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An exploratory study of diabetes in a First Nation community with respect to serum concentrations of p,p'-DDE and PCBs and fish consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146289
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):3179-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Aline Philibert
Harold Schwartz
Donna Mergler
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Montréal, Québec, Canada. philibert.aline@uqam.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):3179-89
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Biological Markers
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nutritional Status
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the association between self-reported diabetes, fish consumption and serum levels of organochlorines in a First Nation community. One quarter of the 101 participants reported diabetes. Serum PCBs, but not p,p'-DDE, were positively correlated to consumption frequency of total fish, walleye and pike, but not trout. Reported diabetes was positively associated to p,p'-DDE and some PCB congeners. Odds Ratios (OR) for reported diabetes for those in the upper 75th percentile for serum p,p'-DDE compared to the others were 3.5 (95% CI 1-13.8) and 6.1 (95% CI 1.4-27.3) (weight wet and lipid-standardized values, respectively) and for total sum of PCBs: 4.91 (95% CI 1.4-19.0) and 5.51 (95% CI 1.3-24.1). For participants who were in the upper 50th percentile for trout and white fish intake, reported diabetes was respectively 6 and 4 times lower compared to the others. These findings support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to elevated p,p'-DDE and PCBs is associated with increased risk of diabetes. Consumption of trout and white fish may be beneficial to reduce risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20049255 View in PubMed
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A comparative study of manganese and lead levels in human umbilical cords and maternal blood from two urban centers exposed to different gasoline additives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189600
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2002 May 6;290(1-3):157-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-2002
Author
Audrey Smargiassi
Larissa Takser
André Masse
Martin Sergerie
Donna Mergler
Geneviève St-Amour
Philippe Blot
Georgette Hellier
Guy Huel
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada. c3604@nobel.si.uqam.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2002 May 6;290(1-3):157-64
Date
May-6-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carcinogens, Environmental - chemistry
Female
Gasoline
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lead - blood
Male
Manganese - blood
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Organometallic Compounds - chemistry
Paris
Pregnancy
Quebec
Umbilical Cord - chemistry
Urban Population
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
Manganese (Mn) and lead (Pb) are two neurotoxic chemicals and experimental evidence suggests that they can cross the placental barrier. Tetraethyl lead was still in use as an antiknock agent in Paris during the sampling period of the study, while it has been replaced by methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) in Canada since 1977. By 1990, MMT was in 100% of gasoline in Canada. In a study of 160 pairs of mothers-neonates in Montreal and 206 pairs in Paris, we compared levels of Mn and Pb in the umbilical cord and in maternal blood. Neonates and mothers had significantly higher Pb levels in Paris where lead additives were still used in gasoline. Geometric mean maternal blood Pb levels were 5.4 microg/dl compared to 2.1 microg/dl in Montreal and cord blood Pb levels were 3.2 microg/dl in Parisian mothers compared to 1.7 microg/dl in Montreal. The prevalence of Paris Pb values superior to the 95th percentile of the Montreal distribution was highly elevated in all media studied. The prevalence of high Mn levels in umbilical cord blood was also significantly higher in Montreal. Surveillance programs are important to limit Pb overexposure and associated neurological effects in neonates where tetraethyl Pb is still in use as a gasoline additive. Since Mn is an essential element and dietary Mn intake may differ between Montreal and Paris, the difference observed with regard to high Mn values between Montreal and Paris cannot, at this time, be attributed to MMT in Montreal's gasoline. Further studies are needed to infer an association between Mn emissions from MMT and prenatal exposure to Mn.
