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Environmental health risk management in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242151
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1983 Mar;3(1):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983
Author
E. Somers
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1983 Mar;3(1):75-81
Date
Mar-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Risk
Abstract
The legislative basis of the federal Canadian government's control of toxic chemicals is described and examples are given of the practical application, ranging from recommendations to a ban on the sale of the product. The ordered sequence of risk assessment and the application of risk estimation techniques are considered. It is clear that the ultimate political decision is not amenable to simplistic scientific analysis, although risk analysis is valuable in defining, rather than solving, the problem.
PubMed ID
6612005 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 1976 Sep-Oct;67 suppl 2:49-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Somers
Source
Can J Public Health. 1976 Sep-Oct;67 suppl 2:49-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental health
Government
Humans
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
PubMed ID
991054 View in PubMed
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Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1987 Mar;7(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1987
Author
E. Somers
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1987 Mar;7(1):35-42
Date
Mar-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Decision Making
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Legislation, Drug
Risk
Abstract
Regulatory agencies require numbers to provide health protection. The manner in which these numbers are derived from animal experiments and human epidemiology is considered together with the limitations and inadequacies of these numbers. Some recent examples of risk assessment in Canada are given including asbestos, drinking water, and indoor air quality. The value of these numbers in providing a measure of the hazard in a wider perspective is stressed, although they can never be the sole determinant of public policy.
PubMed ID
3575796 View in PubMed
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Physical and chemical agents and carcinogenic risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246236
Source
Bull Pan Am Health Organ. 1980;14(2):172-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
E. Somers
Source
Bull Pan Am Health Organ. 1980;14(2):172-84
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental - standards
Humans
Risk
PubMed ID
7417743 View in PubMed
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Risk assessment for environmental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246683
Source
Can J Public Health. 1979 Nov-Dec;70(6):388-92
Publication Type
Article
Source
Drug Saf. 1990;5 Suppl 1:149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
E. Somers
Author Affiliation
Health Protection Branch, Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Drug Saf. 1990;5 Suppl 1:149-54
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy
Canada
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Risk
Abstract
The value of risk-benefit analysis for drugs is outlined with emphasis on its special qualities compared with decisions on environmental agents, occupational risks and other societal risks. Consideration is given to the issue of risk perception and examples given of risk assessment in practice in Canada for Bendectin, isotretinoin, bovine somatropin (somatotrophin) and oral contraceptives. The changes in regulatory approaches for AIDS drugs are noted. It is suggested that an understanding of the risk-benefit balance should be incorporated into the drug evaluation process, perhaps eventually by the use of quality-of-life measures.
PubMed ID
2182058 View in PubMed
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Risk estimation for environmental chemicals as a basis for decision making.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240470
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1984 Jun;4(2):99-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1984
Author
E. Somers
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1984 Jun;4(2):99-106
Date
Jun-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making
Dioxins - adverse effects
Environmental health
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Flame Retardants - adverse effects
Formaldehyde - adverse effects
Government Agencies
Humans
Lead - adverse effects
Legislation as Topic
Organophosphates - adverse effects
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - adverse effects
Risk
Urea - adverse effects
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects
Abstract
An account is given of the manner in which regulatory decisions for a number of environmental chemicals have been made in Canada. The sources of evidence for such decisions are reviewed and applied to tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate, drinking water contaminants, polychlorinated biphenyls, lead, dioxins, and urea-formaldehyde foam insulation. Finally, the societal implications of too mechanistic an approach to risk estimations are considered.
PubMed ID
6429742 View in PubMed
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The weight of evidence: regulatory toxicology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236214
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1986 Dec;6(4):391-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
E. Somers
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 1986 Dec;6(4):391-8
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amaranth Dye - toxicity
Animals
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Formaldehyde - toxicity
Health Policy
Humans
Lead - toxicity
Legislation, Drug
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Radiation monitoring
Saccharin - toxicity
Toxicology
Urea - toxicity
Abstract
The legislative application of regulatory toxicology in Canada is reviewed, together with the sources of experimental evidence used for action. Examples are given of the critical toxicological information that led to a regulatory decision. Risk numbers have only been used to a limited extent in Canada. Some possibilities for future research are offered.
PubMed ID
3809617 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.