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Endovascular surgery for chronic limb ischaemia. Factors predicting immediate outcome on the basis of a nationwide vascular registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194012
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 2001;90(2):86-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
E. Vainio
J P Salenius
M. Lepäntalo
M. Luther
K. Ylönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 2001;90(2):86-91
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease
Female
Finland
Humans
Intermittent Claudication - mortality - surgery
Ischemia - mortality - surgery
Leg - blood supply
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures - methods
Abstract
To evaluate the early results of endovascular treatment of chronic limb ischemia and the factors influencing outcome.
The 5,575 endovascular procedures entered into the national vascular registry in 1991-1994 were reviewed retrospectively. Indication was claudication in 3,873 and chronic critical ischemia (CLI) in 1,702 procedures. In CLI most patients were women and older, with a higher proportion of diabetes mellitus, renal insufficiency and coronary heart disease than in claudication group although the incidence of smoking and hyperlipidaemia was lower. 60.2% of the procedures were performed in femoropopliteal arteries, 24.9% in iliac arteries and 14.9% in infrapopliteal arteries. The follow-up was 30 days.
In the claudication group there was clinical improvement in 2,719 (82.8%) and in the CLI group in 851 (70.9%) of patients. Patency was better in the claudication than in CLI group, 94.6% vs. 89.0% respectively. There was hemodynamic improvement, i.e. improvement of the ankle-brachial index of more than 0.15 in 1,680 (58.2%) patients with claudication and in 437 (59.7%) with CLI. In a logistic regression model diabetes mellitus and renal insufficiency increased the relative risk of amputations and mortality in CLI group, whereas, incidence of amputations was lower in patients with hyperlipidaemia. In claudication group femoropopliteal arteries had an adverse effect on patency.
The clinical characteristics of the groups may explain some of the outcome differences. Angioplasty is recommended to be used in the femoropopliteal arteries if the symptoms are severe and in CLI group with diabetes and renal failure only in selected cases.
PubMed ID
11459264 View in PubMed
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The Finnish evidence-based guideline for open-angle glaucoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50707
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2003 Feb;81(1):3-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
A. Tuulonen
P J Airaksinen
E. Erola
E. Forsman
K. Friberg
M. Kaila
A. Klemetti
M. Mäkelä
P. Oskala
P. Puska
L. Suoranta
H. Teir
H. Uusitalo
E. Vainio-Jylhä
M-L Vuori
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2003 Feb;81(1):3-18
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Chronic Disease
Evidence-Based Medicine
Finland - epidemiology
Glaucoma Drainage Implants
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Intraocular Pressure
Laser Coagulation
Nerve Fibers - pathology
Optic Disk - physiopathology
Optic Nerve Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - prevention & control
Practice Guidelines
Risk factors
Trabeculectomy
Visual Fields
Abstract
In most patients, chronic open-angle glaucoma is a slowly progressive disease. Eyes with very high intraocular pressure (IOP > 30 mmHg) represent an exception to this and should be treated and followed extremely intensively. As lowering IOP is, so far, the only means of treating glaucoma, the majority of research reports deal with the IOP-lowering effect of the treatment. The primary goal of treatment, however, is to prevent glaucomatous damage to the structures and function of the eye. The effectiveness of treatment is monitored with optic disc and retinal nerve fibre layer imaging and with visual field examinations. If the glaucomatous changes are progressing, more effective treatment should be given. In the course of follow-up, it should be noted that the changes in the optic nerve structure and function appear and progress at different time-points with delays of up to several years. The assessment of abnormalities is dependent on the examination method and requires a great deal of experience on the part of the examiner. The important risk factors in glaucoma are elevated IOP (even if IOP is within normal range in half of patients ), age, positive family history, exfoliation, race and myopia.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2003 Feb;81(1):212631013
PubMed ID
12631014 View in PubMed
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The Leu7Pro polymorphism of the signal peptide of neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene is associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers preceding vascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141691
Source
Microvasc Res. 2010 Dec;80(3):433-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
