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Abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and associations with cardiometabolic risk in Inuit, Africans and Europeans: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304748
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 09 14; 10(9):e038071
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-14-2020
Author
Pernille Falberg Rønn
Gregers Stig Andersen
Torsten Lauritzen
Dirk Lund Christensen
Mette Aadahl
Bendix Carstensen
Niels Grarup
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Epidemiology, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark pernille.falberg.roenn@regionh.dk.
Source
BMJ Open. 2020 09 14; 10(9):e038071
Date
09-14-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Abdominal fat has been identified as a risk marker of cardiometabolic disease independent of overall adiposity. However, it is not clear whether there are ethnic disparities in this risk. We investigated the associations of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) with cardiometabolic risk factors in three ethnic diverse populations of Inuit, Africans and Europeans.
Cross-sectional pooled study.
Greenland, Kenya and Denmark.
A total of 5113 participants (2933 Inuit, 1397 Africans and 783 Europeans) from three studies in Greenland, Kenya and Denmark were included. Measurements included abdominal fat distribution assessed by ultrasound, oral glucose tolerance test, hepatic insulin resistance, blood pressure and lipids. The associations were analysed using multiple linear regressions.
Across ethnic group and gender, an increase in VAT of 1 SD was associated with higher levels of hepatic insulin resistance (ranging from 14% to 28%), triglycerides (8% to 16%) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, -1.0 to -0.05 mmol/L) independent of body mass index. VAT showed positive associations with most of the other cardiometabolic risk factors in Inuit and Europeans, but not in Africans. In contrast, SAT was mainly associated with the outcomes in Inuit and Africans. Of notice was that higher SAT was associated with higher HDL-C in African men (0.11?mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.18) and with lower HDL-C in Inuit (-0.07?mmol/L, 95% CI: -0.12 to -0.02), but not in European men (-0.02?mmol/L, 95% CI: -0.09 to 0.05). Generally weaker associations were observed for women. Furthermore, the absolute levels of several of the cardiometabolic outcomes differed between the ethnic groups.
VAT and SAT were associated with several of the cardiometabolic risk factors beyond overall adiposity. Some of these associations were specific to ethnicity, suggesting that ethnicity plays a role in the pathway from abdominal fat to selected cardiometabolic risk factors.
PubMed ID
32928857 View in PubMed
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The obesity-associated risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality is not lower in Inuit compared to Europeans: A cohort study of Greenlandic Inuit, Nunavik Inuit and Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290673
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2017 10; 265:207-214
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2017
Author
Pernille Falberg Rønn
Michel Lucas
Elhadji A Laouan Sidi
Maria Tvermosegaard
Gregers Stig Andersen
Torsten Lauritzen
Ulla Toft
Bendix Carstensen
Dirk Lund Christensen
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark; Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark. Electronic address: pernille.falberg.roenn@regionh.dk.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2017 10; 265:207-214
Date
10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body Weights and Measures
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Denmark
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Greenland
Humans
Incidence
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
Inuit populations have lower levels of cardiometabolic risk factors for the same level of body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) compared to Europeans in cross-sectional studies. We aimed to compare the longitudinal associations of anthropometric measures with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in Inuit and Europeans.
Using pooled data from three population-based studies in Canada, Greenland and Denmark, we conducted a cohort study of 10,033 adult participants (765 Nunavik Inuit, 2960 Greenlandic Inuit and 6308 Europeans). Anthropometric measures collected at baseline included: BMI, WC, waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR), waist-to-height-ratio (WHtR) and a body shape index (ABSI). Information on CVD and death was retrieved from national registers or medical files. Poisson regression analyses were used to calculate incidence rates for CVD and all-cause mortality.
During a median follow-up of 10.5 years, there were 642 CVD events and 594 deaths. Slightly higher absolute incidence rates of CVD for a given anthropometric measure were found in Nunavik Inuit compared with Greenlandic Inuit and the Europeans; however, no cohort interactions were observed. For all-cause mortality, all anthropometric measures were positively associated in the Europeans, but only ABSI in the two Inuit populations. In contrast, BMI and WC were inversely associated with mortality in the two Inuit populations.
Inuit and Europeans have different absolute incidences of CVD and all-cause mortality, but the trends in the associations with the anthropometric measures only differ for all-cause mortality. Previous findings of a lower obesity-associated cardiometabolic risk among Inuit were not confirmed.
PubMed ID
28917159 View in PubMed
Less detail

The obesity-associated risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality is not lower in Inuit compared to Europeans: A cohort study of Greenlandic Inuit, Nunavik Inuit and Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285810
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2017 Oct;265:207-214
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Pernille Falberg Rønn
Michel Lucas
Elhadji A Laouan Sidi
Maria Tvermosegaard
Gregers Stig Andersen
Torsten Lauritzen
Ulla Toft
Bendix Carstensen
Dirk Lund Christensen
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2017 Oct;265:207-214
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Inuit populations have lower levels of cardiometabolic risk factors for the same level of body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) compared to Europeans in cross-sectional studies. We aimed to compare the longitudinal associations of anthropometric measures with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in Inuit and Europeans.
Using pooled data from three population-based studies in Canada, Greenland and Denmark, we conducted a cohort study of 10,033 adult participants (765 Nunavik Inuit, 2960 Greenlandic Inuit and 6308 Europeans). Anthropometric measures collected at baseline included: BMI, WC, waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR), waist-to-height-ratio (WHtR) and a body shape index (ABSI). Information on CVD and death was retrieved from national registers or medical files. Poisson regression analyses were used to calculate incidence rates for CVD and all-cause mortality.
During a median follow-up of 10.5 years, there were 642 CVD events and 594 deaths. Slightly higher absolute incidence rates of CVD for a given anthropometric measure were found in Nunavik Inuit compared with Greenlandic Inuit and the Europeans; however, no cohort interactions were observed. For all-cause mortality, all anthropometric measures were positively associated in the Europeans, but only ABSI in the two Inuit populations. In contrast, BMI and WC were inversely associated with mortality in the two Inuit populations.
Inuit and Europeans have different absolute incidences of CVD and all-cause mortality, but the trends in the associations with the anthropometric measures only differ for all-cause mortality. Previous findings of a lower obesity-associated cardiometabolic risk among Inuit were not confirmed.
PubMed ID
28917159 View in PubMed
Less detail