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Asbestos bodies in bronchoalveolar lavage in relation to asbestos bodies and asbestos fibres in lung parenchyma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211977
Source
Eur Respir J. 1996 May;9(5):1000-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
A. Karjalainen
R. Piipari
T. Mäntylä
M. Mönkkönen
M. Nurminen
P. Tukiainen
E. Vanhala
S. Anttila
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1996 May;9(5):1000-5
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - chemistry
Culture Techniques
Finland
Humans
Lung - chemistry
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
In Finland, unlike other countries, anthophyllite asbestos has been widely used due to its domestic production in 1918-1975. In this particular context, the aim of the present study was to analyse the relationship between asbestos bodies (ABs) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the concentration of ABs and the different amphibole asbestos fibres in lung tissue. Sixty five BAL lung tissue sample pairs from patients with pulmonary disease were analysed. The concentration of ABs in BAL fluid and lung tissue was determined with optical microscopy, and the concentration, type and dimensions of asbestos fibres in lung tissue with scanning electron microscopy. There was a significant correlation between the concentrations of ABs in BAL fluid and in lung tissue (r = 0.72; p
PubMed ID
8793463 View in PubMed
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Asbestos exposure and pulmonary fiber concentrations of 300 Finnish urban men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218962
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Feb;20(1):34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
A. Karjalainen
E. Vanhala
P J Karhunen
K. Lalu
A. Penttilä
A. Tossavainen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Feb;20(1):34-41
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - isolation & purification
Asbestosis - mortality - pathology
Cause of Death
Electron Probe Microanalysis
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lung - pathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the pulmonary concentrations of mineral fibers in the Finnish male urban population and to evaluate the analysis of pulmonary fiber burden by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as an indicator of past fiber exposure.
The pulmonary concentration of mineral fibers was determined by SEM and compared with occupational history for a series of 300 autopsies of urban men aged 33 to 69 years.
The concentration of fibers (f) longer than 1 micron ranged from
PubMed ID
8016597 View in PubMed
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Asbestos exposure and the risk of lung cancer in a general urban population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217694
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Aug;20(4):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
A. Karjalainen
S. Anttila
E. Vanhala
H. Vainio
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1994 Aug;20(4):243-50
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Carcinoma - etiology - pathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Urban health
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the asbestos-associated risk of lung cancer according to histological type of cancer, lobe of origin, pulmonary concentration, and type of amphibole fibers and also to estimate the etiologic fraction of asbestos for lung cancer.
The pulmonary concentration of asbestos fibers in 113 surgically treated male lung cancer patients and 297 autopsy cases among men serving as referents was determined by scanning electron microscopy. The age- and smoking-adjusted odds ratios of lung cancer were calculated according to pulmonary fiber concentration for all lung cancer types, squamous-cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma and for the lower-lobe and the upper- and middle-lobe cancers.
The risk of lung cancer was increased according to the pulmonary concentration of asbestos fibers (f) of 1.0 to 4.99 x 10(6) f.g-1 [odds ratio (OR) 1.7] and > or = 5.0 x 10(6) f.g-1 (OR 5.3). The odds ratios associated with fiber concentrations of > or = 1.0 x 10(6) f.g-1 were higher for adenocarcinoma (OR 4.0) than for squamous-cell carcinoma (OR 1.6). The asbestos-associated risk was higher for lower lobe tumors than for upper lobe tumors. The risk estimates for anthophyllite and crocidolite-amosite fibers were similar, except for the risk of squamous-cell carcinoma. An etiologic fraction of 19% was calculated for asbestos among male surgical lung cancer patients in the greater Helsinki area.
Past exposure to asbestos is a significant factor in the etiology of lung cancer in southern Finland. The asbestos-associated risk seems to be higher for pulmonary adenocarcinoma and lower-lobe tumors than for squamous-cell carcinoma and upper-lobe tumors.
