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The association of pre-pregnancy alcohol drinking with child neuropsychological functioning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270870
Source
BJOG. 2015 Dec;122(13):1728-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
U S Kesmodel
M I S Kjaersgaard
C H Denny
J. Bertrand
Å. Skogerbø
H-L F Eriksen
B. Bay
M. Underbjerg
E L Mortensen
Source
BJOG. 2015 Dec;122(13):1728-38
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Attention
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Psychological Tests
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the effects of pre-pregnancy alcohol drinking on child neuropsychological functioning.
Prospective follow-up study.
154 women and their children sampled from the Danish National Birth Cohort.
Participants were sampled based on maternal alcohol consumption before pregnancy. At 5 years of age, the children were tested with the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised, the Test of Everyday Attention for Children at Five (TEACh-5), and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC). The Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) was completed by the mothers and a preschool teacher. Parental education, maternal IQ, prenatal maternal smoking, child's age at testing, child's sex, and maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy were considered potential confounders.
Performance on the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised, the TEACh-5, the MABC, and the BRIEF.
Intake of 15-21 drinks/week on average prior to pregnancy was not associated with any of the outcomes, but intake of =22 drinks/week on average was associated with a significantly lower adjusted mean full scale IQ and lower adjusted means in overall attention and sustained attention score, but not in selective attention score or any of the BRIEF index scores or MABC scores.
Intake of =22 drinks/week before pregnancy was associated with lower mean full scale IQ, overall attention and sustained attention. Assessment of pre-pregnancy drinking provides additional information regarding potential prenatal alcohol exposure and its implications for child neurodevelopment.
Notes
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Comment In: BJOG. 2015 Dec;122(13):173925471170
PubMed ID
25395365 View in PubMed
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Beer, wine, spirits and subjective health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10529
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Nov;53(11):721-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
M. Grønbaek
E L Mortensen
K. Mygind
A T Andersen
U. Becker
C. Gluud
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 Nov;53(11):721-4
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - trends
Alcoholic Beverages
Beer
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Wine
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and self reported subjective health. DESIGN: Cross sectional health survey with assessment of intake of beer, wine and spirits (at last non-weekend day), smoking habits, social networks, physical activity, body mass index, educational level, presence of chronic disease, and self reported health. SETTING: WHO Copenhagen Healthy City Survey, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 4113 men and 7926 women aged 18 to 100 years. MAIN RESULTS: Of the 12,039 subjects, 8680 reported their health as optimal, and 3359 reported a suboptimal health. After controlling for the covariates, the relation between total alcohol intake and the proportion reporting suboptimal health was J shaped. Heavy drinkers of any of the three types of alcoholic beverages had a higher prevalence of suboptimal health than non-drinkers. However, only light (1-2 glasses of wine yesterday) and moderate (3-5) wine drinkers had significantly lower odds ratios for suboptimal health--0.72 (95% confidence limits; 0.56 to 0.92) and 0.65 (0.49 to 0.87), respectively--when compared with non-wine drinkers. Moderate beer or spirits drinkers did not differ significantly from non-drinkers of these beverages with regard to prevalence of suboptimal health. Consistently, beer preference drinkers had an odds ratio of 1.50 (1.25 to 1.80) for suboptimal health compared with wine preference drinkers. CONCLUSIONS: A light to moderate wine intake is related to good self perceived health, whereas this is not the case for beer and spirits. The causal relations creating this association are unknown and should be considered when interpreting the relation between different types of alcoholic beverages and subsequent morbidity and mortality.
