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Convenience food use in eight hospitals in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245159
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1981 Jan;42(1):39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1981
Author
E M Upton
P D Glencross
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1981 Jan;42(1):39-46
Date
Jan-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Efficiency
Food Preservation
Food Service, Hospital - economics
Frozen Foods
Humans
Ontario
Abstract
A ten point Conventional Convenience Rating Scale (CCRS) was developed to classify and analyze differences in use of convenience food for menu items of selective regular and diabetic diets for seven days in eight active treatment hospitals. Statistical analysis showed that the CCRS score detected differences between six meal components, three meals and four areas of production within each diet type. The convenience hospital had generally highest CCRS scores for all meal components; dessert CCRS scores were primarily dependent on the presence or absence of a bakeshop on the premises. Breakfast had the highest mean meal CCRS scores and lunch the lowest. CCRS scores were lowest for menu items which were prepared in the chef's area and in the salad and sandwich area. There was a significant inverse relationship (r = 0.895) between mean hospital CCRS score and aggregate skill level of food production employees. No correlation was found between the mean hospital CCRS score and 1) meal-days per food production labour minute, 2) total food cost per meal-day and 3) food production labour cost per meal-day. Among other recommendations, this research suggests that further investigation be made to assess the adequacy of the standards of performance used in this study and commonly used as indicators of institutional foodservice efficiency.
PubMed ID
10309348 View in PubMed
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Managers' perceptions of customers' satisfactions with their hospital cafeteria services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224533
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1991;52(1):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
C M Johnston
E M Upton
Author Affiliation
College of Family and Consumer Studies, University of Guelph, Ontario.
Source
J Can Diet Assoc. 1991;52(1):11-4
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Hospital Administrators
Humans
Models, Statistical
Ontario
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Restaurants - standards
Abstract
It is important that hospital cafeterias deliver products that create customer satisfaction so that financial objectives are met. An exploratory descriptive survey of 12 selected hospital cafeterias used a self-administered questionnaire to determine how satisfied customers were with services provided. It also asked cafeteria managers to give their perceptions of their customers' relative satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the service. Principal components analysis, followed by varimax rotation, identified four underlying constructs of the 15 pre-selected foodservice characteristics used to measure relative satisfaction. A multiple regression model, controlling for country, hospital size and customer demographics, in which the dependent variable was overall rating, found that the independent variables, the underlying rating constructs--food and service--made a much greater impact on overall rating than environment and accessibility. Most cafeteria managers' predictions about their customers' satisfaction were within two standard deviations of their customers' mean scores of satisfaction. While the managers' close association with their service may have accounted for this, it does not necessarily follow that they have the power to implement policy and product improvements.
PubMed ID
10111595 View in PubMed
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