PubMed ID
7801069 View in PubMed
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Industrial worker exposure to airborne particles during the packing of pigment and nanoscale titanium dioxide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120163
Source
Inhal Toxicol. 2012 Oct;24(12):839-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
A J Koivisto
J. Lyyränen
A. Auvinen
E. Vanhala
K. Hämeri
T. Tuomi
J. Jokiniemi
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Nanosafety Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland. joonas.koivisto@ttl.fi
Source
Inhal Toxicol. 2012 Oct;24(12):839-49
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Automation
Chemical Industry - manpower - methods
Coloring Agents - administration & dosage - analysis - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Finland
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Lung - chemistry - drug effects - metabolism
Metal Nanoparticles - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Models, Biological
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - administration & dosage - analysis - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Product Packaging
Respiratory Mucosa - chemistry - drug effects - metabolism
Risk Assessment - methods
Soot - administration & dosage - analysis - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Tissue Distribution
Titanium - administration & dosage - analysis - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Abstract
Titanium dioxide (TiO2) factory workers' source specific exposure and dose to airborne particles was studied extensively for particles between 5?nm and 10 µm in size.
We defined TiO2 industry workers' quantitative inhalation exposure levels during the packing of pigment TiO2 (pTiO2) and nanoscale TiO2 (nTiO2) material from concentrations measured at work area.
Particle emissions from different work events were identified by linking work activity with the measured number size distributions and mass concentrations of particles. A lung deposit model was used to calculate regional inhalation dose rates in units of particles min?¹ and µg min?¹ without use of respirators.
Workers' average exposure varied from 225 to 700 µg m?³ and from 1.15?×?104 to 20.1?×?104 cm?4. Over 90% of the particles were smaller than 100?nm. These were mainly soot and particles formed from process chemicals. Mass concentration originated primarily from the packing of pTiO2 and nTiO2 agglomerates. The nTiO2 exposure resulted in a calculated dose rate of 3.6?×?106 min?¹ and 32 µg min?¹ where 70% of the particles and 85% of the mass was deposited in head airways.
The recommended TiO2 exposure limits in mass by NIOSH and in particle number by IFA were not exceeded. We recommend source-specific exposure assessment in order to evaluate the workers' risks. In nTiO2 packing, mass concentration best describes the workers' exposure to nTiO2 agglomerates. Minute dose rates enable the simulation of workers' risks in different exposure scenarios.
PubMed ID
23033997 View in PubMed
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Mineral fiber concentration in lung tissue of mesothelioma patients in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231519
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(3):247-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
T. Tuomi
M. Segerberg-Konttinen
L. Tammilehto
A. Tossavainen
E. Vanhala
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(3):247-54
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects - isolation & purification
Environmental Exposure
Finland
Humans
Lung - analysis
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - pathology
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Middle Aged
Occupations
Abstract
The mineral fibers in lung tissue samples of 19 mesothelioma patients and 15 randomly selected autopsy cases were analyzed using low-temperature ashing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis. The fiber concentration ranged from 0.5 to 370 million fibers per gram of dry tissue in the mesothelioma group and from less than 0.01 to 3.2 million fibers per gram of dry tissue in the autopsy group. In 80% of the mesothelioma patients and in 20% of the autopsy cases, the fiber concentration exceeded 1 million fibers per gram of dry tissue. Amphibole asbestos fibers predominated in both groups, and only a few chrysotile fibers were found. In the lungs of six mesothelioma patients, anthophyllite was the main fiber type. The overall analytical precision of sample preparation and fiber counting with SEM was 22%.
PubMed ID
2782313 View in PubMed
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Pleural plaques and exposure to mineral fibres in a male urban necropsy population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217791
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1994 Jul;51(7):456-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
A. Karjalainen
P J Karhunen
K. Lalu
A. Penttilä
E. Vanhala
P. Kyyrönen
A. Tossavainen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1994 Jul;51(7):456-60
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Asbestos, Amosite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects
Autopsy
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Pleura - pathology
Pleural Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Risk factors
Smoking
Urban Population
Abstract
The study aimed to evaluate the risk of pleural plaques according to the degree of past exposure to asbestos, type of amphibole asbestos, and smoking, as well as to estimate the aetiologic fraction of asbestos as a cause of plaques among urban men.
