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Nov 4;52(19):1574-8019007595
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Feb 25;301(8):831-4119244190
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2001 Dec;22(23):2171-911913479
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Dec 18;40(12):2156-6412505229
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Jul 8;108(1):54-912821550
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 6;362(9386):777-8113678871
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Feb 18;43(4):642-814975476
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Mar 16;109(10):1250-814993139
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Nov 15;30(6):1527-339362412
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 Jan;33(1):164-709935024
Cites: Circulation. 2005 Jan 18;111(2):186-9315630027
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 May 17;45(10):1683-9015893188
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Jun 7;45(11):1815-2215936612
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jul;21(9):763-8016082436
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):23-4516450016
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jul 20;355(3):251-916855265
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jul 20;355(3):260-916855266
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2008 Mar;1(2):266-919356437
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Apr 28;53(17):1475-8719389557
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Jan 19;121(2):306-1420048204
Cites: J Card Fail. 2010 Jun;16(6):e1-19420610207
Cites: Heart. 2011 Feb;97(4):287-9421193686
Cites: Circulation. 2011 Sep 20;124(12):1351-6021900085
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Sep 27;58(14):1401-1321939821
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Jul;33(14):1787-84722611136
Cites: J Card Fail. 2012 Aug;18(8):645-5322858081
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Nov 8;296(18):2209-1617090767
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-4517245481
Cites: J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2009;11:519257889
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Aug 1;114(5):397-40316864724
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2006 Oct;27(19):2338-4516963472
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2013 Mar;29(3):260-523010085
PubMed ID
24119686 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.