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Environmental health collaboration: United States and Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183668
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):333-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
C H Rubin
R L Jones
B. Revich
S L Avaliani
E. Gurvich
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Health Studies Branch, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. CRubin@cdc.gov
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):333-8
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental health
Environmental Pollutants - poisoning
Humans
Infant
International Cooperation
Lead Poisoning - blood
Medical Laboratory Science - instrumentation - methods
Pesticides - poisoning
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia
United States
Abstract
Developed nations share similar challenges to human health from commercial and agricultural chemicals that are released into the environment. Although Russia and the United States are historically distinct and unique, both countries are geographically large and economically dependent on emission-producing surface transportation. This paper describes U.S.-Russian collaborative activities that grew from a 1995 conference in Moscow that brought together environmental health investigators from both countries to discuss common concerns about the human health impact of environmental pollutants. Lead, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, and mercury were identified as contaminants of greatest concern. Collaborative studies were initiated that included collecting blood and hair samples and splitting samples for analyses in both countries, and introducing and sharing new portable blood and environmental sample analyses instruments. The findings demonstrated that hair analysis was not a good predictor of BLL and that Russian children in the first city sampled had a mean BLL of 7.7 microg/dl. Although higher than the U.S. mean, this level was below the 10.0 microg/dl CDC level of concern. This manuscript summarizes additional study results and describes their impacts on Russian policy. On-going collaborative environmental investigations are described.
PubMed ID
12971688 View in PubMed
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