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Alteration of infant attention and activity by polychlorinated biphenyls: Unravelling critical windows of susceptibility using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96433
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2010 Jun 4;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-4-2010
Author
M-A Verner
P. Plusquellec
G. Muckle
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
S W Jacobson
J L Jacobson
M. Charbonneau
S. Haddad
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences biologiques, TOXEN, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2010 Jun 4;
Date
Jun-4-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Pre- and postnatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can impair behavioural function in animal models at doses within the range at which humans are commonly exposed. Yet, epidemiologic studies conducted in the US and Europe are inconsistent with regard to the developmental effects of lactational exposure to these chemicals. This inconsistency may be due to limitations in the current methodological approaches for assessing postnatal exposure to PCBs. Our study used a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to simulate blood PCB levels during specific pre- and postnatal periods and to evaluate the relation of those levels to infant behaviour. A previously validated PBPK model was used to simulate infant blood PCB-153 levels at delivery and on a month-by-month basis during the first year of life for Inuit infants enrolled in a longitudinal birth cohort. Infant behaviour was assessed using the Behaviour Rating Scales (BRS) of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-II) at 11 months of age and video coding of inattention and activity measured during the administration of the mental development subscale of the BSID-II. The estimated pre- and postnatal PCB exposure measures predicted significant increases in inattention and activity at 11 months. Whereas inattention was related to prenatal exposure, activity level, measured by non-elicited activity, was best predicted by postnatal exposure, with the strongest association obtained for simulated PCB levels during the 4th month of life. These findings are consistent with previous reports indicating PCB-induced behavioural alteration in attention and activity level. Simulated infant toxicokinetic profiles for the first year of life revealed windows of susceptibility during which PCBs may impair infant attention and activity.
PubMed ID
20609431 View in PubMed
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Analysis of hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds in whole blood from Canadian inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6761
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
C D Sandau
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
J. Duffe
R J Norstrom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Hydroxylation
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In this study, we identified the main hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds and we determined their relative concentrations in whole blood from 13 male and 17 female Inuit from northern Quebec, Canada, and from a pooled whole blood sample from southern Quebec. We also determined concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Total OH-PCB concentrations were variable among the Inuit samples, ranging over 2 orders of magnitude (0.117-11.6 ng/g whole blood wet weight). These concentrations were equal to and up to 70 times those found for the southern Quebec pooled whole blood sample. Geometric mean concentrations of total OH-PCBs were 1.73 and 1.01 ng/g whole blood for Inuit men and women, respectively, and 0.161 ng/g whole blood for the southern population pool. There are limited data available for comparison, but the levels of OH-PCBs in Inuit are higher than those previously reported in the literature for other populations. There was a significant correlation (p
PubMed ID
10903613 View in PubMed
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Anemia and iron status in Inuit infants from northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4828
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;91(6):407-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
N D Willows
E. Dewailly
K. Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 Nov-Dec;91(6):407-10
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Bottle Feeding
Breast Feeding
Cohort Studies
Diet
Erythrocyte Count
Ferritin - blood - deficiency
Hemoglobins - deficiency
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The iron status and diet of Inuit infants living in northern Quebec who were part of a prospective cohort study was described. The prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin values > 2 SD below the reference mean) was 21.1% (23/109), 47.4% (55/116) and 37.7% (46/122) at 2, 6 and 12 months, respectively. The corresponding prevalence of microcytic anemia was 0.0%, 4.3% and 21.3%. At 2, 6 and 12 months, iron-deficiency anemia (serum ferritin
PubMed ID
11200728 View in PubMed
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Association of red blood cell n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids with plasma inflammatory biomarkers among the Quebec Cree population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262751
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;68(9):1042-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
M-È Labonté
E. Dewailly
M. Lucas
P. Couture
B. Lamarche
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Sep;68(9):1042-7
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - blood
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - blood
Abstract
We examined the prevalence of elevated plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations and associations with red blood cell (RBC) long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA) in the James Bay Cree population from the province of Quebec (Canada).
