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21 records – page 1 of 3.

Assessment of triethylamine and diethylamine emission from military gas mask canisters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204659
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1998 Jul;42(5):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
D K Verma
J G Pagotto
D S Shaw
K. Destombe
E. Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Health Laboratory, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1998 Jul;42(5):325-30
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diethylamines
Ethylamines
Filtration
Humans
Military Medicine
Occupational Exposure
Respiratory Protective Devices
Abstract
A study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of four types of amine modified charcoal filter canisters (cartridge) for use with gas masks (respirators) by measuring emissions of triethylamine (TEA) and diethylamine (DEA). Sampling and analysis methods for TEA and DEA were validated and optimized to ensure accurate measurement at low levels. A total of 88 air samples were taken by the validated methods to measure concentrations of TEA and DEA emitted from gas mask canisters during simulated use in an environmental chamber. Samples were collected on a mannequin equipped with a breather pump and also on human volunteers. Very low levels of TEA and moderately low levels of DEA emissions were measured during the simulations. The C7 (KOH-TEA-BPL/ASC3T) gas mask canister giving the lowest emission has been selected for use by the Canadian Forces. The potential health hazard from TEA and DEA for soldiers using the gas masks, under normal conditions, based on estimated use of one to two days per month, for a maximum of 4 hours/day for a normal working lifetime, was considered to be minimal and acceptable.
PubMed ID
9729920 View in PubMed
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Blood lead and cadmium and birth weight among sub-arctic and arctic populations of Norway and Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4523
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 Nov;78(10):852-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
J O Odland
E. Nieboer
N. Romanova
Y. Thomassen
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 Nov;78(10):852-60
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Birth weight
Cadmium - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Lead - blood
Linear Models
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Delivering women and their newborns in the Kola Peninsula of Russia and the neighboring arctic area of Norway were studied to explore relationships between maternal cadmium and lead status and birth weight as a pregnancy outcome. METHODS: Life-style information, maternal blood and cord blood specimens were collected from 50 consecutive mother-infant pairs from hospital delivery departments in three Russian and three Norwegian communities. Pregnancy outcomes were verified by consulting medical records. Lead and cadmium were determined in the blood samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. RESULTS: The median blood-cadmium concentration for the Russian mothers was 2.2 nmol/L (n = 148) versus 1.8 nmol/L in the Norwegian group (n = 114, p = 0.55). A weak association was observed between maternal cadmium and amount smoked (r = 0.30, p
PubMed ID
10577613 View in PubMed
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Combining data sets of organochlorines (OCs) in human plasma for the Russian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149624
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2009 Sep 15;407(19):5216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2009
Author
T M Sandanger
E E Anda
A A Dudarev
E. Nieboer
A V Konoplev
S V Vlasov
J-P Weber
J Ø Odland
V P Chashchin
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Air Research (NILU), Polar Environmental Centre, NO-9296 Tromsø, Norway. tsa@nilu.no
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2009 Sep 15;407(19):5216-22
Date
Sep-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
DDT - blood
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Geography
Hexachlorobenzene - blood
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Lindane - blood
Male
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Russia
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
As part of AMAP's human circumpolar study of POPs, an international effort was initiated to extend coverage to communities across the Russian Arctic. Two additional laboratories were invited to join the analytical component of this effort, resulting in four participating analytical centres. Although quality assurance measures were put in place, and the level of performance of the laboratories was generally acceptable, deficiencies in the analytical protocols used were recognized subsequent to the collection and analyses of the plasma specimens. The current paper describes the criteria employed to critically appraise the four data bases and guide their integration into a single data set. Summary statistics are presented for plasma concentrations of major PCBs, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, beta-HCH, and HCB for communities/regions across the arctic/subarctic Russian continent, and for one community located in the Aral Sea area of Uzbekistan (a control group). Highly exposed people were identified in the coastal communities of Chukotka, which appears mainly related to marine mammal intake, but recent pesticide use is also suspected. Other communities with intermediate levels of PCBs had relatively elevated beta-HCH, p,p'-DDT and HCB concentrations and low DDE/DDT ratios (
PubMed ID
19608216 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of essential trace elements in maternal serum and the effect on birth weight and newborn body mass index in sub-arctic and arctic populations of Norway and Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4529
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 Aug;78(7):605-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
J O Odland
E. Nieboer
N. Romanova
Y. Thomassen
J. Brox
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 Aug;78(7):605-14
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Birth weight
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn - physiology
Norway
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia
Trace Elements - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This project is part of an assessment of the impact of environmental factors on human health in the Kola Peninsula of Russia and the neighboring arctic area of Norway. Pregnant women and their newborns were studied to explore a relationship between maternal status of essential metals and birth weight. METHODS: Life-style information and serum specimens were collected from at least 50 consecutive mother-infant pairs from hospital delivery departments in three Russian and three Norwegian communities (N=151 and 167, respectively). Pregnancy outcomes were verified by consulting medical records. Copper, selenium and zinc in serum were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry and ferritin by an automated analyzer method. RESULTS: Mean birth weight and child's body mass index (BMIC) were significantly lower in the Russian group (p
PubMed ID
10422907 View in PubMed
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Critical evaluation of medical, statistical, and occupational data sources in the Kola Peninsula of Russia pertinent to reproductive health studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201634
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1999 May;72(3):151-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
J O Odland
V P Tchachtchine
V. Bykov
P E Fiskebeck
E. Lund
Y. Thomassen
E. Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. joodland@online.no
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1999 May;72(3):151-60
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metallurgy
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproduction - drug effects
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The feasibility study described herein was prompted by a report in 1992 of possible reproductive and developmental health concerns among female workers in a Russian nickel refinery.
