Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

9 records – page 1 of 1.

2007 Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations: management of hypertension by nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162877
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007;17(2):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Donna McLean
Kori Kingsbury
Jo-Anne Costello
Lyne Cloutier
Sandra Matheson
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007;17(2):10-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Comorbidity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - nursing - prevention & control
Life Style
Patient compliance
Abstract
Recent data from the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that nearly one billion people in the world are suffering from hypertension. Forecasts suggest that, with the aging of the population, this number could reach 1.5 billion by 2025 (Kearney, Whelton, & Reynolds, 2005). In developed countries, more than one in five adults have hypertension (Vasan, Beiser, Seshadri, Larson, Kannel, & D'Agostino, 2002). Statistics for Canada reveal that fewer than 15% of those diagnosed with hypertension are adequately controlled (Joffres, Hamet, MacLean, L'italien, & Fodor, 2001). Part of the effort to improve hypertension detection, assessment and treatment is an annual process to produce and update evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension and to implement the recommendations (Zarnke, Campbell, McAlister, & Levine, 2000; Campbell, Nagpal, & Drouin, 2001). The most up-to-date 2007 Canadian recommendations for the assessment and management of hypertension are presented. Contemporary nursing practice requires that nurses take responsibility and a role in the primary prevention, detection and treatment of hypertension.
PubMed ID
17583316 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2010 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part I - blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143445
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):241-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Robert R Quinn
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Raj S Padwal
Martin G Myers
Lyne Cloutier
Peter Bolli
Donald W McKay
Nadia A Khan
Michael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Daniel G Hackam
Steven Grover
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Finlay A McAlister
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Donna McLean
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Alberta. rob.quinn@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 May;26(5):241-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Quality of Health Care
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2008 to October 2009 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Changes to the recommendations for 2010 relate to automated office blood pressure measurements. Automated office blood pressure measurements can be used in the assessment of office blood pressure. When used under proper conditions, an automated office systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher should be considered analogous to a mean awake ambulatory systolic blood pressure of 135 mmHg or higher and diastolic blood pressure of 85 mmHg or higher, respectively.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 63 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. To be approved, all recommendations were required to be supported by at least 70% of task force members. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Aug;114(2 Suppl 4th Report):555-7615286277
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-3817534459
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Jan;83(1):356-621984895
Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1571-68622248
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1996 Jul 8;156(13):1414-208678709
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Mar 23;158(6):655-629521231
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2005;5(1):1815985180
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-5616003448
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2005 Oct;10(5):257-6216205444
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-5017534460
Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 2007 Jul;21(7):588-9017377600
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Nov 26;167(21):2296-30318039987
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Mar;21(3):280-318219304
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-6318548142
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):465-7518548143
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Jul 9;300(2):197-20818612117
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2008 Oct;13(5):299-30318799957
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2008 Oct;62(10):1484-9818691228
Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Feb;27(2):280-619155785
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-8619417858
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):287-9819417859
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2009 Jun;14(3):108-1119417634
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Sep 29;54(14):1209-2719778661
Cites: Am Heart J. 2000 Feb;139(2 Pt 1):272-8110650300
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2001 Apr;6(2):107-1011433132
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jul 11;286(2):180-711448281
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2001 Jun;6(3):161-511518840
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Dec 14;360(9349):1903-1312493255
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):987-100312788299
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Nov 29;362(9398):1776-714654312
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Jan;43(1):10-714638619
Cites: Blood Press Monit. 2006 Apr;11(2):59-6216534406
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-8116755312
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):606-1316755316
Cites: J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2007 Apr;9(4):267-7017396069
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
PubMed ID
20485688 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2011 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132607
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;27(4):415-433.e1-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Doreen M Rabi
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Raj S Padwal
Nadia A Khan
Steven A Grover
Daniel G Hackam
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Robert R Quinn
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Lyne Cloutier
Peter Bolli
Michael D Hill
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Donna McLean
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Tavis S Campbell
M Patrice Lindsay
Robert J Herman
Pierre Larochelle
Ross D Feldman
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Richard Lewanczuk
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Mukul Sharma
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George K Dresser
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Richard E Gilbert
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Philip A McFarlane
Robert A Hegele
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. doreen.rabi@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;27(4):415-433.e1-2
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Health education
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2011. The major guideline changes this year are: (1) a recommendation was made for using comparative risk analogies when communicating a patient's cardiovascular risk; (2) diagnostic testing issues for renal artery stenosis were discussed; (3) recommendations were added for the management of hypertension during the acute phase of stroke; (4) people with hypertension and diabetes are now considered high risk for cardiovascular events if they have elevated urinary albumin excretion, overt kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, or the presence of other cardiovascular risk factors; (5) the combination of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (CCB) is preferred over the combination of an ACE inhibitor and a thiazide diuretic in persons with diabetes and hypertension; and (6) a recommendation was made to coordinate with pharmacists to improve antihypertensive medication adherence. We also discussed the recent analyses that examined the association between angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and cancer.