PubMed ID
10656102 View in PubMed
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Better psychological functioning and higher social status may largely explain the apparent health benefits of wine: a study of wine and beer drinking in young Danish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10157
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2001 Aug 13-27;161(15):1844-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E L Mortensen
H H Jensen
S A Sanders
J M Reinisch
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Center, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Kommunehospitalet, DK-1399 Copenhagen K, Denmark. lykke@ipm.hosp.dk
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2001 Aug 13-27;161(15):1844-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Cognition
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Intelligence
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Personality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Socioeconomic Factors
Wine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Findings from a recent series of Danish studies suggest that moderate wine drinkers are healthier than those who drink other alcoholic beverages or those who abstain. OBJECTIVE: To identify possible explanatory factors associated with the health benefits of wine consumption through the examination of a wide spectrum of social, cognitive, and personality characteristics related to both beverage choice and health in young Danish adults. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Descriptive cross-sectional study of characteristics associated with beverage choice in a sample of 363 men and 330 women between the ages of 29 and 34 years, selected from the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort on the basis of perinatal records. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Socioeconomic status, education, IQ, personality, psychiatric symptoms, and health-related behaviors, including alcohol consumption, were analyzed. The outcome variables were subjected to linear and logistic regression analyses with 2 factors (beer and wine), each with 2 levels (drinking or not drinking a certain beverage type). RESULTS: Wine drinking was significantly associated with higher IQ, higher parental educational level, and higher socioeconomic status. Beer drinking was significantly associated with lower scores on the same variables. On scales concerning personality, psychiatric symptoms, and health-related behaviors, wine drinking was associated with optimal functioning and beer drinking with suboptimal functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that wine drinking is a general indicator of optimal social, cognitive, and personality development in Denmark. Similar social, cognitive, and personality factors have also been associated with better health in many populations. Consequently, the association between drinking habits and social and psychological characteristics, in large part, may explain the apparent health benefits of wine.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Feb 11;162(3):364-511822941
PubMed ID
11493125 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding and risk of schizophrenia in the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51854
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2005 Jul;112(1):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
H J Sørensen
E L Mortensen
J M Reinisch
S A Mednick
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Amager Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2005 Jul;112(1):26-9
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Catchment Area (Health)
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Single Parent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Weaning
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim was to study whether early weaning from breastfeeding may be associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. METHOD: The current sample comprises 6841 individuals from the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort of whom 1671 (24%) had been breastfed for 2 weeks or less (early weaning) and 5170 (76%) had been breastfed longer. Maternal schizophrenia, parental social status, single mother status and gender were included as covariates in a multiple regression analysis of the effect of early weaning on the risk of hospitalization with schizophrenia. RESULTS: The sample comprised 93 cases of schizophrenia (1.4%). Maternal schizophrenia was the strongest risk factor and a significant association between single mother status and elevated offspring risk of schizophrenia was also observed. Early weaning was significantly related to later schizophrenia in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses (adjusted odds ratio 1.73 with 95% CI: 1.13-2.67). CONCLUSION: No or
PubMed ID
15952942 View in PubMed
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Childhood body mass index and risk of schizophrenia in relation to childhood age, sex and age of first contact with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277400
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;34:64-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
H J Sørensen
M. Gamborg
T I A Sørensen
J L Baker
E L Mortensen
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;34:64-9
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Birth weight
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Abstract
Childhood leanness is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, but the effects of gender, age at anthropometric measurements and age at first diagnosis on this relationship are unclear. The present study aimed at elucidating these associations.
Population-based cohort study with childhood anthropometric measures obtained annually from the age of 7 to 13 years in 253,353 Danes born 1930-1976 and followed to 31 December 2010. During this period, 4936 were registered with schizophrenia. The associations of childhood BMI with risk of schizophrenia were estimated with Cox regression models.
Childhood BMI was significantly inversely associated with risk of schizophrenia, however with different patterns among boys and girls. In boys, childhood BMI had an inverse non-linear association with schizophrenia risk dependent on age at diagnosis; in particular, a surprisingly strong association was found between leanness and later onset of schizophrenia. In girls, the risk of schizophrenia decreased linearly with increasing BMI z-score (HR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.88-0.98). In both boys and girls, birth weight was inversely associated with later risk. In girls, but not in boys, birth weight appeared to significantly modify the associations; there was a somewhat stronger inverse association in the lowest birth weight category.
Birth weight as well as childhood BMI at ages 7 through 13 years is associated with risk of schizophrenia in both genders, but with a particular high risk of late-onset in lean boys irrespective of birth weight, and in lean girls with low birth weight. If replicated, these observations may inform preventive efforts build on schizophrenia trajectories rooted in early life.
PubMed ID
26967349 View in PubMed
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The Danish National Birth Cohort--its background, structure and aim.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15422
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Dec;29(4):300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
J. Olsen
M. Melbye
S F Olsen
T I Sørensen
P. Aaby
A M Andersen
D. Taxbøl
K D Hansen
M. Juhl
T B Schow
H T Sørensen
J. Andresen
E L Mortensen
A W Olesen
C. Søndergaard
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2001 Dec;29(4):300-7
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fetal Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Hematologic Tests
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Population Surveillance - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - epidemiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is well known that the time from conception to early childhood has importance for health conditions that reach into later stages of life. Recent research supports this view, and diseases such as cardiovascular morbidity, cancer, mental illnesses, asthma, and allergy may all have component causes that act early in life. Exposures in this period, which influence fetal growth, cell divisions, and organ functioning, may have long-lasting impact on health and disease susceptibility. METHODS: To investigate these issues the Danish National Birth Cohort (Better health for mother and child) was established. A large cohort of pregnant women with long-term follow-up of the offspring was the obvious choice because many of the exposures of interest cannot be reconstructed with sufficient validity back in time. The study needs to be large, and it is aimed to recruit 100,000 women early in pregnancy, and to continue follow-up for decades. The Nordic countries are better suited for this kind of research than most other countries because of their population-based registers on diseases, demography and social conditions, linkable at the individual level by means of the unique ID-number given to all citizens. Exposure information is mainly collected by computer-assisted telephone interviews with the women twice during pregnancy and when their children are six and 18 months old. Participants are also asked to fill in a self-administered food frequency questionnaire in mid-pregnancy. Furthermore, a biological bank has been set up with blood taken from the mother twice during pregnancy and blood from the umbilical cord taken shortly after birth. Data collection started in 1996 and the project covered all regions in Denmark in 1999. By August 2000. a total of 60,000 pregnant women had been recruited to the study. It is expected that a large number of gene-environmental hypotheses need to be based on case-control analyses within a cohort like this.
