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A 3-year follow-up after anterior colporrhaphy compared with collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272920
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
M. Rudnicki
E. Laurikainen
R. Pogosean
I. Kinne
U. Jakobsson
P. Teleman
Source
BJOG. 2016 Jan;123(1):136-42
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Collagen
Denmark - epidemiology
Dyspareunia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures - instrumentation - methods
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - epidemiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Surgical Mesh
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To compare the 1-year (previously published) and 3-year objective and subjective cure rates, and complications, related to the use of a collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse against a conventional anterior repair.
Randomised controlled study.
Six departments of obstetrics and gynaecology in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark.
A total of 138 women, of 55 years of age or older, admitted for stage =2 anterior vaginal wall prolapse.
The women scheduled for primary anterior vaginal wall prolapse surgery were randomised between conventional anterior colporrhaphy and surgery with a collagen-coated prolene mesh. All patients were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) assessment before and after surgery. Symptoms related to pelvic organ prolapse were evaluated using the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7) and the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20).
Objective cure, defined as POP-Q stage
PubMed ID
26420345 View in PubMed
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Anterior colporrhaphy compared with collagen-coated transvaginal mesh for anterior vaginal wall prolapse: a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106735
Source
BJOG. 2014 Jan;121(1):102-10; discussion 110-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
M. Rudnicki
E. Laurikainen
R. Pogosean
I. Kinne
U. Jakobsson
P. Teleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Roskilde University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.
Source
BJOG. 2014 Jan;121(1):102-10; discussion 110-1
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Collagen
Cystocele - surgery
Denmark
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sexuality
Surgical Mesh
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Vagina - surgery
Abstract
To investigate the anatomical cure rate and complications related to collagen-coated mesh for cystocele, compared with a conventional anterior colporrhaphy.
A randomised controlled study.
Six departments of obstetrics and gynaecology in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark.
Women aged 55 years or older, referred for surgery with a prolapse of the anterior vaginal wall of stage 2 or higher.
Women scheduled for primary cystocoele surgery were randomised to either anterior colporrhaphy or a collagen-coated Prolene mesh. Power analysis indicated that 130 patients had to be randomised. All patients were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Quantification (POP-Q) measurement. Quality of life, symptoms, and sexual function were evaluated using the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire.
The primary outcome was objective cure, defined as prolapse below POP-Q stage 2 at the 12-months follow-up. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, symptoms, and presence (or not) of complications.
In total, 161 women were randomised to either anterior colporrhaphy or mesh (participant ages 64.9 ± 6.4 years versus 64.7 ± 6.6 years, respectively; mean ± SD). The objective cure rate was 39.8% (95% CI 28.6-50.9%) in the anterior colporrhaphy group, compared with 88.1% (95% CI 80.7-95.6%) in the mesh group (P
PubMed ID
24118844 View in PubMed
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[Etiology, treatment and prognosis of peripheral facial palsy in the light of Borrelia and viral antibody findings].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103999
Source
Duodecim. 1990;106(21):1437-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

A nationwide analysis of transvaginal tape release for urinary retention after tension-free vaginal tape procedure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173112
Source
Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2006 Feb;17(2):111-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
E. Laurikainen
P. Kiilholma
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Turku University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 52, Fin-20521, Turku, Finland. eija.laurikainen@tyks.fi
Source
Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2006 Feb;17(2):111-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Prostheses and Implants - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Surgical Mesh - adverse effects
Urinary Incontinence, Stress - surgery
Urinary Retention - etiology - surgery
Urologic Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Abstract
The role of transvaginal release procedure (TRP) for the treatment of urinary retention after TVT operation in Finland by the end of the year 2002 was evaluated. Questionnaires regarding the TVTs and the TRPs were sent to 56 hospitals. A retrospective review of the records of 48 women undergoing the TRP was available for analysis. TVT was performed on 9040 patients under local (94%), spinal (4%) or general (2%) anesthesia. TRP was made under local (48%), light (48%) or spinal (4%) anesthesia. The number of TRPs was 50/9040 (0.6%) in the whole country. Forty-nine percent of the patients were completely cured of their retention and remained continent after TRP by subjective report and by stress test. The retention following a TVT did not resolve in four patients (12%) who underwent TRP. This nationwide analysis proved that half of the patients remained continent after TRP, which is in our opinion an important information for all proceduralists.
PubMed ID
16132161 View in PubMed
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Peripheral facial palsy caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and viruses in south-western Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225083
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1992;492:103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
H J Puhakka
E. Laurikainen
M. Viljanen
O. Meurman
H. Valkama
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1992;492:103-6
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Borrelia burgdorferi Group
Facial Paralysis - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lyme Disease - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - etiology
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Virus Diseases - complications
Abstract
In a prospective study from 1983 through 1984, 77 patients (31 men and 46 women with a mean age of 47 +/- 20 years) with peripheral facial palsy of primarily unknown etiology were investigated. Only 2 patients with acute otitis media received antibiotics. Serology of the patients was investigated on days 1 and 14. IgG and IgM antibodies against herpes simplex, varicella-zoster and cytomegalovirus were determined by enzyme immunoassay, and against Epstein-Barr virus by immunofluorescence. In a retrospective analysis, IgM, IgA and IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Borreliosis was diagnosed in 5 patients and varicella-zoster infection in 7. There was no statistically significant difference in recovery time between the different groups. Follow-up time for the patients with borreliosis was over 5 years. Neither meningeal symptoms nor polyneuropathy was observed in the patients with borreliosis even in the absence of antibiotic therapy.
PubMed ID
1321549 View in PubMed
Less detail