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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Alcohol and substance abuse, depression and suicide attempts after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281902
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
O. Backman
D. Stockeld
F. Rasmussen
E. Näslund
R. Marsk
Source
Br J Surg. 2016 Sep;103(10):1336-42
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass - psychology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Small studies suggest that subjects who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of suicide, alcohol and substance use disorders. This population-based cohort study aimed to assess the incidence of treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and attempted suicide after primary Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB).
All patients who underwent primary RYGB in Sweden between 2001 and 2010 were included. Incidence of hospital admission for alcohol and substance use disorders, depression and suicide attempt was measured, along with the number of drugs prescribed. This cohort was compared with a large age-matched, non-obese reference cohort based on the Swedish population. Inpatient care and prescribed drugs registers were used.
Before RYGB surgery, women, but not men, were at higher risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use disorder compared with the reference cohort. After surgery, this was the case for both sexes. The risk of being diagnosed and treated for depression remained raised after surgery. Suicide attempts were significantly increased after RYGB. The adjusted hazard ratio for attempted suicide in the RYGB cohort after surgery compared with the general non-obese population was 2·85 (95 per cent c.i. 2·40 to 3·39).
Patients who have undergone RYGB are at an increased risk of being diagnosed with alcohol and substance use, with an increased rate of attempted suicide compared with a non-obese general population cohort.
PubMed ID
27467694 View in PubMed
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[A report on final results of inguinal hernia surgery. Examine the patient two years after surgery!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75072
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Aug 7;93(32-33):2732-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-1996
Author
E. Näslund
R. Erwald
L. Forsgren
Author Affiliation
Enheten för kirurgi, Karolinska institutet vid Danderyds sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Aug 7;93(32-33):2732-4
Date
Aug-7-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Follow-Up Studies
Hernia, Inguinal - diagnosis - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Recurrence
Sweden
PubMed ID
8765593 View in PubMed
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Association between cholecystectomy and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19586
Source
Gastroenterology. 2001 Sep;121(3):548-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
J. Freedman
W. Ye
E. Näslund
J. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. jacob.freedman@kir.ds.sll.se
Source
Gastroenterology. 2001 Sep;121(3):548-53
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - surgery
Aged
Bile
Cholecystectomy - statistics & numerical data
Cholelithiasis - epidemiology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Duodenogastric Reflux - epidemiology - surgery
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Barrett's esophagus, which is linked to adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, is associated with reflux of bile. Duodenogastric reflux is increased after cholecystectomy. This study aims to evaluate if cholecystectomy is associated with an increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. METHODS: A population-based cohort study of cholecystectomized patients in Sweden between 1965 and 1997 cross-linked with the Swedish Cancer Register. RESULTS: Cholecystectomized patients had an increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-1.8). Esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma was not found to be associated with cholecystectomy (SIR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.7-1.1). Patients with gallstone disease on whom surgery was not performed did not have an increased risk of adenocarcinoma or squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus. CONCLUSIONS: Cholecystectomy is associated with a moderately increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, possibly by the toxic effect of refluxed duodenal juice on the esophageal mucosa. Further studies are needed regarding the link between bile reflux and esophageal carcinogenesis.
PubMed ID
11522738 View in PubMed
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Bariatric surgery reduces mortality in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97613
Source
Br J Surg. 2010 Jun;97(6):877-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
R. Marsk
E. Näslund
J. Freedman
P. Tynelius
F. Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm, Sweden. Richard.Marsk@ds.se
Source
Br J Surg. 2010 Jun;97(6):877-83
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - mortality
Body mass index
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Obesity, Morbid - mortality - surgery
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mortality is lower in obese patients who have undergone surgery for obesity than in those who have not. The majority of patients in these studies have been women. Perioperative mortality is known to be higher among men, and this may counterbalance the survival advantage seen after surgery. This cohort study compared mortality among operated obese patients, non-operated obese patients and a general control cohort of men. METHODS: The study was based on record linkage between Swedish registries. An operated obese, a non-operated obese and a general control cohort were created. The two non-operated cohorts were assigned pseudosurgery dates. Data regarding preoperative and postoperative morbidity were collected, as well as mortality data. RESULTS: Hazard ratios were calculated for mortality between the cohorts adjusting for preoperative morbidity and age. Comparison of all-cause mortality for the obese surgical and non-surgical cohorts gave an adjusted mortality risk of 0.7 (95 per cent confidence interval (c.i.) 0.5 to 1.0) (P = 0.039); the adjusted mortality risk was 1.5 (95 per cent c.i. 1.1 to 2.0) (P = 0.011) when the obese surgical cohort was compared with the general control cohort. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery reduces overall mortality in obese men.
