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Accelerating client-driven care: pilot study for a social interaction approach to knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155589
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Carol L McWilliam
Anita Kothari
Beverly Leipert
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Mary Lou King
Marita Kloseck
Karen Ferguson
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. cmcwill@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Group Processes
Health Planning Councils
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This study piloted a knowledge translation (KT) intervention promoting evidence-based home care through social interaction. A total of 33 providers organized into 5 heterogeneous, geographically defined action groups participated in 5 researcher-facilitated meetings based on the participatory action model. The KT evidence reflects an empowering partnership approach to service delivery. Exploratory investigation included quantitative pre-post measurement of outcomes and qualitative description of data, presented herein. The critical reflections of the groups reveal macro-, meso-, and micro-level barriers to and facilitators of KT as well as recommendations for achieving KT. Insights gleaned from the findings have informed the evolution of the KT intervention to engage all 3 levels in addressing barriers and facilitators, with a conscious effort to transcend "push" and "pull" tendencies and enact transformative leadership. The findings suggest the merit of a more prolonged longitudinal investigation with expanded participation.
PubMed ID
18714898 View in PubMed
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Diagnosis and treatment of dementia: 4. Approach to management of mild to moderate dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154868
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):787-93
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-7-2008
Author
David B Hogan
Peter Bailey
Sandra Black
Anne Carswell
Howard Chertkow
Barry Clarke
Carole Cohen
John D Fisk
Dorothy Forbes
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Krista Lanctôt
Debra Morgan
Lilian Thorpe
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dhogan@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Oct 7;179(8):787-93
Date
Oct-7-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Combined Modality Therapy
Dementia - diagnosis - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Ontario
Physician-Patient Relations
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The management of mild to moderate dementia presents complex and evolving challenges. Practising physicians are often uncertain about the appropriate approaches to issues such as the disclosure of the diagnosis, driving and caregiver support. In this article, we provide practical guidance on management based on recommendations from the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia.
We developed evidence-based guidelines using systematic literature searches, with specific criteria for the selection and quality assessment of articles, and a clear and transparent decision-making process. We selected articles published from January 1996 to December 2005 that dealt with the management of mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer disease and other forms of dementia. Recommendations based on the literature review were drafted and voted on. Consensus required 80% or more agreement by participants. Subsequent to the conference, we searched for additional articles published from January 2006 to April 2008 using the same major keywords and secondary search terms. We graded the strength of evidence using the criteria of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
We identified 1615 articles, of which 954 were selected for further study. From a synthesis of the evidence in these studies, we made 48 recommendations for the management of mild to moderate dementia (28) and dementia with a cerebrovascular component (8) as well as recommendations for addressing ethical issues (e.g., disclosure of the diagnosis) (12). The updated literature review did not change these recommendations. In brief, patients and their families should be informed of the diagnosis. Although the specifics of managing comorbid conditions might require modification, standards of care and treatment targets would not change because of a mild dementia. The use of medications with anticholinergic effects should be minimized. There should be proactive planning for driving cessation, since this will be required at some point in the course of progressive dementia. The patient's ability to drive should be determined primarily on the basis of his or her functional abilities. An important aspect of care is supporting the patient's primary caregiver.
Much has been learned about the care of patients with mild to moderate dementia and the support of their primary caregivers. There is a pressing need for the development, and dissemination, of collaborative systems of care.
Notes
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Erratum In: CMAJ. 2008 Oct 21;179(9):932
PubMed ID
18838454 View in PubMed
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Family members providing home-based palliative care to older adults: the enactment of multiple roles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153033
Source
Can J Aging. 2008;27(3):267-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Sarah J Clemmer
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Author Affiliation
New Dundee, Ontario. sjclemmer@gmail.com
Source
Can J Aging. 2008;27(3):267-83
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Decision Making
Family - psychology
Female
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Palliative Care
Role
Abstract
Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis explores the enactment of multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care to seniors with advanced cancer. Family members had multiple expectations to provide care but felt their expectations of services were unmet. The process of enacting multiple roles was depicted by three interrelated themes: balancing, re-prioritizing, and evolving. Positive and negative health responses resulted from attempts to minimize personal health while simultaneously maintaining health. "True" family-centred care was found to be lacking, but should be a goal of health professionals involved in end-of-life care.