PubMed ID
21801975 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2012 Canadian hypertension education program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124290
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert R Quinn
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Daniel G Hackam
Simon W Rabkin
Doreen M Rabi
Richard E Gilbert
Raj S Padwal
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Tavis S Campbell
Lyne Cloutier
Steven Grover
George Honos
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas Wilson
Ross D Feldman
M Patrice Lindsay
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Norman R C Campbell
Debra Reid
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. stella.daskalopoulou@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - methods
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - standards
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2012. The new recommendations are: (1) use of home blood pressure monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of white coat syndrome; (2) mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may be used in selected patients with hypertension and systolic heart failure; (3) a history of atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension should not be a factor in deciding to prescribe an angiotensin-receptor blocker for the treatment of hypertension; and (4) the blood pressure target for patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease has now been changed to
PubMed ID
22595447 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2013 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115112
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Daniel G Hackam
Robert R Quinn
Pietro Ravani
Doreen M Rabi
Kaberi Dasgupta
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert J Herman
Simon L Bacon
Lyne Cloutier
Martin Dawes
Simon W Rabkin
Richard E Gilbert
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Tavis S Campbell
Steven Grover
George Honos
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas W Wilson
Ross D Feldman
Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Kim L Lavoie
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George B Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
S Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Debra J Reid
Sheldon W Tobe
Luc Poirier
Raj S Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. dhackam@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Exercise - physiology
Health education
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2013. This year's update includes 2 new recommendations. First, among nonhypertensive or stage 1 hypertensive individuals, the use of resistance or weight training exercise does not adversely influence blood pressure (BP) (Grade D). Thus, such patients need not avoid this type of exercise for fear of increasing BP. Second, and separately, for very elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension (age 80 years or older), the target for systolic BP should be
PubMed ID
23541660 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2014 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104360
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5):485-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Kaberi Dasgupta
Robert R Quinn
Kelly B Zarnke
Doreen M Rabi
Pietro Ravani
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Simon W Rabkin
Luc Trudeau
Ross D Feldman
Lyne Cloutier
Ally Prebtani
Robert J Herman
Simon L Bacon
Richard E Gilbert
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Tavis S Campbell
Steven Grover
George Honos
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas W Wilson
Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Shelagh B Coutts
Gord Gubitz
Mark Gelfer
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Kevin D Burns
Robert J Petrella
Swapnil Hiremath
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Kim L Lavoie
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George B Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
S Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Milan Khara
Andrew Pipe
Paul Oh
Peter Selby
Mukul Sharma
Debra J Reid
Sheldon W Tobe
Raj S Padwal
Luc Poirier
Author Affiliation
Divisions of General Internal Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology and Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, McGill University, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: kaberi.dasgupta@mcgill.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5):485-501
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - prevention & control
Life Style
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Herein, updated evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in Canadian adults are detailed. For 2014, 3 existing recommendations were modified and 2 new recommendations were added. The following recommendations were modified: (1) the recommended sodium intake threshold was changed from = 1500 mg (3.75 g of salt) to approximately 2000 mg (5 g of salt) per day; (2) a pharmacotherapy treatment initiation systolic blood pressure threshold of = 160 mm Hg was added in very elderly (age = 80 years) patients who do not have diabetes or target organ damage (systolic blood pressure target in this population remains at
PubMed ID
24786438 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hypertension in Russia: Changes Observed After 4 Years of a Comprehensive Health System Improvement Program in the Yaroslavl Region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286168
Source
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2017 Feb;19(2):198-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Maria Mozheyko
Sergey Eregin
Natalia Danilenko
Alexey Vigdorchik
Sheldon W Tobe
Norman Campbell
Donna McLean
Zhanna Baskakova
Ilnaz Klimovskaia
Krishnan Ramanathan
David Hughes
Source
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2017 Feb;19(2):198-204
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Determination
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Management
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Stroke - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Rates of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in Russia have been among the highest in Europe. A comprehensive health system improvement program targeting better diagnosis and control of hypertension was undertaken in the Yaroslavl Region of Russia. This initiative was a joint program between clinicians, the Department of Health and Pharmacy of the Yaroslavl Region, and Novartis Pharma LLC. From 2011 to 2014, the blood pressure control rate improved substantially (94% relative improvement), the percentage of patients with a systolic blood pressure =180 mm Hg decreased (from 10% to 5%), and there was a reduction in stroke incidence rate from 4.6 to 3.7 per 1000 population. During this same period, significant changes were made to the way hypertension was diagnosed and treated across all regional government polyclinics, and the use of antihypertensive therapies increased.
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Aug 20;9(8):e10328025141122
Cites: J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2013 Dec;15(12):918-2424118731
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Mar;53(3):480-619204180
Cites: JAMA. 2013 Aug 21;310(7):699-70523989679
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Jun 23;180(13):E118-2519546444
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):1007-1321576297
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2016 May;32(5):687-9426711315
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Aug 07;14:80125098940
Cites: Curr Opin Cardiol. 2014 Jul;29(4):324-3025029450
Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 2004 Aug;18(8):553-615002003
Cites: Adv Ther. 2012 Dec;29(12):1016-2523203238
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Feb;53(2):128-3419114646
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2014 Mar 27;11:E4824674634
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2015 Nov 26;373(22):2103-1626551272
Cites: Hypertension. 2006 Jan;47(1):22-816344380
PubMed ID
27534595 View in PubMed
Less detail