Notes
Erratum In: Sci Total Environ. 2002 Dec 2;300(1-3):247
PubMed ID
12083707 View in PubMed
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Ecosystem matters: fish consumption, mercury intake and exposure among fluvial lake fish-eaters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154629
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Dec 15;407(1):154-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2008
Author
Nadia Abdelouahab
Claire Vanier
Mary Baldwin
Steve Garceau
Marc Lucotte
Donna Mergler
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Montréal (Québec), Canada H3C 3P8. Abdelouahab.nadia@courrier.uqam.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2008 Dec 15;407(1):154-64
Date
Dec-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Ecosystem
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Fish Products - analysis - standards
Food chain
Food contamination - analysis
Food Habits
Fresh Water - analysis
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis - blood
Ontario
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - blood
Abstract
Many studies use the number of fish meals as an estimate of Hg intake, although fish Hg concentrations, even within the same species, can greatly vary. Furthermore, most freshwater advisories only refer to local catch, while market fish advisories only focus on market fish, although both can contribute to Hg body burden. The present study, carried out in lakeside communities from 2 ecosystems in Quebec, Canada, sought to (i) estimate Hg intake from local freshwater sources, hunted waterfowl and market fish and seafood, and (ii) examine the relations between fish consumption, estimated Hg intake and biomarkers of exposure. A total of 238 adults (18-74 years), who had consumed local catch within the past three months, responded to an extensive interview-administered fish and waterfowl frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric measures were taken and a self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain socio-demographic information. Hg intake was estimated as microg Hg/kg body weight/day. Blood and hair samples were analyzed for Hg content. Results showed that persons from one ecosystem ate significantly more fish compared to those from the other (median: 52.1 g/day vs 38.9 g/day), but presented significantly lower concentrations of hair Hg (median: 448.0 ng/g vs 730.5 ng/g), blood organic Hg (median: 1.1 microg/L vs 3.4 microg/L) and inorganic Hg (median: 0.4 microg/L vs 0.8 microg/L). Median daily total Hg intake was 0.080 microg/kg bw/day for the former community and 0.141 microg/kg bw/day for the latter. Overall, 59.5% from the first ecosystem and 41.0% from the other, exceeded the US EPA RfD (0.1 microg/kg bw/day), while 13.2% and 6.0%, respectively, exceeded the Canadian tolerable daily intake (0.47 microg/kg bw/day) for adults. For the two groups, freshwater fish consumption frequency, but not total fish, was positively associated with bioindicators of Hg while estimated Hg intake from freshwater catch as well as from total fish consumption were positively related to Hg biomarkers. There was a positive relation between consumption and estimated Hg intake from freshwater fish and blood inorganic Hg. These findings indicate that the number of fish can be a poor surrogate for Hg exposure. The differences observed here for Hg intake and exposure reflect ecosystem disparities in fish diversity and Hg bioaccumulation. Studies and advisories need to consider Hg fish concentrations and fish-eating patterns in different ecosystems, as well as the contribution of market fish. The relation between fish consumption and inorganic Hg exposure, reported as well in other studies, needs to be further investigated.
PubMed ID
18937964 View in PubMed
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Effects of low concentrations of organochlorine compounds in women on calcium transfer in human placental syncytiotrophoblast.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183685
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2003 Nov;76(1):182-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Annie Hamel
Donna Mergler
Larissa Takser
Lucie Simoneau
Julie Lafond
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Physiologie materno-foetale, Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada H3C 3P8.
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2003 Nov;76(1):182-9
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Transport - drug effects
Calcium - blood - metabolism
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood - metabolism
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - adverse effects - blood - metabolism
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Maternal-Fetal Exchange - drug effects
Pregnancy
Quebec
Trophoblasts - cytology - drug effects - metabolism
Abstract
For most Canadians, food represents one of the major sources of environmental contaminants. Among them, organochlorine compounds (OCs) are known to affect calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. They are neurotoxic by perturbation of Ca2+ channels and pumps, and they interfere with protein kinase C (PKC) and Ca2+ binding protein (CaBP). Ca2+ is an essential element to adequate fetal growth and development. The aim of the present study is to determine the relation between low environmental maternal exposure to OCs, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB 153), Aroclor 1260, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-dichloroethane (DDE), Ca2+ levels in serum and placenta, placental Ca2+ transfer, and newborn development. Total Ca2+ and OCs were measured in women's serum samples, as well as in umbilical cord's serum and placenta at term. Placentas were taken for trophoblast cells isolation and Ca2+ incorporation kinetic experiments. Our results were obtained from 30 pregnant women from the southwestern area of Quebec. Concentrations of Aroclor 1260, PCB 153, DDE, and DDT were respectively 6.1, 6.0, 3.1, and 2.9 times lower in the umbilical cord serum than in the mother's serum at term. In the placenta, DDE was accumulated at higher levels than other contaminants. A tendency towards an inverse relation was observed for in OCs found in three compartments and Ca2+ levels in maternal serum and in placental tissues. Maternal Ca2+ concentrations do not influence Ca2+ uptake by syncytiotrophoblast. Only DDE (>/=0.70 mug/l) in maternal serum significantly was associated with a small increase in Ca2+ uptake by syncytiotrophoblast. This study will help us determine if low OC contamination significantly modifies Ca2+ transfer in syncytiotrophoblast.
