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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Computer-enhanced surgical systems ("robotic surgery").

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190397
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2002 Feb;(29):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Thea Heffner
David Hailey
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2002 Feb;(29):1-4
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Costs and Cost Analysis
Device Approval
Diffusion of Innovation
Forecasting
Humans
Robotics - economics - instrumentation - trends
Surgery, Computer-Assisted - economics - instrumentation - trends
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
Computer-linked surgical systems allow surgeons to perform procedures without coming into contact with the patient. Indications for these robotic surgery systems are expanding. This technology offers potential advantages through enabling more precise surgery, which may lead to shorter patient recovery times, fewer complications and improved patient outcomes. Limited studies indicate the promise of these systems, which appear to be safe, but their efficacy is not fully established. In some procedures, the advantages they offer may also be achieved by newer non-computer assisted techniques. Capital costs are high and cost-effectiveness has not been demonstrated. Diffusion of these systems can be expected to continue, but their place in surgical practice is not yet clear. They are most likely to be of value for centres undertaking specialized surgical services.
PubMed ID
11985364 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Respir J. 2007 Mar;14(2):81-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Sandor J Demeter
Philip Jacobs
Chester Chmielowiec
Wayne Logus
David Hailey
Konrad Fassbender
Alexander McEwan
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology and Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. sdemeter@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2007 Mar;14(2):81-6
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Costs and Cost Analysis
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Abstract
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. In addition, lung cancer has a significant economic impact on society.
To present an economic analysis of the actual care costs of lung cancer which will allow comparison with, and verification of, cost estimates that were developed through modelling and opinion.
A chart review was conducted of incident cases (circa 1998) of primary bronchogenic lung cancer. Cases were censored at two years from the date of diagnosis. Relevant clinical and health utilization data were collected. Health utilization data included hospital and institutional outpatient (ie, ambulatory clinic) costs. Cost estimates were derived for over 200 specific health services. The present analysis was performed from the economic perspective of the health care institution.
A total of 13,389 health service events were captured with an estimated total cost of $8.4 million. Laboratory tests, diagnostic imaging and ambulatory visits constituted 86% of the service events while patient admissions and therapy constituted 76% of the costs. The vast majority of overall costs occurred just before, or within, three months of diagnosis. The median nonsmall cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer case costs were $10,928 (range $9,234 to $11,047) and $15,350 (range $13,033 to $21,436), respectively.
The results agree with the literature that the majority of lung cancer case costs are realized around the date of diagnosis (ie, early phase). The present study illustrates Canadian health care system lung cancer case costs based on actual care received versus hypothetical care algorithms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17372634 View in PubMed
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The descriptive epidemiology of primary lung cancer in an Alberta cohort with a multivariate analysis of survival to two years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182349
Source
Can Respir J. 2003 Nov-Dec;10(8):435-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sandor J Demeter
Chester Chmielowiec
Wayne Logus
Pauline Benkovska-Angelova
Philip Jacobs
David Hailey
Alexander McEwan
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. sdemeter@shaw.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2003 Nov-Dec;10(8):435-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - mortality
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Lung cancer contributes significantly to cancer morbidity and mortality. Although case fatality rates have not changed significantly over the past few decades, there have been advances in the diagnosis, staging and management of lung cancer.
To describe the epidemiology of primary lung cancer in an Alberta cohort with an analysis of factors contributing to survival to two years.
Six hundred eleven Albertans diagnosed with primary lung cancer in 1998 were identified through the Alberta Cancer Registry. Through a chart review, demographic and clinical data were collected for a period of up to two years from the date of diagnosis.
The mean age at diagnosis was 66.5 years. The majority of cases (92%) were smokers. Adenocarcinoma, followed by squamous cell carcinoma, were the most frequent nonsmall cell lung cancer histologies. Adenocarcinoma was more frequent in women, and squamous cell carcinoma was more frequent in men. The overall two- year survival rates for nonsmall cell, small cell and other lung cancers were 24%, 10% and 13%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage, thoracic surgery and chemotherapy were significantly associated with survival to two years in nonsmall cell carcinoma; only stage and chemotherapy were significant in small cell carcinoma.