PubMed ID
19158043 View in PubMed
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How do registered nurses define rurality?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159399
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Feb;16(1):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Judith C Kulig
Mary Ellen Andrews
Norma J Stewart
Norma L Stewart
Roger Pitblado
Martha L P MacLeod
Donna Bentham
Carl D'Arcy
Debra Morgan
Dorothy Forbes
Gail Remus
Barbara Smith
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. kulig@uleth.ca
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Feb;16(1):28-32
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Career Choice
Humans
Licensure, Nursing
Life Style
Medically underserved area
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Professional Practice Location
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Rural health services - organization & administration
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this analysis was to identify the meaning of rurality for registered nurses (RNs) practising in rural and remote Canada.
An existing Statistics Canada definition was used to stratify Canada's 10 provinces into urban and rural areas. As part of a national multi-method study, a random sample of RNs in these rural strata, plus all RNs working in outpost settings and northern territories, were surveyed concerning the nature of nursing practice. Content analysis was used to identify themes from an open-ended question: 'How do you define rural/remote?' Refinement of the themes was conducted by the survey team and credibility was supported through investigator triangulation.
Of the 3933 RNs who responded to the survey (68% response rate), 3412 provided a definition of rural/remote. A subsample of 1285 RNs was used for detailed thematic analysis because these respondents provided definitions with a clear referent to rural and/or to remote; the remaining sample was used for verification of themes.
Four defining themes were identified by RNs for both rural and remote: community characteristics, geographical location, health human and technical resources, and nursing practice characteristics.
The themes can be used as content domains or dimensions of rurality to improve our understanding of how to describe rural communities, including geographical location and nursing practice, from the perspective of RNs.
Notes
Erratum In: Aust J Rural Health. 2009 Dec;17(6):350Stewart, Norma L [corrected to Stewart, Norma J]
PubMed ID
18186719 View in PubMed
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Improving access to dementia care: development and evaluation of a rural and remote memory clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152756
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2009 Jan;13(1):17-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Debra G Morgan
Margaret Crossley
Andrew Kirk
Carl D'Arcy
Norma Stewart
Jay Biem
Dorothy Forbes
Sheri Harder
Jenny Basran
Vanina Dal Bello-Haas
Lesley McBain
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. debra.morgan@usask.ca
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2009 Jan;13(1):17-30
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Dementia
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Memory
Middle Aged
Patient care team
Patient satisfaction
Program Development
Questionnaires
Remote Consultation
Rural Health Services
Saskatchewan
Videoconferencing
Abstract
The availability, accessibility and acceptability of services are critical factors in rural health service delivery. In Canada, the aging population and the consequent increase in prevalence of dementia challenge the ability of many rural communities to provide specialized dementia care. This paper describes the development, operation and evaluation of an interdisciplinary memory clinic designed to improve access to diagnosis and management of early stage dementia for older persons living in rural and remote areas in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. We describe the clinic structure, processes and clinical assessment, as well as the evaluation research design and instruments. Finally, we report the demographic characteristics and geographic distribution of individuals referred during the first three years.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19197686 View in PubMed
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Informal caregivers' hopes and expectations of a referral to a memory clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104913
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Feb;102:111-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Debra G Morgan
Sheena Walls-Ingram
Allison Cammer
Megan E O'Connell
Margaret Crossley
Vanina Dal Bello-Haas
Dorothy Forbes
Anthea Innes
Andrew Kirk
Norma Stewart
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Canada. Electronic address: debra.morgan@usask.ca.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Feb;102:111-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Canada
Caregivers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Dementia - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Hope
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health Services
Abstract
Although only 20-50% of individuals with dementia are diagnosed, early diagnosis enables patients and families to access interventions and services, and plan for the future. The current study explored the experiences of rural family caregivers in the period leading up to a diagnostic assessment at a Canadian memory clinic, their hopes and expectations of the assessment, and their experiences in the six months following diagnosis. Using a longitudinal, retrospective and prospective qualitative research design, caregivers of 30 patients referred to the clinic were interviewed during the diagnostic assessment process and again six months after the diagnosis. Most caregivers reported first noticing symptoms two years prior to diagnosis. The pre-diagnostic interviews revealed a prevalent 'need to know' among caregivers that drove the help-seeking process. Caregivers hoped that the diagnosis would have the benefits of 'naming it,' 'accessing treatment,' 'knowing what to expect,' and 'receiving guidance.' When asked six months later about the impact of the diagnosis, the main theme was 'acceptance and moving forward.' Caregivers reported that the diagnosis provided 'relief,' 'validation,' and 'improved access to services.' These findings can inform care practices of primary health care providers who represent the first point of contact regarding expectations and experiences of dementia-related diagnoses.
