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An increased level of antibodies to beta-lactoglobulin is a risk determinant for early-onset type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus independent of islet cell antibodies and early introduction of cow's milk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36580
Source
Diabetologia. 1992 Oct;35(10):980-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
G. Dahlquist
E. Savilahti
M. Landin-Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 1992 Oct;35(10):980-4
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies - analysis - immunology
Autoantibodies - analysis - immunology
Biological Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Lactoglobulins - immunology
Male
Milk - immunology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Using a case-control design we have studied whether antibodies to cow's milk proteins are risk determinants for childhood-onset Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus independent of early exposure to cow's milk formula and islet cell antibodies. Sera from 116 recent-onset diabetic children and 112 age- and sex-matched control children were analysed for cow's milk protein IgA, IgG and IgM antibodies, beta-lactoglobulin IgA and IgM antibodies and islet cell antibodies. The titres were compared to questionnaire data on duration of breast-feeding and introduction of formula feeding. Most antibody levels tended to be increased among diabetic compared to control children. This was statistically significant for cow's milk protein IgA antibodies (p less than 0.001) and beta-lactoglobulin IgA antibodies (p less than 0.01) as well as for islet cell antibody-positivity which was found among 92% of the diabetic and 3% of control children. The differences in cow's milk protein antibodies as well as beta-lactoglobulin antibodies were more pronounced among children with an early onset of Type 1 diabetes. Breast-feeding duration was significantly inversely related to the log of beta-lactoglobulin IgG (r = -0.16, p = 0.04) and the log of cow's milk protein IgA antibodies (r = -0.17, p less than 0.001). A positive correlation was found between formula feeding and the logarithm of beta-lactoglobulin IgG antibodies (r = 0.22, p = 0.01) and the log of cow's milk protein IgA antibodies (r = 0.16, p = 0.04).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Notes
Comment In: Diabetologia. 1993 Jul;36(7):683-48359589
PubMed ID
1451957 View in PubMed
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Antibodies to gliadin in children with coeliac disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225321
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Dec;80(12):1200-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
J. Rautonen
N. Rautonen
E. Savilahti
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Dec;80(12):1200-6
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Antibodies - blood
Celiac Disease - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Finland - epidemiology
Gliadin - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - classification - immunology
Infant
Lactoglobulins - immunology
Mass Screening
Ovalbumin - immunology
Radioimmunoassay - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
We have measured antibodies to gliadin (AGA), bovine beta-lactoglobulin, and chicken egg ovalbumin with a four-layer solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) in 62 children and adolescents with coeliac disease and in 36 healthy controls. The geometric mean titre of IgG AGA in patients at initial diagnosis was more than 100-fold that of controls (p less than 0.0001). Even patients on gluten-free diet had significantly higher IgG AGA titres than the controls (p = 0.0001), the difference being more than 5-fold. All the 42 patients with active disease (30 at initial diagnosis and 12 after gluten challenge) had their IgG AGA titre above 1,000, as compared with 2 (5.7%) of the 35 controls (p less than 0.0001). Both IgG and IgA AGA were quite sensitive and specific in identifying children with coeliac disease; the sensitivities for IgG and IgA AGA were 100% and 95.2%, the specificities 94.3% and 97.2%, respectively. We conclude that determination of IgG and IgA AGA with RIA is suitable for monitoring dietary compliance in children with coeliac disease, and the method is sensitive and specific for screening for coeliac disease in children.
PubMed ID
1785292 View in PubMed
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Assignment of the locus for congenital lactase deficiency to 2q21, in the vicinity of but separate from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204406
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Oct;63(4):1078-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
I. Järvelä
N S Enattah
J. Kokkonen
T. Varilo
E. Savilahti
L. Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Molecular Genetics, National Public Health Institute, Finland. Irma.Jarvela@ktl.fi
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Oct;63(4):1078-85
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2
Female
Finland
Genetic markers
Geography
Haplotypes
Humans
Lactase
Lactase-Phlorizin Hydrolase
Lactose Intolerance - genetics
Likelihood Functions
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lod Score
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
beta-Galactosidase - deficiency
Abstract
Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is an autosomal recessive, gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea starting during the first 1-10 d of life, in infants fed lactose-containing milks. Since 1966, 42 patients have been diagnosed in Finland. CLD is the most severe form of lactase deficiency, with an almost total lack of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) activity on jejunal biopsy. In adult-type hypolactasia, the most common genetic enzyme deficiency in humans, this enzyme activity is reduced to 5%-10%. Although the activity of intestinal LPH has been found to be greatly reduced in both forms, the molecular pathogenesis of lactase deficiencies is unknown. On the basis of the initial candidate-gene approach, we assigned the CLD locus to an 8-cM interval on chromosome 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. At the closest marker locus, a specific allele 2 was present in 92% of disease alleles. On the basis of a genealogical study, the CLD mutation was found to be enriched in sparsely populated eastern and northern Finland, because of a founder effect. The results of both the genealogical study and the haplotype analysis indicate that one major mutation in a novel gene causes CLD in the Finnish population. Consequently, the critical region could be restricted further, to an approximately 350-kb interval, by ancient-haplotype and linkage-disequilibrium analyses. Surprisingly, the LPH gene was shown to lie outside the critical CLD region, excluding it as a causative gene for CLD. The LPH locus was found to reside >2 Mb from the critical CLD region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9758622 View in PubMed
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Atypical intestinal alpha-chain disease evolving into selective immunoglobulin a deficiency in a Finnish boy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245234
Source
Gastroenterology. 1980 Dec;79(6):1303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1980
Author
E. Savilahti
P. Brandtzaeg
P. Kuitunen
Source
Gastroenterology. 1980 Dec;79(6):1303-10
Date
Dec-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Colonic Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Disease Susceptibility
Dysgammaglobulinemia - complications - diagnosis
Finland
Heavy Chain Disease - diagnosis - etiology
Humans
IgA Deficiency
Ileal Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Immunoglobulin alpha-Chains
Jejunal Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Male
Abstract
The clinical course of alpha-chain disease in a Finnish boy is described. The disease presented with growth retardation and gastrointestinal symptoms at age 10 yr. Tests performed between the ages of 15 and 21 yr showed varying intestinal involvement including the large bowel, ileum, and distal jejunum. Alpha-chain disease protein was present in serum in fluctuating concentrations for at least 5 yr; it was produced by plasmacytoid cells found in the affected parts of the large bowel mucosa. The patient was treated with sulfasalazine and melphalan, but it is not clear that the clinical remission and the subsequent disappearance of the alpha-chain disease protein should be ascribed to this treatment. Concomitant with the normalization of the condition, a selective immunoglobulin A deficiency became apparent. The possibility is raised that an immunoglobulin A deficiency could have been the original defect in the patient, predisposing to intestinal infections; topical overstimulation of a defective immunoglobulin A system due to impaired mucosal defense might thus have explained the emergence of alpha-chain disease cells in the gut.