PubMed ID
12970576 View in PubMed
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Gender differences in the effects of organochlorines, mercury, and lead on thyroid hormone levels in lakeside communities of Quebec (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158523
Source
Environ Res. 2008 Jul;107(3):380-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Nadia Abdelouahab
Donna Mergler
Larissa Takser
Claire Vanier
Melissa St-Jean
Mary Baldwin
Philip A Spear
Hing Man Chan
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Biologie, Santé, Société et Environnement CINBIOSE, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Abdelouahab.nadia@courrier.uqam.ca
Source
Environ Res. 2008 Jul;107(3):380-92
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Endocrine Disruptors - blood - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Fishes
Food Habits
Fresh Water
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Lead - blood - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Male
Mercury - blood - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Middle Aged
Quebec
Sex Characteristics
Thyroid Hormones - blood
Abstract
Environmental chemicals can disrupt endocrine balance and in particular thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. However, studies differ with respect to thyroid profile changes and gender differences are rarely examined. This study investigated the THs, triodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), in relation to serum organochlorines (OCs), bioindicators of mercury (Hg) and blood lead (Pb) in 211 freshwater fish consumers (124 men and 87 women) from two communities in Canada. Thyroid hormones were within the normal range and the bioindicators of exposure were low compared to other reports on fish consumers. Stratified analysis showed that for women, serum T3 concentrations were negatively related to serum concentrations of PCB 138, PCB 153, the non-coplanar congeners, Arochlor 1260, and SigmaPCB, as well as p,p'-DDE. No relations were observed between T4 and any of the chemicals measured, but TSH was negatively related to blood Pb. For men, serum T4 was inversely related to PCB 138, non-ortho-substituted (dioxin-like) PCBs and SigmaPCB. A significant positive relationship was observed between serum TSH and different PCB congeners (PCB 138, PCB 180, non-coplanar congeners, mono-ortho coplanar congeners, dioxin-like PCBs), as well as SigmaPCB. Serum TSH increased with hair and blood Hg concentrations and was highest among those in the highest 50th percentile for both Hg and dioxin-like PCB congeners compared to the others. No associations were observed for T3 in men. These findings suggest that even at low concentrations, these environmental contaminants can interfere with thyroid status and effects may differ by gender.
PubMed ID
18313043 View in PubMed
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Hair manganese and hyperactive behaviors: pilot study of school-age children exposed through tap water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164597
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Jan;115(1):122-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Maryse Bouchard
François Laforest
Louise Vandelac
David Bellinger
Donna Mergler
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la biologie, la santé, la société et I'environnement (CINBIOSE), Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Jan;115(1):122-7
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Biological Markers - analysis
Child
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Male
Manganese - analysis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychomotor Agitation - epidemiology - etiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Schools
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Neurotoxic effects are known to occur with inhalation of manganese particulates, but very few data are available on exposure to Mn in water. We undertook a pilot study in a community in Quebec (Canada) where naturally occurring high Mn levels were present in the public water system. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that greater exposure to Mn via drinking water would be reflected in higher Mn content in hair which, in turn, would be associated with increased level of hyperactive behaviors.
Forty-six children participated in the study, 24 boys and 22 girls, 6-15 years of age (median, 11 years). Their homes received water from one of two wells (W) with different Mn concentrations: WI: mean 610 microg/L; W2: mean 160 microg/L. The Revised Conners' Rating Scale for parents (CPRS-R) and for teachers (CTRS-R) were administered, providing T-scores on the following subscales: Oppositional, Hyperactivity, Cognitive Problems/Inattention, and ADHD Index.
Children whose houses were supplied by WI had higher hair Mn (MnH) than those supplied by W2 (mean 6.2+/-4.7 microg/g vs. 3.3+/-3.0 microg/g, p = 0.025). MnH was significantly associated with T-scores on the CTRS-R Oppositional (p = 0.020) and Hyperactivity (p = 0.002) subscales, after adjustment for age, sex, and income. All children with Oppositional and Hyperactivity T-scores > 65 had MnH > 3.0 microg/g.
