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Advanced pubertal growth spurt in subjects born preterm: the Helsinki study of very low birth weight adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138699
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Karoliina Wehkalampi
Petteri Hovi
Leo Dunkel
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, Mannerheimintie 164, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. karoliina.wehkalampi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Feb;96(2):525-33
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Growth - physiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
Male
Menarche - physiology
Parents
Pregnancy
Puberty - physiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Voice - physiology
Abstract
Among people born at term, low birth weight is associated with early puberty. Early maturation may be on the pathway linking low birth weight with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Subjects born preterm with very low birth weight (VLBW;
PubMed ID
21147886 View in PubMed
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Advanced sleep-wake rhythm in adults born prematurely: confirmation by actigraphy-based assessment in the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262758
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Johan Björkqvist
Juulia Paavonen
Sture Andersson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Johan Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Petteri Hovi
Eero Kajantie
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Source
Sleep Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1101-6
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - diagnosis - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested a propensity towards morningness in teenagers and adults born preterm. We set out to study sleep in a subsample from The Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults cohort, with emphasis on sleep timing, duration, and quality. We compared young adults who were born prematurely at very low birth weight (VLBW;?
PubMed ID
24980065 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory blood pressure in young adults with very low birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148247
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Petteri Hovi
Sture Andersson
Katri Räikkönen
Sonja Strang-Karlsson
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Riikka Pyhälä
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. petteri.hovi@helsinki.fi
Source
J Pediatr. 2010 Jan;156(1):54-59.e1
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Young Adult
Abstract
We hypothesized that, as compared with a matched control group born at term, young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW
PubMed ID
19796771 View in PubMed
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Associations between early life stress, self-reported traumatic experiences across the lifespan and leukocyte telomere length in elderly adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258158
Source
Biol Psychol. 2014 Mar;97:35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Katri Savolainen
Johan G Eriksson
Laura Kananen
Eero Kajantie
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Katri Räikkönen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: katri.savolainen@helsinki.fi.
Source
Biol Psychol. 2014 Mar;97:35-42
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety, Separation - psychology
Biological Markers
Cell Aging
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
DNA - genetics
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Parents
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Stress, Psychological - genetics
Telomere - ultrastructure
Telomere Shortening - physiology
War
Wounds and Injuries - psychology
Abstract
Early life stress (ELS) poses a risk for mental disorders and aging-related diseases. Accelerated biological aging, reflected in shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL), may underlie these risks. We examined whether objectively recorded ELS and retrospectively self-reported traumatic experiences across the lifespan are associated with LTL in later adulthood. Of 1486 participants, 215 had been exposed to ELS, namely to temporary separation from both parents in childhood. Participants self-reported emotionally or physically traumatic experiences across the lifespan at a mean age of 63.2 years. LTL was measured using a quantitative PCR method at a mean age of 61.5 years. Separation or self-reported traumatic experiences were not associated with LTL. However, separated participants who self-reported traumatic experiences had shorter LTL. Our results suggest that while ELS or self-reported traumatic experiences are not per se associated with LTL measured decades later, ELS may in combination with self-reported traumatic events be associated with accelerated biological aging.
PubMed ID
24530884 View in PubMed
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Associations Between Self-Reported and Objectively Recorded Early Life Stress, FKBP5 Polymorphisms, and Depressive Symptoms in Midlife.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284243
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 01;80(11):869-877
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Jari Lahti
Heidi Ala-Mikkula
Eero Kajantie
Kadri Haljas
Johan G Eriksson
Katri Räikkönen
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Dec 01;80(11):869-877
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Self Report
Stress, Psychological
Tacrolimus Binding Proteins - genetics
World War II
Abstract
FK506-binding protein 51 is involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FKBP5 gene have been shown to interact with retrospectively self-reported early life stress (ELS) in patients with psychiatric disorders. We examined interactions between three selected FKBP5 SNPs and self-reported and objectively recorded ELS in relation to depressive symptoms in midlife.
This study comprised 1431 Helsinki Birth Cohort Study participants genotyped for FKBP5 SNPs shown to alter cortisol metabolism (rs1360780, rs9470080, and rs9394309). Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at ages 61.5 years (time 1) and 63.4 years (time 2); 165 and 181 participants were separated from their parents in childhood as a result of evacuations during World War II as indicated by self-reports and the Finnish National Archives registry, respectively.
Associations between self-reported and objectively recorded ELS, but not stressful events in midlife, and the mean BDI score (average of time 1 and time 2) or mild to severe BDI scores (10-63 points at time 1 and time 2), or both, were moderated by the FKBP5 variants (p values for interactions .18). Mean BDI scores or odds for having mild to severe BDI scores, or both, increased according to number of minor alleles and haplotypes derived from these alleles in the separated groups, but not in the nonseparated groups.
FKBP5 variations in combination with self-reported and objectively recorded ELS predict more pronounced depressive symptoms in midlife. Our findings confirm previous retrospective findings in a prospective epidemiologic study setting.
PubMed ID
26740367 View in PubMed
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Associations between the five-factor model of personality and leukocyte telomere length in elderly men and women: The Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (HBCS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270481
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2015 Sep;79(3):233-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Katri Savolainen
Johan G Eriksson
Eero Kajantie
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Katri Räikkönen
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2015 Sep;79(3):233-8
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety Disorders
Cell Aging - genetics
Cohort Studies
Extraversion (Psychology)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Leukocytes
Male
Middle Aged
Personality - genetics
Personality Disorders - genetics
Personality Inventory
Telomere Homeostasis
Abstract
Personality traits have been associated with cardiometabolic diseases and mental disorders as well as with longevity. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Accelerated cellular aging may play a role in this process. We studied whether personality traits in late adulthood, as defined in the five-factor model (FFM), were associated with a biomarker of cellular vitality, leukocyte telomere length (LTL).