This study provides a Canadian epidemiological perspective, which generally concurs with the North American literature. Continued monitoring of the epidemiology of lung cancer is essential to evaluate the impact of advances in the diagnosis, staging and management of lung cancer. Further clinical and economic analysis, based on data collected on this cohort, is planned.
PubMed ID
14679408 View in PubMed
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Economic analysis of reprocessing single-use medical devices: a systematic literature review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157308
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;29(4):297-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Philip Jacobs
Julie Polisena
David Hailey
Susan Lafferty
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. pjacobs@ihe.ca
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2008 Apr;29(4):297-301
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross Infection - transmission
Disposable Equipment - economics - standards
Equipment Reuse - economics
Health Care Costs
Humans
Infection Control - economics
Sterilization - economics
Abstract
Although an increasing number of medical devices are labeled "for single use only," cleaning and reuse of single-use medical devices continues, because of the economic incentive. We conducted a survey of the economic literature to obtain the current evidence available and to assess the costs and benefits of reusing single-use medical devices.
A comprehensive literature search was carried out to identify articles that compared single use and reuse of single-use medical devices and that met specific scientific criteria, including evaluation of economic outcomes. Each selected article was independently reviewed by 2 reviewers to extract cost and clinical outcome data and to assess the quality of the study.
Nine published articles met the selection criteria. The savings were about 49% of the direct cost. These savings would be offset by adverse-event costs, but none were detected. However, quality of the studies was generally poor.
There is little available evidence of quality in the published literature to assess the practice of reuse of single-use medical devices. Moreover, data on clinical outcomes are missing and, where available, cannot be attributed specifically to the reuse of single-use medical devices.
PubMed ID
18462140 View in PubMed
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Endoscope-based treatments for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181044
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2004 Mar;(54):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
David Hailey
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2004 Mar;(54):1-4
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Device Approval
Diffusion of Innovation
Endoscopes, Gastrointestinal
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal - adverse effects - economics
Gastroesophageal Reflux - therapy
Humans
Treatment Outcome
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
Endoscope-based products for the treatment of more severe forms of gastroesophageal reflux disease provide an alternative to the use of drugs or surgery. Results from case series have shown that selected patients benefit through relief of symptoms and reduction of medication. Reported adverse effects appear to be minor. Efficacy has been mostly assessed over short periods and there is little information on comparison with other treatments. Procedural skills and appropriate training in their use are required. These technologies are promising, but their place in health care is not established.
PubMed ID
15027474 View in PubMed
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The evolution of a successful telemedicine mental health service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186104
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8 Suppl 3:S3:24-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
David Hailey
Tim Bulger
Sharlene Stayberg
Douglas Urness
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta and Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Edmonton, Canada. dhailey@ozemail.com.au
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8 Suppl 3:S3:24-6
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Psychiatry - organization & administration
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Development of telemedicine mental health services in Alberta evolved via a pilot project, the delivery of routine services to a small group of centres and subsequent expansion to a province-wide programme. Success of the service was linked to support for telehealth by the provincial government and consultation between the Alberta Mental Health Board (AMHB) and local stakeholders. Assessments by the AMHB have shown that telepsychiatry is acceptable and sustainable at a realistic cost. However, there are few measures of clinical effectiveness available and none of cost-effectiveness. A detailed economic evaluation of the telemedicine mental health network would now be a major task. The expansion of telemedicine mental health services has increased the expectations of health-care decision makers. In addition, the complexity of the network has increased and new initiatives, such as the use of telepsychology, have been introduced. Management of this successful telehealth programme continues to be time consuming and challenging.
PubMed ID
12661612 View in PubMed
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Extracorporeal immunoadsorption treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190482
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2002 Jan;(28):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
David Hailey
Leigh-Ann Topfer
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2002 Jan;(28):1-4
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - therapy
Blood Component Removal - adverse effects - economics
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Device Approval
Europe
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Immunosorbent Techniques
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Staphylococcal Protein A - therapeutic use
Abstract
Immunoadsorption treatment is a non-drug therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. The treatment is based on filtering the patient's plasma through a column containing staphylococcal protein A. The treatment is effective in alleviating the symptoms of severe rheumatoid arthritis in some patients. Data on long-term outcomes are not available. The mechanism of action of this treatment is unclear. Most adverse effects are associated with the apheresis procedure. The cost per 12 week course of treatment is likely to be more than C $20,000. The cost-effectiveness of the technology is not yet established.