The occurrence and extent of pleural plaques were recorded at necropsies of 288 urban men aged 33 to 69 years. The pulmonary concentration of asbestos and other mineral fibres was analysed with scanning electron microscopy. The probability of past exposure was estimated from the last occupation.
Pleural plaques were detected in 58% of the cases and their frequency increased with age, probability of past occupational exposure to asbestos, pulmonary concentration of asbestos fibres, and smoking. The risk of both moderate and widespread plaques was raised among asbestos exposed cases, and the risk estimates were higher for widespread plaques than for moderate plaques. The age adjusted risk was higher for high concentrations of crocidolite/amosite fibres than for anthophyllite fibres. The aetiologic fraction of pulmonary concentration of asbestos fibres exceeding 0.1 million fibres/g was 43% for widespread plaques and 24% for all plaques. The median pulmonary concentrations of asbestos fibres were about threefold greater among cases with widespread plaques than among those without plaques. No increased risk of pleural plaques was associated with raised total concentrations of non-asbestos fibres.
The occurrence of pleural plaques correlated closely with past exposure to asbestos. The risk was dependent on the intensity of exposure. Due to methodological difficulties in detecting past exposures to chrysotile and such low exposures that may still pose a risk of plaques, the aetiologic fractions calculated in the study probably underestimate the role of asbestos.
Notes
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Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1990 Aug;88:295-3032272326
Cites: Chest. 1993 Jun;103(6):1854-98404113
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Cites: Scand J Respir Dis. 1978 Oct;59(5):257-63734385
PubMed ID
8044244 View in PubMed
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Pulmonary asbestos bodies and asbestos fibers as indicators of exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212754
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1996 Feb;22(1):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
A. Karjalainen
M. Nurminen
E. Vanhala
H. Vainio
S. Anttila
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1996 Feb;22(1):34-8
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects - analysis
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Abstract
The aim of the study was to analyze the correlation between pulmonary concentrations of asbestos bodies and asbestos fibers and to characterize asbestos body counts from lung tissue of Finnish patients occupationally exposed and unexposed to asbestos.
Ninety-nine surgically treated lung cancer patients were investigated. The number of asbestos bodies in iron-stained 5-micrometers histological lung tissue sections was determined by optical microscopy, and the pulmonary concentration of asbestos fibers was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. The correlation between asbestos body and asbestos fiber counts was calculated with linear regression. The asbestos body and asbestos fiber concentrations were also compared with exposure history according to a personal interview of the patients.
The average number of asbestos bodies ranged from
PubMed ID
8685671 View in PubMed
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Pulmonary mineral fibers after occupational and environmental exposure to asbestos in the Russian chrysotile industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199263
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2000 Apr;37(4):327-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
A. Tossavainen
E. Kovalevsky
E. Vanhala
T. Tuomi
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. atos@occuphealth.fi
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2000 Apr;37(4):327-33
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - analysis
Asbestos, Amosite - analysis
Asbestos, Amphibole - analysis
Asbestos, Crocidolite - analysis
Asbestos, Serpentine
Employment
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Infant
Lung - ultrastructure
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - analysis
Mining
Occupational Exposure
Russia
Abstract
As an indicator of occupational, domestic, and environmental exposure, the level and type of asbestos fibers were determined from lung tissue samples of workers and residents who resided in the area of the world's largest asbestos mine at Asbest, Russia.
Electron microscopy was used to analyze and measure the concentration of asbestos fibers in a series of 47 autopsies at the Asbest Town Hospital. Work histories were obtained from pathology reports and employment records.
In 24 chrysotile miners, millers, and product manufacturers, the pulmonary concentrations of retained fibers (over 1 microm in length) were 0. 8-50.6 million f/g for chrysotile, and
PubMed ID
10706743 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.