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Percutaneous suture edge-to-edge repair of the mitral valve.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149884
Source
EuroIntervention. 2009 May;5(1):86-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
John G Webb
Francesco Maisano
Alec Vahanian
Brad Munt
Tasneem Z Naqvi
Raoul Bonan
David Zarbatany
Maurice Buchbinder
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. webb@providencehealth.bc.ca
Source
EuroIntervention. 2009 May;5(1):86-9
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
California
Canada
Cardiac Catheterization
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Echocardiography, Transesophageal
Europe
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mitral Valve Insufficiency - diagnosis - surgery
Radiography, Interventional
Severity of Illness Index
Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive
Suture Techniques
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To describe a new approach to percutaneous mitral valve repair and an illustrative first-in-man experience, we introduce a suture mediated "double orifice", "edge-to-edge" procedure which can be an effective surgical therapy for mitral regurgitation (MR) in selected patient.
We describe a novel percutaneous approach to double orifice mitral repair utilising an intra-cardiac suture based system. The procedure was performed in 15 patients in four international centres. Endovascular suture based double orifice mitral repair was feasible with an acute reduction in the severity of MR by > or = 1 grade in nine of 15 patients. At 30 days improvement in MR appeared durable in six patients. Clinical utility was limited by technical difficulties, the inadequacies of current imaging modalities and suture dehiscence.
Percutaneous endovascular suture based cardiac repair is feasible. However, in utilising the current device clinical benefit was limited and the repair not durable. In the future, similar endovascular approaches may enable more complex cardiac repair.
PubMed ID
19577987 View in PubMed
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