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Associations of Weight Concerns With Self-Efficacy and Motivation to Quit Smoking: A Population-Based Study Among Finnish Daily Smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270690
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 Sep;17(9):1134-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Eeva-Liisa Tuovinen
Suoma E Saarni
Taru H Kinnunen
Ari Haukkala
Pekka Jousilahti
Kristiina Patja
Jaakko Kaprio
Tellervo Korhonen
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 Sep;17(9):1134-41
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cotinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Self Efficacy
Self Report
Smoking - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Tobacco Use Disorder - psychology
Weight Gain
Abstract
Concerns about weight gain occurring after smoking cessation may affect motivation and self-efficacy towards quitting smoking. We examined associations of smoking-specific weight concerns with smoking cessation motivation and self-efficacy in a population-based cross-sectional sample of daily smokers.
Six-hundred biochemically verified (blood cotinine) current daily smokers comprising 318 men and 282 women aged 25-74 years, were studied as part of the National FINRISK (Finnish Population Survey on Risk Factors on Chronic, Noncommunicable Diseases) study and its DIetary, Lifestyle and Genetic factors in the development of Obesity and Metabolic syndrome (DILGOM) sub-study that was conducted in Finland in 2007. Self-reported scales were used to assess weight concerns, motivation and self-efficacy regarding the cessation of smoking. Multiple regression analyses of concerns about weight in relation to motivation and self-efficacy were conducted with adjustments for sex, age (years), body mass index (BMI, [kg/m(2)]), physical activity (times per week), and further controlled for nicotine dependence (Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence).
Higher levels of weight concerns were associated with lower self-efficacy (ß = -0.07, p
PubMed ID
25542916 View in PubMed
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