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Evaluation of a community health representative program among the Cree of northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226429
Source
Can J Public Health. 1991 May-Jun;82(3):181-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Lavallée
C A James
E J Robinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health, Montreal General Hospital, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1991 May-Jun;82(3):181-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Health Workers - education - standards
Consumer Satisfaction
Health education
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Patient Advocacy
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Role
Abstract
The James Bay Cree Community Health Representative (CHR) program was implemented in 1984 to train persons from the Cree population of northern Quebec to act as health care advocates and educators, as intermediaries between the Cree population, health services and local organizations, and as participants in assessing health needs. A formative evaluation was initiated which included quantitative analysis of the daily tasks of CHRs and a qualitative component based on documentary research, observation and semi-structured interviews. The evaluation revealed that CHRs actively participated in the ongoing community health programs mainly through health education; the people interviewed showed a high level of satisfaction. However, direct supervision, sufficient continuing education for the CHRs and better integration into health care teams are long-term goals which need to be emphasized in the program.
PubMed ID
1884312 View in PubMed
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High rates of infant macrosomia: a comparison of a Canadian native and a non-native population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199077
Source
J Nutr. 2000 Apr;130(4):806-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S. Rodrigues
E J Robinson
M S Kramer
K. Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
J Nutr. 2000 Apr;130(4):806-12
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Fetal Macrosomia - epidemiology - ethnology
Forecasting
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
The Cree of James Bay have the highest ever reported mean birth weight and a high prevalence of infant macrosomia. This study was designed to examine independent risk factors for infant macrosomia among the Cree, to compare these to risk factors among non-Native Canadians and to determine if ethnic differences persist after adjusting for differences in the distribution of other risk factors. Macrosomia was defined as birth weight >90(th) percentile for gestational age of a reference population. Independent determinants of macrosomia were examined in 385 Cree and 5644 non-Native women. The potential effect of ethnicity (Cree vs. non-Native) was determined after statistically adjusting for age, parity, pregravid weight, height, net rate of weight gain, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and smoking status. The prevalence of macrosomia among the Cree was 34.3% vs. 11.1% among non-Natives. Although GDM significantly increased the risk for macrosomia among the Cree (odds ratio: 4.46, 95% CI: 2.24-9.26), it was not a significant risk factor among non-Natives (odds ratio: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.79-1.65). The risk for infant macrosomia remained elevated among the Cree compared with non-Natives after adjusting for other risk factors (odds ratio: 3.64, 95% CI: 2.69-4.90). In conclusion, the Cree have a high prevalence of macrosomia despite controlling for important differences in pregravid weight and GDM. Some of this variation may be due to genetic differences in fetal growth. The differential impact of GDM on macrosomia in the two ethnic groups may be due to differences in treatment strategies for GDM.
PubMed ID
10736334 View in PubMed
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Interaction of body weight and ethnicity on risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200113
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Dec;70(6):1083-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
S. Rodrigues
E J Robinson
H. Ghezzo
K. Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Dec;70(6):1083-9
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Canada - epidemiology
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Medical Records
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
The James Bay Cree of Canada have one of the highest recorded rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among aboriginal people worldwide; the reasons for this elevated risk remain to be documented.
Our objective was to compare predictors and risk of GDM between the James Bay Cree and non-Native Canadians.
Risk for GDM was compared between Cree and non-Native women by 1) adjusting statistically for differences in age, parity, pregravid weight, and smoking status (n = 402 Cree, 7718 non-Natives), and 2) matching Cree women with non-Native women for age and pregravid weight (n = 394 Cree, 788 non-Natives). Dietary and physical activity information was available for a subset of Cree women (n = 152).
Age and pregravid weight were independent predictors of GDM in both Cree and non-Native women. After these predictors were controlled for, normal-weight (
PubMed ID
10584054 View in PubMed
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