PubMed ID
20309894 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer in women over 75 years: is axillary dissection always necessary?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22421
Source
Eur J Surg. 1996 Nov;162(11):867-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
E. Näslund
R. Fernstad
S. Ekman
I. Schultz
M L Hjalmar
J. Askergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Surg. 1996 Nov;162(11):867-71
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Axilla
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Female
Humans
Lymph Node Excision
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mastectomy
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study how the information gained from axillary dissection in women (75 years old or more) with breast cancer influenced postoperative adjuvant treatment. DESIGN: Retrospective review of casenotes. SETTING: University departments of surgery and oncology, Sweden. SUBJECTS: 166 women (aged 75 years or more) operated on for primary breast cancer between 1980-1989. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Type of operation and postoperative therapy given. RESULTS: In 138/166 (83%) women axillary dissection was done, but in only 21/59 (36%) of these patients did information gained from the procedure influence the postoperative treatment according to the treatment guidelines for breast cancer. None of the 28 patients who did not undergo axillary dissection were subjected to further operations or radiotherapy for axillary nodal recurrence after a mean follow up of 47 months. CONCLUSIONS: Axillary dissection should be reserved for local control of disease and for those patients who preoperatively agree to undergo postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy if metastases are found.
PubMed ID
8956955 View in PubMed
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Changes in eating behaviour and food choices in families where the mother undergoes gastric bypass surgery for obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276824
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jan;70(1):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Willmer
D. Berglind
P. Tynelius
A. Ghaderi
E. Näslund
F. Rasmussen
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jan;70(1):35-40
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent - surgery
Adult - surgery
Attitude to Health - surgery
Body Mass Index - surgery
Carbonated Beverages - surgery
Child - surgery
Diet - surgery
Eating - surgery
Family - surgery
Female - surgery
Food Habits - surgery
Food Preferences - surgery
Gastric Bypass - surgery
Humans - surgery
Male - surgery
Middle Aged - surgery
Mothers - surgery
Obesity - surgery
Spouses - surgery
Surveys and Questionnaires - surgery
Sweden - surgery
Weight Loss - surgery
Abstract
There is a lack of research exploring the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery on the patient's family's eating behaviour and food choices. The aim of the current study was to investigate changes in partners' and children's eating behaviour and food choices following maternal RYGB.
Sixty-nine women and their families were recruited from RYGB waiting lists at five Swedish surgical clinics. Data were collected during home visits 3 months before and 9 months after RYGB. Anthropometrical measures were taken, the adults completed the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire and the children completed the Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT). All participants also completed a short food frequency questionnaire.
Changes in scores were analysed using paired t-tests for unadjusted estimates or linear regression models with robust variance (General Estimating Equations) in order to enable age- and sex-adjusted estimates for the children. There were no meaningful differences in the partners' eating behaviour or food choices. The boys, but not the girls, improved their ChEAT scores, as did the overweight/obese children in comparison with the normal-weight children. The boys, unlike the girls, also decreased their intake of soft drinks, as did the normal-weight children when compared with the overweight/obese children.
No clear-cut changes were found in partners' eating behaviour and food choices. Eating attitudes and soft drinks intake were improved among boys but not among girls. Differing modelling behaviour may partially explain these findings, but available data did not allow us to understand the underlying mechanisms.
PubMed ID
26330145 View in PubMed
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Cholecystectomy, peptic ulcer disease and the risk of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20308
Source
Br J Surg. 2000 Aug;87(8):1087-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Freedman
J. Lagergren
R. Bergström
E. Näslund
O. Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Danderyd Hospital and Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Surg. 2000 Aug;87(8):1087-93
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - etiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cholecystectomy - adverse effects
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Gastroesophageal Reflux - complications
Humans
Multivariate Analysis
Peptic Ulcer - complications
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Gastro-oesophageal reflux is a strong risk factor for oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Bile and pancreatic enzymes may be particularly carcinogenic. Cholecystectomy causes an increased gastric level of these constituents. A decreased risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has been observed in persons infected with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori. There is a strong correlation between ulcer disease and Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to determine whether previous cholecystectomy or peptic ulcer disease affects the risk of oesophageal carcinoma. METHODS: Data were collected as a nationwide population-based case-control study in Sweden between 1995 and 1997. Multivariate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with logistic regression. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant association between cholecystectomy and the risk of oesophageal carcinoma. Among persons with previous peptic ulcer, the adjusted OR for oesophageal adenocarcinoma was below unity (OR = 0.6, 95 per cent confidence interval 0.3-1.1). The relative risk estimates for cardia adenocarcinoma and oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma were close to unity. CONCLUSION: Cholecystectomy, despite its effect on the composition of gastric juice, does not appear to increase the risk of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus or gastric cardia. While the data do not contradict a protective effect of H. pylori, the results are also consistent with absence of such an effect.