U. Jaakkola
T. Kakko
H. Seppälä
E. Vainio-Jylhä
T. Vahlberg
O T Raitakari
J. Kallio
Author Affiliation
Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku, Tykistökatu 6, Turku, Finland. ulriikka.jaakkola@utu.fi
Source
Microvasc Res. 2010 Dec;80(3):433-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - genetics - immunology
Atherosclerosis - genetics - immunology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Biological Markers - blood - urine
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Creatinine - urine
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - genetics - immunology
Diabetic Angiopathies - genetics - immunology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
E-Selectin - blood
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Insulin Resistance
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Middle Aged
Neuropeptide Y - blood - genetics
Phenotype
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - blood
Polymorphism, Genetic
Protein Sorting Signals - genetics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Serum Amyloid P-Component - metabolism
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Up-Regulation
Vasodilation
Abstract
The Leucine7 to Proline7 (Leu7Pro) polymorphism of the signal peptide of neuropeptide Y (NPY) increases risk for vascular complications in diabetes. Diabetes is associated with low-grade inflammation, which has an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Currently, we followed diabetes patients to investigate, if the Pro7 allele is associated with the inflammation related to atherosclerosis.
In the 5-year follow-up, the genotyped, pair-matched type 2 diabetes patients (12 with the Pro7 allele and 19 without) were investigated using non-invasive ultrasound based methods to measure the development of atherosclerosis (intima media thickness=IMT) and endothelium-dependent (FMD) and -independent nitrate-mediated (NMD) vasodilatation. The development of diabetic complications was followed annually, and the concentrations of inflammatory markers and NPY in plasma were determined.
Patients with the Pro7 had increased U-albumin/creatinine (p=0.037), E-selectin (p=0.016), fasting insulin (p=0.011) and HOMA index (p=0.013) but decreased serum amyloid P concentrations (p=0.021). Furthermore, men with the Pro7 had increased CRP (p=0.010) and NPY (p=0.026) concentrations. IMT and FMD were similar in all patients, however, NMD decreased more during the follow-up in the patients with the Pro7 (p=0.002). NPY correlated positively with bIMT [r 0.04 (SE 0.02), p=0.007] and E-selectin negatively with FMD [r -0.05 (S.E 0.02), p=0.039].
Diabetes patients with the Pro7 allele display increased levels of inflammatory molecules and NPY in blood, preceding vascular wall thickening and impaired endothelial dilatation, especially in male patients.
PubMed ID
20691708 View in PubMed
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Peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori in patients with lichen planus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195414
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2000 Nov-Dec;80(6):427-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Vainio
S. Huovinen
M. Liutu
J. Uksila
R. Leino
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Turku, Finland. eeva.vainio@tyks.fi
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2000 Nov-Dec;80(6):427-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Lichen Planus - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Probability
Reference Values
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The aetiology of lichen planus is unknown, but it is often connected with infections. In recent years peptic ulcer disease has also been closely linked with an infectious agent, Helicobacter pylori. A case-control study was conducted in 78 patients with lichen planus to find out a previous history of peptic ulcer disease, using a questionnaire and a medical record review. Patients were also asked about family history in first- and second-degree relatives. Fifty-seven patients with other skin diseases were interviewed as controls. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with lichen planus was compared to that of 39 patients with other skin diseases and to the overall prevalence rates of H. pylori infection in Finland. Our findings are consistent with an approximately three-fold increased risk of peptic ulcer in patients with chronic/repeating lichen planus, when compared to the control patients (p = 0.04) and also to the overall peptic ulcer prevalence rates in Finland. Forty-one percent of the patients with chronic/repeating lichen planus had a first- or second-degree family member with a peptic ulcer, while the corresponding rate in the control group was only 12% (p=0.003). The prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with chronic/repeating lichen planus and transient lichen planus was not significantly different from that in patients with other skin diseases.
PubMed ID
11243636 View in PubMed
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