A total of 744 Cree adults (18-91 years) from seven communities of Eastern James Bay were included in these cross-sectional analyses. Associations between RBC LCn-3PUFA and proinflammatory markers (hs-CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a)) were assessed by using multivariate general linear models with adjustment for sex, age and waist circumference. An arbitrary inflammation score was defined based on the sum of the quartiles of hs-CRP, IL-6 and TNF-a concentrations (range=3-12).
Elevated hs-CRP concentrations (>3?mg/l) were present in 46.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 43.3-50.5) of the James Bay Cree population. RBC docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-3; C22:5n-3) was inversely associated with hs-CRP, TNF-a and the inflammation score (all P trend0.18). Among participants with RBC DPAn-3 levels above the median of the population, odds ratio of having an elevated inflammation score (=9) was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.48-0.93) compared with participants below the median.
RESULTS indicate that low-grade systemic inflammation is highly prevalent and that higher RBC DPAn-3 levels are associated with a lower risk of systemic inflammation in the James Bay Cree population.
PubMed ID
25028086 View in PubMed
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Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229175
Source
Am J Public Health. 1990 May;80(5):594-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
B. Lévesque
E. Dewailly
R. Lavoie
D. Prud'Homme
S. Allaire
Author Affiliation
Département de santé communautaire, Centre hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1990 May;80(5):594-8
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Adult
Age Factors
Air Pollutants - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis - metabolism
Carboxyhemoglobin - analysis
Hockey
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Smoking
Abstract
We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted that for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.
Notes
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1971 Dec;32(12):790-8015149395
Cites: Clin Chem. 1990 Jan;36(1):1602297914
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1973 Jul;79(1):46-504578639
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Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1973 Dec;27(6):349-544752694
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1975 Oct;65(10):1087-901163706
Cites: J Appl Physiol. 1976 Feb;40(2):159-631248994
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1976 May;113(5):587-6001267262
Cites: J Air Pollut Control Assoc. 1978 Aug;28(8):776-9690339
Cites: Am Heart J. 1981 Feb;101(2):154-77468415
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1983 Jul-Aug;74(4):261-56627181
Cites: J Am Coll Health. 1986 Feb;34(4):185-63700879
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1988 Mar-Apr;79(2):124-93383058
Cites: Va Med. 1989 Feb;116(2):74-62929167
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1972 Nov;77(5):669-764117097
PubMed ID
2327538 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the microbiological quality of water coolers and that of municipal water systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218521
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1994 Apr;60(4):1174-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Simard
D. Gauvin
S. Gingras
E. Dewailly
R. Letarte
Author Affiliation
Service Santé et Environnement, Centre de Santé Publique de Québec, Ste. Foy, Canada.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1994 Apr;60(4):1174-8
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking
Equipment Contamination
Household Articles
Humans
Hygiene
Mineral Waters - analysis
Quebec
Sanitary Engineering
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
The microbiological quality of tap water and that of water from 50 water coolers located in residences and workplaces were comparatively studied. In addition, difference factors that might influence the bacteriological contamination of water dispensers were examined. Aeorbic and facultative anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria, total coliforms, and two indicators for fecal contamination (fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci) as well as three types of pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Aeromonas spp.) were enumerated. It was found that 36 and 28% of the water dispenser samples from the residences and the workplaces, respectively, were contaminated by a least one coliform or indicator bacterium and/or at least one pathogenic bacterium. The respective proportions of tap water samples contaminated in a similar fashion were 18 and 22%, much less than those observed for water coolers (Chi2(1) = 3.71, P = 0.05). We were unable to discern the dominant factors responsible for the contamination of water coolers, but cleaning the water dispenser every 2 months seemed to limit the extent of contamination.
