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Assessment of vocal fold mobility before and after cardiothoracic surgery in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133577
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Jun;137(6):571-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Luthiana F Carpes
Frederick K Kozak
Jacques G Leblanc
Andrew I Campbell
Derek G Human
Marcela Fandino
Jeffrey P Ludemann
J Paul Moxham
Humberto Fiori
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Jun;137(6):571-5
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aorta, Thoracic - surgery
British Columbia
Cautery
Child, Preschool
Ductus Arteriosus, Patent - surgery
Female
Heart Arrest, Induced
Humans
Infant
Laryngoscopy
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Pulmonary Artery - surgery
Thoracic Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Vocal Cord Paralysis - etiology
Abstract
To assess the incidence of vocal fold immobility (VFI) after cardiothoracic surgery in children and to determine the factors potentially associated with this outcome.
Flexible laryngoscopy to assess vocal fold mobility was performed before surgery and within 72 hours after extubation in 100 pediatric patients who underwent cardiothoracic procedures. The 2 operating surgeons recorded the surgical technique and their impression of possible injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The presence of laryngeal symptoms, such as stridor, hoarseness, and strength of cry, after extubation was documented.
Of 100 children included in this study, 8 had VFI after surgery. Univariate analyses showed that these 8 patients were younger and weighed less than the patients with normal vocal fold movement. Monopolar cautery was used in all patients with VFI. On univariate analysis, factors statistically significantly associated with VFI were circulatory arrest and dissection or ligation of the patent ductus arteriosus, left pulmonary artery, right pulmonary artery, or descending aorta. However, multivariate analyses failed to show these associations.
The incidence of VFI after cardiothoracic surgery in our population of children was 8.0% (8 of 100). Of several factors found to be potentially associated with VFI on univariate analysis, none were significant on multivariate analysis. This may be a result of the few patients with VFI. A larger multicenter prospective study would be needed to definitively identify factors associated with the outcome of VFI.
PubMed ID
21690509 View in PubMed
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Economic evaluation of palivizumab in children with congenital heart disease: a Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133797
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;27(4):523.e11-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kevin C Harris
Aslam H Anis
Marsha C Crosby
Laurie M Cender
James E Potts
Derek G Human
Author Affiliation
Children's Heart Centre, Division of Cardiology, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. kharris2@cw.bc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;27(4):523.e11-5
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
British Columbia
Bronchiolitis - prevention & control - virology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - drug therapy
Humans
Infant
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - prevention & control - virology
Abstract
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of bronchiolitis in infants. In children with congenital heart disease (CHD), it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Palivizumab is a monoclonal antibody that reduces the number of RSV-associated hospitalizations in children with CHD. We sought to assess cost savings and cost-effectiveness of palivizumab in children
PubMed ID
21664100 View in PubMed
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Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106003
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1535-52
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Paul F Kantor
Jane Lougheed
Adrian Dancea
Michael McGillion
Nicole Barbosa
Carol Chan
Rejane Dillenburg
Joseph Atallah
Holger Buchholz
Catherine Chant-Gambacort
Jennifer Conway
Letizia Gardin
Kristen George
Steven Greenway
Derek G Human
Aamir Jeewa
Jack F Price
Robert D Ross
S Lucy Roche
Lindsay Ryerson
Reeni Soni
Judith Wilson
Kenny Wong
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Stollery Children's Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: paul.kantor@albertahealthservices.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1535-52
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Algorithms
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia - complications - diagnosis
Biological Markers - blood
Canada
Cardiomyopathies - complications - diagnosis
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Catecholamines - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - etiology - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Differential
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Evidence-Based Medicine
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - therapy
Heart Failure - classification - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology
Humans
Infant
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Myocarditis - complications - diagnosis
Myocardium - pathology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Vasodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Vasopressins - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
Pediatric heart failure (HF) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. This article presents guidelines for the recognition, diagnosis, and early medical management of HF in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The guidelines are intended to assist practitioners in office-based or emergency room practice, who encounter children with undiagnosed heart disease and symptoms of possible HF, rather than those who have already received surgical palliation. The guidelines have been developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and are accompanied by practical Recommendations for their application in the clinical setting, supplemented by online material. This work does not include Recommendations for advanced management involving ventricular assist devices, or other device therapies.