The findings of this pilot study are sufficiently compelling to warrant more extensive investigations into the risks of Mn exposure in drinking water.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17366831 View in PubMed
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Introduction: women's occupational and environmental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169233
Source
Environ Res. 2006 Jun;101(2):147-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Karen Messing
Donna Mergler
Source
Environ Res. 2006 Jun;101(2):147-8
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Occupational Health
Women's health
PubMed ID
16709470 View in PubMed
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Low environmental contamination by lead in pregnant women: effect on calcium transfer in human placental syncytiotrophoblasts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179573
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Jul 23;67(14):1069-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2004
Author
Julie Lafond
Annie Hamel
Larissa Takser
Cathy Vaillancourt
Donna Mergler
Author Affiliation
Laboratoire de Physiologie Materno-Foetale and Centre d'étude des interactions biologiques entre la santé et l'environnement (CINBOISE), Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Québec, Canada. lafond.julie@uqam.ca
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2004 Jul 23;67(14):1069-79
Date
Jul-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Biological Transport, Active
Biopsy
Calcium - metabolism
Calcium Channels - metabolism
Calcium-Binding Proteins - metabolism
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry - metabolism
Homeostasis
Humans
Lead - analysis - metabolism
Lead Poisoning - diagnosis - etiology - metabolism
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Placenta - chemistry - metabolism
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - etiology - metabolism
Protein Kinases - metabolism
Quebec
Questionnaires
Tissue Distribution
Trophoblasts - metabolism
Abstract
There is an extensive literature on the neurotoxic effects of lead (Pb) on the developing fetus; however, little is known about the mechanisms of action at low levels. Heavy metals are known to affect calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis through perturbation of Ca2+ channels and pumps and interference with protein kinase C (PKC) and Ca2+ binding protein (CaBP). During pregnancy, placental Ca2+ exchange is one of the most important mechanisms for fetal survival. This ion is an essential element for healthy fetal growth and development. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of low maternal blood Pb levels on Ca2+ levels in serum and placenta and placental Ca2+ transfer. Blood samples (maternal and cord) and placental tissue were obtained at birth from 30 women residing in southwest Quebec. Total Ca2+ and Pb levels were measured in maternal and umbilical cord samples and placental tissue at term. The placentas were taken for trophoblast cell isolation and Ca2+ incorporation kinetic experiments. Data showed that Ca2+ in maternal blood did not influence Ca2+ uptake by syncytiotrophoblast. However, although maternal and cord blood Pb levels were low, maternal blood Pb concentration was significantly linked to a decrease in Ca2+ uptake by syncytiotrophoblast. This suggests that exposure to very levels of Pb significantly modifies Ca2+ transfer in syncytiotrophoblasts.
PubMed ID
15205024 View in PubMed
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Manganese levels during pregnancy and at birth: relation to environmental factors and smoking in a Southwest Quebec population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180082
Source
Environ Res. 2004 Jun;95(2):119-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Larissa Takser
Julie Lafond
Maryse Bouchard
Genevieve St-Amour
Donna Mergler
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, Université DU Quebec à Montreal, C.P. 8888, Succ.Centre Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8, Canada. c1120@er.uqam.ca
Source
Environ Res. 2004 Jun;95(2):119-25
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Demography
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Manganese - blood
Pesticides
Pregnancy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Manganese (Mn) is both an essential element and a potent neurotoxin. Higher demand during pregnancy leads to increased blood levels. Previous studies have suggested that environmental factors may influence blood Mn levels. As part of a community-based survey of potentially toxic environmental contaminants among pregnant women, the objective of this exploratory study was to examine the Mn status in pregnant women and their newborns with respect to sociodemographic and environmental variables. Pregnant women from Southwest Quebec were recruited in the first or second trimester through the public health prenatal program Mn was analyzed in mother's blood at entry into the study, in the second trimester (for those who entered during the first trimester), and at delivery, as well as in umbilical cord blood and in placental tissue. Sociodemographic data and information about pregnancy were obtained by two questionnaires; the first was administered at study entry and the second a few weeks following birth. Results showed that mothers' Mn blood levels increased significantly during pregnancy and cord blood Mn levels were significantly higher than those for mothers' blood. There was no relation to age. Smokers had significantly lower Mn blood levels compared to nonsmokers at the second trimester. Those who lived in urban and/or agricultural areas had significantly higher levels compared to those who lived in small villages. Those who reported pesticide spraying less than 1 km from their house likewise had significantly higher levels compared to the others. These findings suggest that lifestyle and environmental factors may interfere with the delicate balance and homeostatic mechanisms required to maintain Mn at optimal levels for physiological changes during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
15147916 View in PubMed
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Material safety data sheets: their use in Qu├ębec workers' compensation appeals involving neurotoxic chemical exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185384
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Jun;18(6):405-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Mary Baldwin
Katherine Lippel
Marie-Claire Lefèbvre
Donna Mergler
Author Affiliation
Centre pour l'étude des interactions biologiques entre la santé et l'environnement (CINBIOSE), University of Québec, Montreal, Québec, Canada. baldwin@vax2.concordia.ca
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Jun;18(6):405-12
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hazardous Substances
Humans
Neurotoxicity Syndromes - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Organizational Case Studies
Quebec
Risk Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Workers' Compensation - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
12746062 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.