PubMed ID
11775787 View in PubMed
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Duration of breast-feeding and linear growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61779
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2000;478:183-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K F Michaelsen
E L Mortensen
J M Reinisch
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition and LMC Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2000;478:183-91
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bottle Feeding
Breast Feeding
Denmark
Developed Countries - statistics & numerical data
Growth
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Weight Gain
PubMed ID
11065071 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early identification of non-remission in first-episode psychosis in a two-year outcome study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141450
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Erik Simonsen
S. Friis
S. Opjordsmoen
E L Mortensen
U. Haahr
I. Melle
I. Joa
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Unit, Zealand Region Psychiatry Roskilde, Roskilde University and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. es@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Nov;122(5):375-83
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Remission Induction
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Statistics, nonparametric
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify predictors of non-remission in first-episode, non-affective psychosis.
During 4 years, we recruited 301 patients consecutively. Information about first remission at 3 months was available for 299 and at 2 years for 293 cases. Symptomatic and social outcomes were assessed at 3 months, 1 and 2 years.
One hundred and twenty-nine patients (43%) remained psychotic at 3 months and 48 patients (16.4%) remained psychotic over 2 years. When we compared premorbid and baseline data for the three groups, the non-remitted (n = 48), remitted for
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):49421219270
PubMed ID
20722632 View in PubMed
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Early nasal continuous positive airway pressure in a cohort of the smallest infants in Denmark: neurodevelopmental outcome at five years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30426
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):190-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Bo M Hansen
B. Hoff
G. Greisen
E L Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology, JMC Section 5021, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. moelholm@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):190-5
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anthropometry
Brain - abnormalities
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - physiopathology
Disability Evaluation
Echoencephalography
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Observation
Positive-Pressure Respiration - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration, Artificial
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
AIM: To evaluate neurodevelopmental outcome at age 5 y of age in a cohort of preterm children treated mainly with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the neonatal period. METHODS: A national prospective observational study was conducted in Denmark which included all 269 surviving children with a birthweight below 1000 g or a gestational age below 28 wk born in Denmark in between 1994 and 1995. A total of 164 children (61%) had been treated with nasal CPAP only in the neonatal period. A reference group (n = 76) of term children was studied in parallel. RESULTS: Of the 269 surviving children, 252 (94%) were examined. Twenty-four children (10%) had cerebral palsy, and three children were blind. No case of hearing impairment was detected. Nineteen percent of the index children had an IQ score
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):14815046260
PubMed ID
15046272 View in PubMed
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The effect of alcohol binge drinking in early pregnancy on general intelligence in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123278
Source
BJOG. 2012 Sep;119(10):1222-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
U S Kesmodel
H-L Falgreen Eriksen
M. Underbjerg
T R Kilburn
H. Støvring
T. Wimberley
E L Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Section of Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Denmark. ukes@soci.au.dk
Source
BJOG. 2012 Sep;119(10):1222-31
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence - drug effects
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Wechsler Scales
Abstract
To examine the effects of binge alcohol consumption during early pregnancy, including the number of binge episodes and the timing of binge drinking, on general intelligence in 5-year-old children.
Follow-up study.
Neuropsychological testing in four Danish cities 2003-2008.
A cohort of 1617 women and their children sampled from the Danish National Birth Cohort.
Participants were sampled on the basis of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy. At 5 years of age the children were tested with six subtests from the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence - Revised (WPPSI-R). Parental education, maternal IQ, prenatal maternal smoking, the child's age at testing, the gender of the child, and tester were considered core confounding factors, whereas the full model also controlled for prenatal maternal average alcohol intake, maternal age, maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), parity, home environment, postnatal parental smoking, health status, and indicators for hearing and vision impairment.
WPPSI-R.
There were no systematic or significant differences in general intelligence between children of mothers reporting binge drinking and children of mothers with no binge episodes, except that binge drinking in gestational weeks 1-2 significantly reduced the risk of low, full-scale IQ (OR 0.54; 95% CI 0.31-0.96) when adjusted for core confounding factors. The results were otherwise not statistically significantly related to the number of binge episodes (with a maximum of 12) and timing of binge drinking.
We found no systematic association between binge drinking during early pregnancy and child intelligence. However, binge drinking reduced the risk of low, full-scale IQ in gestational weeks 1-2. This finding may be explained by residual confounding.
Notes
Comment In: BJOG. 2012 Dec;119(13):1670-1; author reply 1673-523164116
Comment In: BJOG. 2012 Dec;119(13):1671-2; author reply 1673-523164117
Comment In: BJOG. 2012 Dec;119(13):1672; author reply 1673-523164118
Erratum In: BJOG. 2012 Dec;119(13):1683
PubMed ID
22712770 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.