PubMed ID
24565148 View in PubMed
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Knowledge-to-action processes in SHRTN collaborative communities of practice: a study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137150
Source
Implement Sci. 2011;6:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
James Conklin
Anita Kothari
Paul Stolee
Larry Chambers
Dorothy Forbes
Ken Le Clair
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Implement Sci. 2011;6:12
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Community Networks - organization & administration - standards
Consumer Participation - methods
Cooperative Behavior
Health Services Research - methods
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Ontario
Program Development
Abstract
The Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN) Collaborative is a network of networks that work together to improve the health and health care of Ontario seniors. The collaborative facilitates knowledge exchange through a library service, knowledge brokers (KBs), local implementation teams, collaborative technology, and, most importantly, Communities of Practice (CoPs) whose members work together to identify innovations, translate evidence, and help implement changes.This project aims to increase our understanding of knowledge-to-action (KTA) processes mobilized through SHRTN CoPs that are working to improve the health of Ontario seniors. For this research, KTA refers to the movement of research and experience-based knowledge between social contexts, and the use of that knowledge to improve practice. We will examine the KTA processes themselves, as well as the role of human agents within those processes. The conceptual framework we have adopted to inform our research is the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework.
This study will use a multiple case study design (minimum of nine cases over three years) to investigate how SHRTN CoPs work and pursue knowledge exchange in different situations. Each case will yield a unique narrative, framed around the three PARIHS dimensions: evidence, context, and facilitation. Together, the cases will shed light on how SHRTN CoPs approach their knowledge exchange initiatives, and how they respond to challenges and achieve their objectives. Data will be collected using interviews, document analysis, and ethnographic observation.
This research will generate new knowledge about the defining characteristics of CoPs operating in the health system, on leadership roles in CoPs, and on the nature of interaction processes, relationships, and knowledge exchange mechanisms. Our work will yield a better understanding of the factors that contribute to the success or failure of KTA initiatives, and create a better understanding of how local caregiving contexts interact with specific initiatives. Our participatory design will allow stakeholders to influence the practical usefulness of our findings and contribute to improved health services delivery for seniors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21310083 View in PubMed
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A profile of registered nurses in rural and remote Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174828
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):122-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Norma J Stewart
Carl D'Arcy
J Roger Pitblado
Debra G Morgan
Dorothy Forbes
Gail Remus
Barbara Smith
Mary Ellen Andrews
Julie Kosteniuk
Judith C Kulig
Martha L P MacLeod
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. norma.stewart@usask.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):122-45
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Turnover
Professional Autonomy
Questionnaires
Rural health services - organization & administration
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
Research on nursing practice issues in rural and remote areas of Canada is very limited. This report describes the method and initial results of a comprehensive survey of registered nurses (RNs) practising outside the commuting zones of large urban centres, designed to determine: who practises nursing in rural and remote Canada; the nature and scope of their nursing practice; and their satisfaction with their work, community, and practice supports. Using a mailed questionnaire with persistent follow-up, the data-collection frame included a stratified random sample of rural RNs and the full population of RNs who worked in the northern territories and outpost ("remote") settings. The analyses focus on regional comparisons of demographics and primary work settings and on provincial comparisons of satisfaction levels related to work and community. The survey is part of a larger multi-method project intended to inform policy on rural nursing practice in Canada.
PubMed ID
15887769 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.