Notes
Cites: Ann Ist Super Sanita. 1976;12(2-3):93-112829205
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1980 Apr;39(4):739-427377774
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1981 Aug;42(2):277-837283426
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 1987 Oct;99(2):439-433678404
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1992 Jun;58(6):1940-41622269
Cites: J R Soc Health. 1989 Aug;109(4):118-242511309
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 May 15;144(10):1273-52025823
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 1991 Apr;57(4):945-82059052
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1992 Jan;38(1):12-91581861
Cites: Can J Microbiol. 1987 Dec;33(12):1120-53446349
PubMed ID
8017912 View in PubMed
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Cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 enzyme activity and DNA adducts in placenta of women environmentally exposed to organochlorines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3494
Source
Environ Res. 1999 May;80(4):369-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
J. Lagueux
D. Pereg
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
G G Poirier
Author Affiliation
Health and Environment Unit, CHUQ, CHUL Research Center and Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Ste-Foy, Québec, G1V 4G2, Canada.
Source
Environ Res. 1999 May;80(4):369-82
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - analysis
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - metabolism
DNA - genetics - metabolism
DNA Adducts - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Enzyme Induction - drug effects
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - adverse effects - blood
Inuits
Placenta - drug effects - metabolism
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis
Pregnancy - blood
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
Organochlorine compounds bioaccumulate in fishing and hunting products included in the daily diet of many coastal populations. Prenatal and perinatal exposure to large doses of PCBs and PCDFs was shown to be deleterious on fetal and neonatal development, but information is scarce regarding possible effects of chronic low-dose exposure. This study investigates biomarkers of early effects in newborns from women exposed to organochlorines through the consumption of species from marine food chains, in two remote coastal regions of the province of Quebec (Canada). A CYP1A1-dependent enzyme activity (EROD) and DNA adducts were measured in placenta samples obtained from 30 women living on the Lower-North-Shore of the St. Lawrence River and 22 Inuit women from Nunavik (Arctic Quebec). These biomarkers were also assessed in 30 women from a Quebec urban center (Sept-Iles) as a reference group. Prenatal organochlorine exposure was determined by measuring these compounds in umbilical cord plasma. The amount of bulky polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-related DNA adducts was significantly greater in the Lower-North-Shore group than in the reference group. Placental EROD activity and the amount of less bulky (OC-related) DNA adducts were significantly higher in the Nunavik group than in the reference group. For both biomarkers, smoking was found to be an important confounding factor. Organochlorine exposure was significantly associated with EROD activity and DNA adduct levels when stratifying for smoking. This study confirms that CYP1A1 enzyme induction and DNA adducts in placental tissue constitute useful biomarkers of early effects induced by environmental exposure to organochlorines.
PubMed ID
10330311 View in PubMed
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Dietary sodium intake deleteriously affects blood pressure in a normotensive population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126993
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Apr;66(4):533-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
M L Chateau-Degat
A. Ferland
S. Déry
E. Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe Santé des Populations et Environnementale, Centre de Recherche du CHUL, Québec, QC, Canada. marie-ludivine.chateau-degat@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012 Apr;66(4):533-5
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Blood Pressure Determination
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology
Inuits
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Western dietary pattern, and particularly high dietary sodium intake (DSI), is recognized for its detrimental impact on blood pressure (BP). This paper examined the association of DSI with BP in Nunavik Inuit (Québec), a population known to have an optimal BP on average. In a population-based study, we recruited 421 normotensive participants aged 18-74 years from 14 coastal villages, situated north of the 55th parallel. BP, biochemistry and anthropometry were obtained. DSI was assessed by a 24-h dietary recall. Mean (s.e.) DSI was higher in men than in women (2358 (101) vs. 1702 (100) mg/d, P
PubMed ID
22333870 View in PubMed
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Dioxin-like compounds in fishing people from the Lower North Shore of the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208106