Recognition and management of hypertension by nurses: action in patients with diabetes is critical.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147090
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2009;19(4):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Dorothy Morris
Donna McLean
Jo-Anne Costello
Lyne Cloutier
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Island Health Authority (Royal Jubilee Hospital), Victoria, BC dorothy.morris@viha.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2009;19(4):4-12
Date
2009
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications - complications
Early Diagnosis
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Life Style
Mass Screening - methods
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment - methods
Patient Education as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
World Health
Abstract
The Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP), Canadian Hypertension Society, Blood Pressure Canada, Canadian Diabetes Association, College of Family Physicians of Canada, Canadian Pharmacists Association, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, and the Canadian Council of Cardiovascular Nurses issued a recent call for all health care professionals in Canada to double their efforts to assist patients with diabetes in maintaining target blood pressures (Campbell et al., 2009b). Blood pressure (B/P) in diabetic individuals should be less than 130 mmHg systolic and less than 80 mmHg diastolic (CHEP 2009). Considering recognition and treatment of hypertension in people with diabetes can result in reductions in disability and death, control of hypertension must become an interdisciplinary priority. Maintaining B/P less than 130/80 mmHg requires lifestyle modification as the cornerstone to treatment and often two or more B/P medications (Campbell et al., 2009a). The cost of multiple drugs required for B/P control in diabetic individuals is one of the few treatments estimated to reduce overall health costs and related cardiovascular disease complications (Gillies, Abrams, & Lambert, 2007). Nurses are essential partners in assessing and assisting diabetic patients and all patients with hypertension to reduce overall cardiovascular risks. Nurses may also be key practitioners in assessing and monitoring patient difficulties with adherence to lifestyle or pharmacological interventions (Jayasinghe, 2009; McLean et al., 2008). Individualized lifestyle counselling and treatment modification are recommended to maintain target B/P and treat dysglycemia, dyslipidemia, smoking or any other cardiovascular risks in diabetic individuals.
PubMed ID
19947306 View in PubMed
Less detail

World Health Organization celebrates World Health Day, April 7,2013--focusing on hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113171
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2013;23(2):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013

9 records – page 1 of 1.