Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Is "treat your child normally" helpful advice for parents of survivors of treatment of hypoplastic left heart syndrome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152171
Source
Cardiol Young. 2009 Apr;19(2):135-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Gwen R Rempel
Margaret J Harrison
Deanna L Williamson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. gwen.rempel@ualberta.ca
Source
Cardiol Young. 2009 Apr;19(2):135-44
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome - mortality - surgery
Infant
Informed Consent - ethics - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - education
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
Developing technology affords children with complex congenitally malformed hearts a chance for survival. Parents gratefully pursue life-saving options on behalf of their children, despite the risks to the life of their child, and uncertainty about outcomes. Little is known about how mothers and fathers experience parenting a child whose new state as a survivor may include less than optimal developmental sequels.
Our study involved multiple interactive interviews with 9 mothers and 7 fathers of infants and preschool children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome who had survived the Norwood surgical approach. Qualitative methodology included grounded theory methods of simultaneous collection and analysis of data, and we used open and selective coding of transcribed interviews.
Parents used normalization in the context of uncertainty regarding the ongoing survival of their child. Parents described their underweight children as being on their own growth curve, and viewed their developmental progress, however delayed, as reason for celebration, as they had been prepared for their child to die.
There is growing evidence that children with congenitally malformed hearts who require surgical intervention during the first year of life may experience developmental delay. The use of normalization by their parents may be effective in decreasing their worry regarding the uncertain future faced by their child, but may negatively affect the developmental progress of the child if they do not seek resources to assist development. Advice from paediatric specialists for parents to view their children as normal needs to be balanced with assistance for parents to access services to support optimal growth and development of their child.
Notes
Comment In: Cardiol Young. 2009 Apr;19(2):131-419272205
PubMed ID
19272201 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low-income Canadians' experiences with health-related services: implications for health care reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174169
Source
Health Policy. 2006 Mar;76(1):106-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Deanna L Williamson
Miriam J Stewart
Karen Hayward
Nicole Letourneau
Edward Makwarimba
Jeff Masuda
Kim Raine
Linda Reutter
Irving Rootman
Douglas Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta, 302 Human Ecology Building, Edmonton, Alta., Canada T6G 2N1. deanna.williamson@ualberta.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2006 Mar;76(1):106-21
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Canada
Female
Health Care Reform
Health services
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
National Health Programs
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Poverty
Abstract
This study investigated the use of health-related services by low-income Canadians living in two large cities, Edmonton and Toronto. Interview data collected from low-income people, service providers and managers, advocacy group representatives, and senior-level public servants were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Findings indicate that, in addition to health care policies and programs, a broad range of policies, programs, and services relating to income security, recreation, and housing influence the ability of low-income Canadians to attain, maintain, and enhance their health. Furthermore, the manner in which health-related services are delivered plays a key role in low-income people's service-use decisions. We conclude the paper with a discussion of the health and social policy implications of the findings, which are particularly relevant within the context of recent health care reform discussions in Canada.
PubMed ID
15978694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Supported-employment program processes and outcomes: experiences of people with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160761
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 2007 Sep-Oct;61(5):543-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
K W David Liu
Vivien Hollis
Sharon Warren
Deanna L Williamson
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health, Grey Nuns Community Hospital, Caritas Health Group, 1100 Youville Drive West, Edmonton, Alberta T6L 5X8, Canada. dliu@cha.ab.ca
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 2007 Sep-Oct;61(5):543-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Employment, Supported
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Job Application
Male
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services
Occupational therapy
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Psychological Theory
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Schizophrenia - rehabilitation
Self Efficacy
Vocational Guidance
Abstract
This qualitative study explored participants' experiences of a supported-employment program. Understanding participants' opinions of a supported-employment program may provide insights into what processes and outcomes are meaningful and important for participants and may enable an evaluation of such processes and outcomes for their congruence with occupational therapy practice.
Supported-employment program participants with schizophrenia (N= 7) were recruited from an agency and interviewed individually with open-ended questions. Data were analyzed using a grounded-theory approach.
We developed a tentative grounded theory with three themes of supported-employment program outcomes: (a) removing barriers to job seeking, (b) improving psychological well-being, and (c) participating in work.
Supported-employment program participants can achieve meaningful personal outcomes even though they do not obtain competitive employment. These programs removed barriers to job seeking, but personal readiness and efforts in job seeking contributed most to obtaining employment.
PubMed ID
17944292 View in PubMed
Less detail

Welfare reforms and the cognitive development of young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176400
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Deanna L Williamson
Fiona J Salkie
Nicole Letourneau
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, 302 Human Ecology Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2N1. deanna.williamson@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96(1):13-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment
Family Characteristics
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Least-Squares Analysis
Parents - psychology
Poverty
Public Assistance - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
To investigate whether the cognitive development of young children in poverty is affected by activities of their primary caregiver and by household income source, which are two components of family poverty experience that have been affected by recent welfare reforms.
Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships that caregiver activity, household income source, and family characteristics (family income adequacy, caregiver depressive symptoms, caregiver education) have with the cognitive development of 59 impoverished children less than three years old.
Of the three poverty experience variables included in the multivariate analysis, only employment as the exclusive source of household income had an independent relationship (positive) with children's cognitive development. Two of the family characteristics, income adequacy and caregiver education, also were associated with the children's cognitive score, and they were both better relative predictors than the employment-only income source variable. Income adequacy was positively associated and caregiver education was negatively associated with children's cognitive development.
Although recent welfare reforms, in combination with economic growth and declining unemployment, have changed the poverty experience of young families by increasing the proportion that secure at least part of their income from employment, our study provides preliminary evidence that these reforms have made little difference for most young impoverished children. Instead, our findings suggest that the cognitive development of young children is influenced as much by the actual amount of household income as by their parents' activity and source of income.
PubMed ID
15682687 View in PubMed
Less detail