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1997 Jul-Aug;52(4):309-16
Publication Type
Article
Author
J J Ryan
E. Dewailly
A. Gilman
C. Laliberté
P. Ayotte
J. Rodrigue
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Protection Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1997 Jul-Aug;52(4):309-16
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Birds
Dioxins - blood
Eggs - analysis
Female
Fisheries - statistics & numerical data
Food contamination - analysis
Fresh Water
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Rural Population
Seafood - analysis
Abstract
In this study, investigators assessed exposure to dioxin-like compounds in a fishing population that inhabits small coastal communities along the Lower North Shore of the St. Lawrence River, Quebec. This population relies heavily on wildlife foods for sustenance. Investigators analyzed chemically the most popular marine foods (i.e., fish, crustaceans, sea mammals, and sea-bird eggs), and they also obtained 25 human plasma samples from individuals in two villages along the river. The mean level of total polychlorinated biphenyls in this population was approximately twice that found in the entire fishing cohort. Plasma levels of dioxin-like compounds, expressed as tetrachlorodibenzodioxin toxic equivalents, were approximately eight times higher than levels in urban residents. Most of the increase in tetrachlorodibenzodioxin toxic equivalents in the selected fish eaters resulted primarily from an elevation in polychlorinated biphenyls. Concentrations of dioxin-like compounds from the Lower North Shore were low in fish and seals, but concentrations were elevated in the eggs of sea birds. Given that there was also a significant statistical correlation in the entire population between human plasma levels and consumption of birds' eggs-and not other traditional foods-much of the increased human dose appeared to originate from this one food source. Because there appear to be increased, but uncertain, health risks from this elevated body burden, investigators advised the residents of the area to avoid consumption of wild birds' eggs (i.e., a food source of minor nutritional importance).
PubMed ID
9210733 View in PubMed
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Environmental contaminants and human health in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99174
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Aug 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2010
Author
S G Donaldson
J. Van Oostdam
C. Tikhonov
M. Feeley
B. Armstrong
P. Ayotte
O. Boucher
W. Bowers
L. Chan
F. Dallaire
R. Dallaire
E. Dewailly
J. Edwards
G M Egeland
J. Fontaine
C. Furgal
T. Leech
E. Loring
G. Muckle
T. Nancarrow
D. Pereg
P. Plusquellec
M. Potyrala
O. Receveur
R G Shearer
Author Affiliation
Chemicals Surveillance Bureau, HECSB, Health Canada, 269 Laurier Ave West, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0K9; Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S 5B6.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2010 Aug 20;
Date
Aug-20-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The third Canadian Arctic Human Health Assessment conducted under the Canadian Northern Contaminants Program (NCP), in association with the circumpolar Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), addresses concerns about possible adverse health effects in individuals exposed to environmental contaminants through a diet containing country foods. The objectives here are to: 1) provide data on changes in human contaminant concentrations and exposure among Canadian Arctic peoples; 2) identify new contaminants of concern; 3) discuss possible health effects; 4) outline risk communication about contaminants in country food; and 5) identify knowledge gaps for future contaminant research and monitoring. The nutritional and cultural benefits of country foods are substantial; however, some dietary studies suggest declines in the amount of country foods being consumed. Significant declines were found for most contaminants in maternal blood over the last 10years within all three Arctic regions studied. Inuit continue to have the highest levels of almost all persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals among the ethnic groups studied. A greater proportion of people in the East exceed Health Canada's guidelines for PCBs and mercury, although the proportion of mothers exceeding these guidelines has decreased since the previous assessment. Further monitoring and research are required to assess trends and health effects of emerging contaminants. Infant development studies have shown possible subtle effects of prenatal exposure to heavy metals and some POPs on immune system function and neurodevelopment. New data suggest important beneficial effects on brain development for Inuit infants from some country food nutrients. The most successful risk communication processes balance the risks and benefits of a diet of country food through input from a variety of regional experts and the community, to incorporate the many socio-cultural and economic factors to arrive at a risk management decision that will be the most beneficial in Arctic communities.
PubMed ID
20728918 View in PubMed
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43 records – page 1 of 5.