At a mean age of 63.4 (SD=2.8) years, 1671 (742 men, 929 women) participants from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study filled in the Neuroticism, Extraversion and Openness Personality Inventory (NEO-PI). LTL was measured at a mean age of 61.5 (SD=2.9) years by using a real-time quantitative PCR method.
None of the FFM personality dimensions were significantly associated with the LTL in the analyses of both sexes combined. We however found interaction between sex and agreeableness (B=0.020, 95% CI=.008, 0.032, p=.001) and in the sex-specific analyses, men who scored higher on agreeableness (B=-0.086, 95% CI=-0.155, -0.016, p=.016) and women who scored lower on agreeableness (B=0.074, 95% CI=0.014, 0.134, p=.016) had shorter LTL.
FFM dimensions of personality were not associated with LTL in a sample of elderly individuals. The counterintuitive and sporadic sex specific finding on agreeableness requires replication. Overall our findings suggest that LTL, a biomarker of cellular aging, may not offer insight into the associations between personality, longevity and health.
PubMed ID
25972055 View in PubMed
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Associations of antenatal glucocorticoid exposure with mental health in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309662
Source
Psychol Med. 2020 01; 50(2):247-257
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2020
Author
Elina Wolford
Marius Lahti-Pulkkinen
Polina Girchenko
Jari Lipsanen
Soile Tuovinen
Jari Lahti
Kati Heinonen
Esa Hämäläinen
Eero Kajantie
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Pia M Villa
Hannele Laivuori
Rebecca M Reynolds
Katri Räikkönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Psychol Med. 2020 01; 50(2):247-257
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Betamethasone - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child Behavior Disorders - chemically induced
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - chemically induced
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Abstract
Synthetic glucocorticoids, to enhance fetal maturation, are a standard treatment when preterm birth before 34 gestational weeks is imminent. While morbidity- and mortality-related benefits may outweigh potential neurodevelopmental harms in children born preterm (
PubMed ID
30688183 View in PubMed
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Associations of Fat and Lean Body Mass with Circulating Amino Acids in Older Men and Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309500
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2020 04 17; 75(5):885-891
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-17-2020
Author
Tuija M Mikkola
Minna K Salonen
Eero Kajantie
Hannu Kautiainen
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2020 04 17; 75(5):885-891
Date
04-17-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Amino Acids - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body Composition
Body mass index
Electric Impedance
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Thinness - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Circulating amino acids are potential markers of body composition. Previous studies are mainly limited to middle age and focus on either fat or lean mass, thereby ignoring overall body composition. We investigated the associations of fat and lean body mass with circulating amino acids in older men and women. We studied 594 women and 476 men from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (age 62-74 years). Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to indicate two main body compartments by fat (fat mass/height2) and lean mass indices (lean mass/height2), dichotomized based on sex-specific medians. Eight serum amino acids were quantified using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. General linear models were adjusted for age, smoking, and fasting glucose. Higher lean mass index (LMI) was associated with higher concentrations of branched-chain amino acids in both sexes (p = .001). In men, LMI was also positively associated with tyrosine (p = .006) and inversely with glycine (p
PubMed ID
31095700 View in PubMed
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Behavioural symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in preterm and term children born small and appropriate for gestational age: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138618
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kati Heinonen
Katri Räikkönen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Johan G Eriksson
Dieter Wolke
Aulikki Lano
Author Affiliation
Institute of Behavioral Science, P.O. Box 9, FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. kati.heinonen@helsinki.fi
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2010;10:91
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - psychology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
It remains unclear whether it is more detrimental to be born too early or too small in relation to symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Thus, we tested whether preterm birth and small body size at birth adjusted for gestational age are independently associated with symptoms of ADHD in children.
A longitudinal regional birth cohort study comprising 1535 live-born infants between 03/15/1985 and 03/14/1986 admitted to the neonatal wards and 658 randomly recruited non-admitted infants, in Finland. The present study sample comprised 828 children followed up to 56 months. The association between birth status and parent-rated ADHD symptoms of the child was analysed with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses.
Neither prematurity (birth
Notes
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PubMed ID
21159164 View in PubMed
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Birth size and childhood growth as determinants of physical functioning in older age: the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129768
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Dec 15;174(12):1336-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
Mikaela B von Bonsdorff
Taina Rantanen
Sarianna Sipilä
Minna K Salonen
Eero Kajantie
Clive Osmond
David J P Barker
Johan G Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Centre, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. mikaela.vonbonsdorff@jyu.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Dec 15;174(12):1336-44
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Birth weight
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Growth
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The study reports on the associations of infant and childhood anthropometric measurements, early growth, and the combined effect of birth weight and childhood body mass index with older age physical functioning among 1,999 individuals born in 1934-1944 and belonging to the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. Physical functioning was assessed by the Short Form 36 scale. Anthropometric data from infancy and childhood were retrieved from medical records. The risk of lower Short Form 36 physical functioning at the mean age of 61.6 years was increased for those with birth weight less than 2.5 kg compared with those weighing 3.0-3.5 kg at birth (odds ratio (OR) = 2.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57, 4.72). The gain in weight from birth to age 2 years was associated with decreased risk of lower physical functioning for a 1-standard deviation increase (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75, 0.94). The risk of lower physical functioning was highest for individuals with birth weight in the lowest third and body mass index at 11 years of age in the highest third compared with those whose birth weight was in the middle third and body mass index at age 11 years was in the highest third (OR = 3.08, 95% CI: 1.83, 5.19). The increasing prevalence of obesity at all ages and the aging of populations warrant closer investigation of the role of weight trajectories in old age functional decline.
PubMed ID
22071586 View in PubMed
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121 records – page 1 of 13.