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2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174812
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2005
Author
Don Yee
Alysa Fairchild
Mira Keyes
Jim Butler
George Dundas
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Date
Jun-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Radiation Oncology - education
Abstract
Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences.
Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey.
Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns.
Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.
PubMed ID
15890597 View in PubMed
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Single-nucleotide polymorphisms studied for associations with urinary toxicity from (125)I prostate brachytherapy implants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256490
Source
Brachytherapy. 2014 May-Jun;13(3):285-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nawaid Usmani
Nelson Leong
Kevin Martell
Lanna Lan
Sunita Ghosh
Nadeem Pervez
John Pedersen
Don Yee
Albert Murtha
John Amanie
Ron Sloboda
David Murray
Matthew Parliament
Author Affiliation
Division of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: Nawaid.Usmani@albertahealthservices.ca.
Source
Brachytherapy. 2014 May-Jun;13(3):285-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Alberta
Brachytherapy - adverse effects - methods
DNA-Binding Proteins
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - genetics - radiotherapy
Retrospective Studies
Urologic Diseases - etiology - genetics
Abstract
To identify clinical, dosimetric, and genetic factors that are associated with late urinary toxicity after a (125)I prostate brachytherapy implant.
Genomic DNA from 296 men treated with (125)I prostate brachytherapy monotherapy was extracted from saliva samples for this study. A retrospective database was compiled including clinical, dosimetric, and toxicity data for this cohort of patients. Fourteen candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) from 13 genes (TP53, ERCC2, GSTP1, NOS, TGFß1, MSH6, RAD51, ATM, LIG4, XRCC1, XRCC3, GSTA1, and SOD2) were tested in this cohort for correlations with toxicity.
This study identified 217 men with at least 2 years of followup. Of these, 39 patients developed Grade =2 late urinary complications with a transurethral resection of prostate, urethral stricture, gross hematuria, or a sustained increase in their International Prostate Symptom Score. The only clinical or dosimetric factor that was associated with late urinary toxicity was age (p = 0.02). None of the 14 SNPs tested in this study were associated with late urinary toxicity in the univariate analysis.
This study identified age as the only variable being associated with late urinary toxicity. However, the small sample size and the candidate gene approach used in this study mean that further investigations are essential. Genome-wide association studies are emerging as the preferred approach for future radiogenomic studies to overcome the limitations from a candidate gene approach.
PubMed ID
24656733 View in PubMed
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Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the modern era: analysis of outcomes and toxicity from a single center in a nonendemic area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169646
Source
Cancer J. 2006 Mar-Apr;12(2):147-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Don Yee
John Hanson
Harold Lau
Jodi Siever
Stefan Gluck
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Cancer J. 2006 Mar-Apr;12(2):147-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Antineoplastic Agents - therapeutic use
Carboplatin - therapeutic use
Carcinoma - mortality - pathology - therapy
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Nutritional Support
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
We analyzed treatment outcomes for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a single institute.
From 1992 to 2002, 82 patients with nasopharyngeal cancer were treated. Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall and disease-free survival were calculated. The log-rank test was used to determine significant prognostic determinants of overall and disease-free survival.
Patients received one of three regimens: radiotherapy alone (n = 19), radiotherapy with concurrent carboplatin (n = 46), or radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin (n = 17). Fifty-seven percent of patients had their radiotherapy planned using fluoroscopy-based methods. Overall, 93.9% of patients received all prescribed radiotherapy. Response rate to treatment was 98.7%. Three-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates for all patients were 69.0% and 65%, respectively. Five patients had late grade 3-4 toxicities. There were no treatment-related deaths. Twenty-four percent of patients were hospitalized during treatment, and 72.6% lost
PubMed ID
16630406 View in PubMed
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