PubMed ID
10931056 View in PubMed
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Differences in gestational weight gain between pregnancies before and after maternal bariatric surgery correlate with differences in birth weight but not with scores on the body mass index in early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264961
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2014 Dec;9(6):427-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
D. Berglind
M. Willmer
E. Näslund
P. Tynelius
T I A Sørensen
F. Rasmussen
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2014 Dec;9(6):427-34
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - statistics & numerical data
Birth weight
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - surgery
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Siblings
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
Large maternal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with increased birth weight and increased risk of obesity in offspring, but these associations may be confounded by genetic and environmental factors. The aim was to investigate the effects of differences in GWG in all three trimesters on differences in birth weight and in body mass index (BMI) scores at 4 and 6 years of age, within siblings born before and after bariatric surgery.
Women with at least one child born before and one after bariatric surgery were identified in national Swedish registers. Series of weight (and height) measurements were collected from antenatal medical records, with data on the nearest pregnancies before and after bariatric surgery.
The age-adjusted means of pre- and post-operative GWG of 124 women were 11.3 (standard deviation [SD] 7.2) and 8.3 (SD 6.4)?kg, respectively (P?=?0.01). Adjusted fixed effects regression models showed positive associations of differences in mean total GWG with differences in siblings' birth weight, 0.023?kg per 1-kg greater weight gain (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.014-0.069) and for second trimester 0.53?kg for each 1-kg greater weight per week (95% CI: 0.32-1.61), whereas no associations were found with BMI in pre-school age.
This study showed positive associations between differences in total and second trimester maternal GWG and differences in children's birth weight, but no association with BMI scores in pre-school age. Maternal genetic, social and lifestyle factors fixed from one pregnancy to the next were taken into account in the analyses by the study design.
PubMed ID
24339139 View in PubMed
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Formation of the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry, SOReg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273040
Source
Obes Surg. 2015 Oct;25(10):1893-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
J L Hedenbro
E. Näslund
L. Boman
G. Lundegårdh
A. Bylund
M. Ekelund
A. Laurenius
P. Möller
T. Olbers
M. Sundbom
J. Ottosson
I. Näslund
Source
Obes Surg. 2015 Oct;25(10):1893-900
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internet
Male
Obesity, Morbid - epidemiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Quality of Life
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Obesity surgery is expanding, the quality of care is ever more important, and learning curve assessment should be established. A large registry cohort can show long-term effects on obesity and its comorbidities, complications, and long-term side effects of surgery, as well as changes in health-related quality of life (QoL). Sweden is ideally suited to the task of data collection and audit, with universal use of personal identification numbers, nation-wide registries permitting cross-matching to analyze causes of death, in-hospital care, and health-related absenteeism.
In 2004, the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg) was initiated and government financing secured. A project group created a national database covering all public as well as private hospitals. Data entry was to be made online, operative definitions of comorbidity were formed, and complication severity scored. Several forms of audit were devised.
After pilot studies, the system has been running in its present form since 2007. Since 15 January 2013, SOReg covers all bariatric surgery centers in Sweden. The number of operations in the database exceeded 40,000 (March 2014), with a median follow-up of 2.94 years. Audit shows that >98% of data are correct. All results are publicized annually on the Internet.
Using this systematic approach, it has been possible to cover >99% of all bariatric surgery, cross-matching our data with nation-wide registries for in-hospital care, cause of death, and permitting regular nation-wide audit. Several scientific studies have used, or are using, what seems to be the most comprehensive database in obesity surgery.
PubMed ID
25703826 View in PubMed
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[International meeting on hernia surgery: mesh facilitates healing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224114
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Mar 25;89(13):1052
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Mar-25-1992
Author
O. Jansson
E. Näslund
Author Affiliation
Medicinska kliniken, Karlskoga lasarett.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Mar 25;89(13):1052
Date
Mar-25-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Hernia, Inguinal - surgery
Herniorrhaphy
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Orchitis - etiology
Postoperative Complications
Surgical Mesh
Sweden
Wound Healing - physiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1992 Jun 10;89(24):2175-61385847
PubMed ID
1348098 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.