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Body size, not sex, is responsible for differences in type of dialysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202523
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):818-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1999
Author
C. Florakas
M. Godwin
R. Morton
R. Wilson
E. Toffelmire
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):818-9
Date
Mar-23-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body constitution
Canada
Female
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - therapy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Peritoneal dialysis
Registries
Renal Dialysis
Sex Characteristics
Notes
Cites: Nephron. 1987;45(4):257-633587465
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1988 Jun;148(6):1305-93288159
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 1994 Apr;4(10):1820-68068881
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Nov 1;151(9):1283-87954176
Cites: Adv Perit Dial. 1994;10:47-517999863
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):828-910189431
PubMed ID
10189427 View in PubMed
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Canadian survey of clinical status at dialysis initiation 1998-1999: a multicenter prospective survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188002
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2002 Oct;58(4):282-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
B M Curtis
B J Barret
K. Jindal
O. Djurdjev
A. Levin
P. Barre
K. Bernstein
P. Blake
E. Carlisle
P. Cartier
C. Clase
B. Culleton
C. Deziel
S. Donnelly
J. Ethier
A. Fine
G. Ganz
M. Goldstein
J. Kappel
G. Karr
S. Langlois
D. Mendelssohn
N. Muirhead
B. Murphy
G. Pylpchuk
E. Toffelmire
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
Clin Nephrol. 2002 Oct;58(4):282-8
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Creatinine - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - metabolism - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Food Habits
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - metabolism - physiopathology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Renal Dialysis
Serum Albumin - metabolism
Treatment Outcome
Urban health
Abstract
The current growth in end-stage kidney disease populations has led to increased efforts to understand the impact of status at dialysis initiation on long-term outcomes. Our main objective was to improve the understanding of current Canadian nephrology practice between October 1998 and December 1999.
Fifteen nephrology centers in 7 provinces participated in a prospective data collection survey. The main outcome of interest was the clinical status at dialysis initiation determined by: residual kidney function, preparedness for chronic dialysis as measured by presence or absence of permanent peritoneal or hemodialysis access, hemoglobin and serum albumin. Uremic symptoms at dialysis initiation were also recorded, however, in some cases these symptom data were obtained retrospectively.
Data on 251 patients during 1-month periods were collected. Patients commenced dialysis at mean calculated creatinine clearance levels of approximately 10 ml/min, with an average of 3 symptoms. 35% of patients starting dialysis had been known to nephrologists for less than 3 months. These patients are more likely to commence without permanent access and with lower hemoglobin and albumin levels. Even of those known to nephrologists, only 66% had permanent access in place.
Patients commencing dialysis in Canada appear to be doing so in relative concordance with published guidelines with respect to timing of initiation. Despite an increased awareness of kidney disease, a substantial number of patients continues to commence dialysis without previous care by a nephrologist. Of those who are seen by nephrologists, clinical and laboratory parameters are suboptimal according to current guidelines. This survey serves as an important baseline for future comparisons after the implementation of educational strategies for referring physicians and nephrologists.
PubMed ID
12400843 View in PubMed
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Differences in the treatment of male and female patients with end-stage renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216964
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Nov 1;151(9):1283-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1994
Author
C. Florakas
R. Wilson
E. Toffelmire
M. Godwin
R. Morton
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Nov 1;151(9):1283-8
Date
Nov-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Kidney Failure, Chronic - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Peritoneal Dialysis - utilization
Registries
Renal Dialysis - utilization
Sex Factors
Abstract
To determine whether there is a difference in the allocation of types of dialysis to male and female patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Descriptive study.
Canada.
All patients registered with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register (CORR) whose treatment began between 1981 and 1991. Data were obtained for 19,732 patients, of whom 18,010 had sufficiently complete data and were being treated with either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis 3 months after the diagnosis of ESRD.
Proportions of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis according to sex.
Significantly more male (58.1%) than female (50.8%) patients were receiving hemodialysis 3 months after diagnosis (p
Notes
Cites: Nephron. 1987;45(4):257-633587465
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1987 Jul;107(1):19-253496029
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1989 Jan-Feb;4(1):23-302644407
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Oct 1;141(7):677-822790603
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Nov;128(5):1016-263189278
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1988 Dec;148(12):2594-6003058072
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1992 Mar;19(3):246-511553969
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1992 May;19(5):414-91585927
Cites: Kidney Int Suppl. 1993 Feb;40:S120-78445833
Cites: CMAJ. 1994 Apr 1;150(7):1099-1058137190
Cites: Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 1993 Nov;2(6):868-757922226
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1983 Jul;3(1):21-66346863
Cites: Transplant Proc. 1990 Jun;22(3):964-52349721
Cites: Adv Perit Dial. 1991;7:54-61680457
Cites: ASAIO Trans. 1989 Jul-Sep;35(3):619-212597551
Cites: Med Care. 1981 Jun;19(6):609-327266112
PubMed ID
7954176 View in PubMed
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End-stage renal disease: factors affecting referral decisions by family physicians in Canada, the United States, and Britain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194194
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2001 Jul;38(1):42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
R. Wilson
M. Godwin
R. Seguin
P. Burrows
P. Caulfield
E. Toffelmire
R. Morton
P. White
M. Rogerson
G. Eisele
G. Bont
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. wilsonrw@post.queensu.ca
Source
Am J Kidney Dis. 2001 Jul;38(1):42-8
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada
Creatinine - metabolism
Decision Making
Dialysis
England
Female
Health status
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians, Family - standards - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Social Class
United States
Abstract
The objective of this study is to determine how patient age, sex, creatinine level, and comorbidity affect referral decisions for the treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and whether these decisions are affected by physician characteristics in three countries: Canada, the United States, and Britain. A vignette-based questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of family physicians in Ontario, Canada (1,818 physicians); all family physicians in the state of New York (1,814 physicians); and a sample of general practitioners from the south of England (2,228 physicians) in 1996. Physicians were presented with clinical scenarios involving a patient with varying degrees of renal insufficiency and a complicating comorbidity, including angina, diabetes, cancer, mental illness, or socioeconomic circumstances. They were asked to indicate the likelihood of referral. Half the physicians received a questionnaire describing a male patient, and half, a female patient. Mean creatinine levels at which physicians would refer were 260 micromol/L for British physicians, 297 micromol/L for Canadian physicians, and 340 micromol/L for American physicians. No difference in referral rates was found based on the sex of the patient or physician. Sixty-five percent of American and Canadian physicians would refer regardless of patient age, but only 49% of British physicians would do so. Family physicians in the United States, Canada, and Britain function as gatekeepers for patients with ESRD. They are less likely to refer based on increasing severity of comorbid conditions. They also discriminate based on age, but not sex.
PubMed ID
11431180 View in PubMed
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Sex differences in renal transplantation in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198367
Source
J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 1999 Jun;8(5):631-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
A. Purdy
R. Wilson
M. Godwin
R. Morton
E. Toffelmire
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Womens Health Gend Based Med. 1999 Jun;8(5):631-5
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cadaver
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prejudice
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Abstract
To determine if a patient's sex influences access to renal transplantation in Canada, transplant recipient data for first cadaveric unrelated renal transplants were obtained from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register (CORR) for the period 1985-1992. There were 4683 first unrelated cadaveric transplant recipients during this time. Differences in the proportion of men and women registered with CORR who received a renal transplant were analyzed. In Canada between 1985 and 1992, 25% of males 40 years and older on dialysis received renal transplants compared with 18% of females (p
PubMed ID
10839649 View in PubMed
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