The primary goal was to ascertain whether medical, statistical, and occupational data bases could be accessed for information about the pregnancy histories, occupational histories, and life-style factors of the women affected.
The project was facilitated by construction of a registry of all births in three towns with a nickel refinery and verification of its contents against patients' records obtained from hospital delivery and gynecology departments and community polyclinics. Municipal Registration Board, Regional Health Statistics Board, and nickel company records were also reviewed.
Reproductive/developmental outcome information and workplace histories were acceptable. Sample-size calculations indicated that a cohort or cross-sectional study would be amenable and suitable for the detection of an excess risk for spontaneous abortion with adequate statistical significance and power. Such investigations would need to be supplemented by workplace environmental/biological monitoring assessments for evaluation of exposure to occupational hazardous factors and a worker's questionnaire to obtain information about life-style factors. A case-control design is recommended for the study of congenital defects.
A well-designed, comprehensive epidemiology study is technically feasible because of the availability of a favorable pool of study subjects, reproductive/developmental outcome data, information to control for major confounders, and suitable occupational records.
PubMed ID
10392562 View in PubMed
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Dentine-lead levels and dental caries in First Nation children from the western James Bay region of northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186605
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2003 Mar;70(3):409-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
L J S Tsuji
J D Karagatzides
R M Hanning
B. Katapatuk
J. Young
E. Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, 200 University Avenue West, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada.
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2003 Mar;70(3):409-14
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Dentin - chemistry
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Lead - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
PubMed ID
12592511 View in PubMed
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A detailed comparison of perinatal mortality between Northern Norway and Murmansk Country (Russia)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284511
Source
Pages 232-233 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
A DETAILED COMPARISON OF PERINATAL MORTALITY BETWEEN NORTHERN NORWAY AND MURMANSK COUNTRY (RUSSIA) E. Anda, E. Nieboer, T. Wilsgaard, A.A. Kovalenko, J.Y. Odland University of Tromsei Objectives: To explore perinatal mortality (PM) related to birth weight, gestational age, optimal birth
  1 document  
Author
E. Anda
E. Nieboer
T. Wilsgaard
A.A. Kovalenko
J.Y. Odland
Author Affiliation
University of Tromso
Source
Pages 232-233 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 6. Maternal and Child Health.
Documents
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Dissolution of lead pellets in saliva: a source of lead exposure in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192345
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2002 Jan;68(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
L J S Tsuji
G G Fletcher
E. Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada.
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2002 Jan;68(1):1-7
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure
Female
Firearms
Humans
Indians, North American
Lead - analysis - chemistry
Male
Ontario
Saliva - chemistry
Solubility
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
PubMed ID
11731824 View in PubMed
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Elevated blood-lead levels in first nation people of Northern Ontario Canada: policy implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160979
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2008 Jan;80(1):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
L J S Tsuji
B C Wainman
I D Martin
J-P Weber
C. Sutherland
E N Liberda
E. Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, 200 University Ave. West, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ljtsuji@fes.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2008 Jan;80(1):14-8
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Birds
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Inuits
Lead - blood
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
We evaluated the preliminary impact of the Canadian "non-toxic" shotshell policy, for the hunting of migratory game birds, by examining blood-lead levels of First Nations people living in sub-arctic Canada. If the use of lead shotshell was the major source of lead exposure as has been postulated and the ban on the use of lead shotshell for hunting migratory birds was immediately effective, we would expect that blood-lead levels would be typical of a geographic area remote from industrialization. Our findings present some concern in that approximately 18% of the 196 First Nations people examined had blood-lead levels > or =100 microg/L.
PubMed ID
17917695 View in PubMed
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Elevated dentine lead levels in adult teeth of First Nation people from an isolated region of northern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207136
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 1997 Dec;59(6):854-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
L J Tsuji
E. Nieboer
J D Karagatzides
D R Kozlovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, York University, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 1997 Dec;59(6):854-60
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - metabolism
Dentin - chemistry
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Lead - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Sex Characteristics
Tooth - chemistry
PubMed ID
9400653 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.