PubMed ID
11968222 View in PubMed
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Hand-carried ultrasound units for point-of-care cardiac examinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188089
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2002 Oct;(41):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
David Hailey
Leigh-Ann Topfer
Author Affiliation
Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment, Canada.
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2002 Oct;(41):1-4
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Device Approval
Echocardiography - adverse effects - economics - methods
Heart Diseases - ultrasonography
Humans
Point-of-Care Systems
United States
Abstract
Several hand-carried ultrasound units have been developed for point-of-care cardiac examination. Limited small comparative studies indicate that these devices are more accurate than physical examination. Though their diagnostic performance is generally inferior to standard echocardiography, there appears to be close agreement for some conditions. Operator training in the performance and interpretation of tests using these ultrasound devices is vitally important. The place of these devices in health care will depend on their compatibility with individual practice, their cost, reimbursement decisions and further technical developments.
PubMed ID
12389592 View in PubMed
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Health technology assessment, research, and implementation within a health region in Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183731
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2003;19(3):513-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Robert C Lee
Deborah Marshall
Cam Waddell
David Hailey
Don Juzwishin
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary Health Technology Implementation Unit, Foothills Medical Centre, Alberta, Canada. rclee@ucalgary.ca
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2003;19(3):513-20
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Decision Making, Organizational
Government Agencies
Health Plan Implementation
Health Priorities
Health Services Research
Humans
Policy Making
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
To determine the need for and implement health technology assessment (HTA) to inform decision making and policy within a regional health care system in Calgary (Alberta, Canada).
Published literature and organizational materials for the Calgary Health Region (CHR) and HTA units worldwide were reviewed. Key individuals within the provincial health ministry (Alberta Health and Wellness), CHR, the University of Calgary (U of C), funding agencies, and HTA organizations were consulted in a structured fashion. A structure for a regional HTA program was developed, taking into account relationships between these organizations.
A locally focused HTA and implementation unit was deemed desirable. The Calgary Health Technology Implementation Unit (CaHTIU) was established. The CaHTIU was designed to efficiently integrate with CHR planning as well as undertake independent research activities. HTA activities focus primarily on CHR needs and are managed by a Health Technology Advisory Committee (HTAC) that consists of CHR management and other key individuals. Working groups contribute to and coordinate HTAs and implementation under the leadership of the unit Director, and include content as well as management individuals. The unit cooperates where appropriate with extant Canadian HTA organizations.
The Calgary HTA unit is unique in Canada, because it functions within a regional health care system as well as a research institution. Advantages include a local focus in terms of applied HTAs, a systematic process for implementation of recommendations, and a collaborative atmosphere for research within the U of C.
PubMed ID
12962337 View in PubMed
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Limitations in the routine use of telepsychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153209
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2009;15(1):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
David Hailey
Arto Ohinmaa
Risto Roine
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. dhailey@ozemail.com.au
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2009;15(1):28-31
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Databases, Bibliographic
Finland
Humans
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Telemedicine - utilization
Videoconferencing - utilization
Abstract
Telepsychiatry is well established in many countries, but there is still little information about its use in routine health care. We reviewed the literature for information on the use of telepsychiatry in mental health services. From 1033 publications identified in the literature search and through references from a separate project, 16 studies or descriptions of the routine use of telepsychiatry services were selected for further review. Eleven of these articles dealt primarily with videoconferencing and five with telephone- based services. Clinical use of videoconferencing in the programmes described by the reviewed papers was modest, with an average of 16 consultations per month. Three of the telephone-based services had large numbers of clients. The papers we reviewed gave limited consideration to the healthcare systems in which telepsychiatry was provided and to the use of conventional mental health services. Telepsychiatry appears to still be a niche technology in many health systems. A lack of champions for the technology and reimbursement problems may contribute to the limited use of this area of telemedicine.
PubMed ID
19139217 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.