PubMed ID
6777236 View in PubMed
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Changing pattern of cow's milk intolerance. An analysis of the occurrence and clinical course in the 60s and mid-70s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245000
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1981;70(3):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
M. Verkasalo
P. Kuitunen
E. Savilahti
A. Tiilikainen
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1981;70(3):289-95
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Milk - adverse effects
Abstract
The rapid changeover to commercial adapted infant formulae which took place in Finland between 1973 and 1975 was studied as a factor in the occurrence of severe intestinal cow's milk intolerance (CMI). Of infants treated for CMI in 1962-73, ninety-three percent (25/27) were on homemade or unadapted formulae. The admission rate for CMI in these years was 0.22/1 000 liveborn infants breast fed less than six months. During 1974-77 the corresponding figure was 0.56, with 85% of the patients (18/26) on adapted cow's milk formulae. The patients treated before 1974 had a longer symptomatic period before admission, greater growth retardation and more severe intestinal damage than those seen during and after 1974. This is believed to reflect mainly the increasing awareness of CMI on the part of both laymen and the medical profession. In the history of 2/3 of the patients at least one of the following conditions was noted: non-breast feeding, infectious gastroenteritis, praematurity, 21-trisomy, prior intra-abdominal surgery, Hirschsprung's disease, and atopic disease in family members. The long follow-up averaging over four years revealed four patients with coeliac disease. In one of these the proximal jejunal mucosa was normal after two years on gluten-containing diet, but he showed a mucosal relapse as late as between 2 to 4 years on normal diet.
PubMed ID
7195640 View in PubMed
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Childhood BMI in relation to microbiota in infancy and lifetime antibiotic use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283486
Source
Microbiome. 2017 Mar 03;5(1):26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-03-2017
Author
K. Korpela
M A C Zijlmans
M. Kuitunen
K. Kukkonen
E. Savilahti
A. Salonen
C. de Weerth
W M de Vos
Source
Microbiome. 2017 Mar 03;5(1):26
Date
Mar-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bacterial Load - drug effects
Bacteroides - isolation & purification
Bifidobacterium - isolation & purification
Body mass index
Body Weight - drug effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Finland
Gastrointestinal Microbiome - drug effects
Humans
Infant
Netherlands
Overweight
Streptococcus - isolation & purification
Weight Gain - drug effects
Abstract
Children with high body mass index (BMI) at preschool age are at risk of developing obesity. Early identification of factors that increase the risk of excessive weight gain could help direct preventive actions. The intestinal microbiota and antibiotic use have been identified as potential modulators of early metabolic programming and weight development. To test if the early microbiota composition is associated with later BMI, and if antibiotic use modifies this association, we analysed the faecal microbiota composition at 3?months and the BMI at 5-6?years in two cohorts of healthy children born vaginally at term in the Netherlands (N?=?87) and Finland (N?=?75). We obtained lifetime antibiotic use records and measured weight and height of all children.
The relative abundance of streptococci was positively and the relative abundance of bifidobacteria negatively associated with the BMI outcome. The association was especially strong among children with a history of antibiotic use. Bacteroides relative abundance was associated with BMI only in the children with minimal lifetime antibiotic exposure.
The intestinal microbiota of infants are predictive of later BMI and may serve as an early indicator of obesity risk. Bifidobacteria and streptococci, which are indicators of microbiota maturation in infants, are likely candidates for metabolic programming of infants, and their influence on BMI appears to depend on later antibiotic use.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28253911 View in PubMed
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Children with newly diagnosed IDDM have increased levels of antibodies to bovine serum albumin but not to ovalbumin. Childhood Diabetes in Finland Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217402
Source
Diabetes Care. 1994 Sep;17(9):970-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
T. Saukkonen
E. Savilahti
O. Vaarala
E T Virtala
J. Tuomilehto
H K Akerblom
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1994 Sep;17(9):970-6
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies - analysis - immunology
Antibody formation
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoblotting
Immunoglobulin A - analysis - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - analysis - immunology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Ovalbumin - immunology
Serum Albumin, Bovine - immunology
Abstract
To study the humoral immune response to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OA) in children with newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).
We examined serum samples from 505 children 0.8-14.9 years of age with newly diagnosed IDDM for antibodies to BSA and OA by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We also had two control groups: 85 unrelated control children (0.8-7.1 years of age) and 395 nondiabetic siblings (3.0-14.9 years of age). The specificity of antibodies detected in ELISA was confirmed by immunoblotting in a subset of sera with varying levels of antibodies.
Diabetic children
PubMed ID
7988317 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.