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The 2012 SAGE wait times program: Survey of Access to GastroEnterology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115731
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Desmond Leddin
David Armstrong
Mark Borgaonkar
Ronald J Bridges
Carlo A Fallone
Jennifer J Telford
Ying Chen
Palma Colacino
Paul Sinclair
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Colonoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroenterology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Periodically surveying wait times for specialist health services in Canada captures current data and enables comparisons with previous surveys to identify changes over time.
During one week in April 2012, Canadian gastroenterologists were asked to complete a questionnaire (online or by fax) recording demographics, reason for referral, and dates of referral and specialist visits for at least 10 consecutive new patients (five consultations and five procedures) who had not been seen previously for the same indication. Wait times were determined for 18 indications and compared with those from similar surveys conducted in 2008 and 2005.
Data regarding adult patients were provided by 173 gastroenterologists for 1374 consultations, 540 procedures and 293 same-day consultations and procedures. Nationally, the median wait times were 92 days (95% CI 85 days to 100 days) from referral to consultation, 55 days (95% CI 50 days to 61 days) from consultation to procedure and 155 days (95% CI 142 days to 175 days) (total) from referral to procedure. Overall, wait times were longer in 2012 than in 2005 (P
Notes
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Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):20-520186352
PubMed ID
23472243 View in PubMed
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Survey of access to gastroenterology in Canada: the SAGE wait times program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145206
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):20-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Desmond Leddin
Ronald J Bridges
David G Morgan
Carlo Fallone
Craig Render
Victor Plourde
Jim Gray
Connie Switzer
Jim McHattie
Harminder Singh
Eric Walli
Iain Murray
Anthony Nestel
Paul Sinclair
Ying Chen
E Jan Irvine
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. desmond.leddin@dal.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):20-5
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Digestive System Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Gastroenterology
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Assessment of current wait times for specialist health services in Canada is a key method that can assist government and health care providers to plan wisely for future health needs. These data are not readily available. A method to capture wait time data at the time of consultation or procedure has been developed, which should be applicable to other specialist groups and also allows for assessment of wait time trends over intervals of years.
In November 2008, gastroenterologists across Canada were asked to complete a questionnaire (online or by fax) that included personal demographics and data from one week on at least five consecutive new consultations and five consecutive procedure patients who had not previously undergone a procedure for the same indication. Wait times were collected for 18 primary indications and results were then compared with similar survey data collected in 2005.
The longest wait times observed were for screening colonoscopy (201 days) and surveillance of previous colon cancer or polyps (272 days). The shortest wait times were for cancer-likely based on imaging or physical examination (82 days), severe or rapidly progressing dysphagia or odynophagia (83 days), documented iron deficiency anemia (90 days) and dyspepsia with alarm symptoms (99 days). Compared with 2005 data, total wait times in 2008 were lengthened overall (127 days versus 155 days; P
Notes
Cites: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2004 Feb;2(2):178-8215017624
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;20(6):411-2316779459
Cites: Colorectal Dis. 2006 Jul;8(6):480-316784466
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):161-718299735
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;102(3):478-8117335442
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):155-6018299734
Cites: Colorectal Dis. 2007 Mar;9(3):203-617298616
PubMed ID
20186352 View in PubMed
Less detail