PubMed ID
24267800 View in PubMed
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Surgical management of valvular heart disease 2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168622
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Oct;20 Suppl E:7E-120E
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
W R Eric Jamieson
Paul C Cartier
Michael Allard
Christine Boutin
Ian G Burwash
Jagdish Butany
Benoit de Varennes
Dario Del Rizzo
Jean Gaston Dumesnil
George Honos
Christine Houde
Bradley I Munt
Nancy Poirier
Ivan M Rebeyka
David B Ross
Samuel C Siu
William G Williams
Ivan M REbeyka
Tirone E David
John D Dyck
Christopher M S Feindel
Guy J Fradet
Derek G Human
Michel D Lemieux
Alan H Menkis
Hugh E Scully
Alexander G G Turpie
David H Adams
Alain Berrebi
John Chambers
Kwan-Leung Chang
Lawrence H Cohn
Carlos M G Duran
Ronald C Elkins
Robert Freedman
Hans A Huysman
John Jue
Patrick Perier
Harry Rakowski
Hartzell V Schaff
Fred A Schoen
Pravin Shah
Christopher R Thompson
Carol Warnes
Stephen Westaby
Magdi H Yacoub
Author Affiliation
St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. wrej@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Oct;20 Suppl E:7E-120E
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aortic Valve Insufficiency - surgery
Aortic Valve Stenosis - surgery
Canada
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - epidemiology - surgery
Catheterization
Child
Comorbidity
Decision Making
Disease Progression
Ebstein Anomaly - surgery
Echocardiography, Transesophageal
Female
Heart Valve Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mitral Valve Stenosis - physiopathology - surgery
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - surgery
Prognosis
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis-Related Infections
Pulmonary Valve Stenosis - surgery
Registries
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - etiology
PubMed ID
16804571 View in PubMed
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Use of an implantable loop recorder in the evaluation of children with congenital heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191612
Source
Am Heart J. 2002 Feb;143(2):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Shubhayan Sanatani
Alejandro Peirone
Christine Chiu
Derek G Human
Gil J Gross
Robert M Hamilton
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children and The University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am Heart J. 2002 Feb;143(2):366-72
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Electrodes, Implanted
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - physiopathology
Humans
Long QT Syndrome - physiopathology
Male
Retrospective Studies
Syncope - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
A recently developed implantable loop recorder (ILR) has been used in adult patients whose syncope remains unexplained in spite of extensive investigations. Syncope in the patient with congenital heart disease presents a diagnostic challenge. We applied this technology to a cohort of pediatric patients.
We reviewed our experience with an ILR in patients with congenital heart disease with syncope or palpitations after conventional investigations failed to identify a cause for the symptoms.
ILRs were implanted in 4 patients with congenital heart disease at 2 centers for investigation of syncope (n = 2), near-syncope (n = 1), and palpitations (n = 1). Implantations were performed at a mean age of 5.9 +/- 0.9 years (4.2 to 7.6 years) and a mean weight of 26.7 +/- 6.6 kg (15.7 to 42.5 kg) with patients under general anesthesia, with no complications. All patients experienced typical symptoms and activated the device appropriately at a median of 86 days (46 to 102) after implantation. Each patient had good-quality data that allowed interpretation of the rhythm. In 2 of 4 cases, a likely cause for the symptoms was identified, with exclusion of more malignant arrhythmic diagnoses in all patients. Escalation of therapy was avoidable in all patients on the basis of the data recorded by the ILR.
Recently developed loop recorder technology can be implanted in the young child without difficulty. The ILR proved to be very useful for excluding malignant arrhythmias as a cause of symptoms in these patients at high risk.
PubMed ID
11835044 View in PubMed
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