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Exploring childhood immunization uptake with First Nations mothers in north-western Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187080
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jan;41(1):63-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Marie Tarrant
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Studies, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. tarrantm@hkucc.hku.hk
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2003 Jan;41(1):63-72
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Fear
Female
Humans
Immunization - psychology - utilization
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Childhood immunization is an important component of preventive health care for young children. Successful control of vaccine-preventable diseases depends on high levels of immunization coverage. Immunization statistics show that on-reserve First Nations (Native Indian) children have lower vaccination coverage than children in the general Canadian population. There has been little research, however, conducted with First Nations populations on this topic.
This study explored First Nations parents' beliefs about childhood immunizations and examined factors influencing immunization uptake.
This study used a qualitative descriptive design to explore the issue of childhood immunization uptake. Twenty-eight mothers from two First Nations communities in north-western Ontario, Canada, were interviewed about their perceptions of childhood immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases. The interviews were transcribed and content analysis was used to examine the data.
Data analysis revealed the following six themes: (1) the fear of disease; (2) the efficacy of immunizations; (3) the immunization experience; (4) the consequences of immunization; (5) interactions with health professionals; and (6) barriers to immunizations. Participants were motivated to seek immunizations for their children by a fear of vaccine preventable diseases. A small proportion of mothers, however, questioned the effectiveness of vaccines in preventing disease. Traumatic immunization experiences, vaccine side-effects and sequelae, negative interactions with health professionals, and barriers such as time constraints and childhood illnesses all served as deterrents to immunization.
The research outcomes highlight the varied beliefs of First Nations parents about childhood immunizations and the numerous factors that both positively and negatively influence immunization uptake. Further research is needed to explore the issue of childhood immunizations in First Nations communities and to determine strategies to improve uptake.
PubMed ID
12519289 View in PubMed
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Indigenous people's health and health-care equity: seven years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121597
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
David Gregory
Jean Harrowing
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):15-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Nursing Research - trends
Health Services, Indigenous - trends
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Transcultural Nursing - trends
PubMed ID
22894004 View in PubMed
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Community health clinical education in Canada: part 2--developing competencies to address social justice, equity, and the social determinants of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152591
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Benita E Cohen
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba. benita cohen@umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article2
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - methods
Educational Measurement
Female
Focus Groups
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Professional Competence
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Recently, several Canadian professional nursing associations have highlighted the expectations that community health nurses (CHNs) should address the social determinants of health and promote social justice and equity. These developments have important implications for (pre-licensure) CHN clinical education. This article reports the findings of a qualitative descriptive study that explored how baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada address the development of competencies related to social justice, equity, and the social determinants of health in their community health clinical courses. Focus group interviews were held with community health clinical course leaders in selected Canadian baccalaureate nursing programs. The findings foster understanding of key enablers and challenges when providing students with clinical opportunities to develop the CHN role related to social injustice, inequity, and the social determinants of health. The findings may also have implications for nursing programs internationally that are addressing these concepts in their community health clinical courses.
PubMed ID
19222394 View in PubMed
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Community health clinical education in Canada: part 1--"state of the art".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152592
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Benita E Cohen
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba. benita cohen@umanitoba.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article1
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - methods
Educational Measurement
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Problem-Based Learning
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Abstract
This paper presents the findings of a survey of community health clinical education in twenty-four Canadian pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs. A qualitative research design was used, involving a content analysis of Canadian course syllabi and supporting documents for community health courses. This study afforded a cross-sectional understanding of the "state of the art" of community health clinical education in Canadian schools of nursing. Clinical course conceptual approaches, course objectives, types of clinical sites, format and number of clinical hours, and methods of student evaluation are identified. The findings suggest the need for a national dialogue or consensus building exercise regarding curriculum content for community health nursing. Informing this dialogue are several strengths including the current focus on community health (as opposed to community-based) nursing education, and a solid socio-environmental perspective informing clinical learning and practice. The national data set generated by this study may have relevance to nursing programs globally.
PubMed ID
19222393 View in PubMed
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How different can you be and still survive? Homogeneity and difference in clinical nursing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169528
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2004;1:Article2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Barbara L Paterson
Margaret Osborne
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia. bpaterso@unb.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2004;1:Article2
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Canada
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing
Humans
Social Conditions
Students, Nursing
Abstract
The article focuses on a component of a three-year institutional ethnography regarding the construction of cultural diversity in clinical education. Students in two Canadian schools of nursing described being a nursing student as bounded by unwritten and largely invisible expectations of homogeneity in the context of a predominant discourse of equality and cultural sensitivity. At the same time, they witnessed many incidents, both personally and those directed toward other individuals of the same culture, of clinical teachers problematizing difference and centering on difference as less than the expected norm. This complex and often contradictory experience of difference and homogeneity contributed to their construction of cultural diversity as a problem. The authors provide examples of how the perception of being different affected some students' learning in the clinical setting and their interactions with clinical teachers. They will illustrate that this occurred in the context of macro influences that shaped how both teachers and students experienced and perceived cultural diversity. The article concludes with a challenge to nurse educators to deconstruct their beliefs and assumptions about inclusivity in nursing education.
PubMed ID
16646885 View in PubMed
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Home care for older couples: "it feels like a security blanket . . .".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160582
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Nov;17(9):1245-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Ruth-Ann Soodeen
David Gregory
John B Bond
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Nov;17(9):1245-55
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Continuity of Patient Care
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Home Nursing - psychology
Homemaker Services - standards
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Professional-Family Relations
Professional-Patient Relations
Respite Care - psychology
Safety
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Trust - psychology
Abstract
In this article, the authors explore the home care experience as described by older physically impaired individuals and their caregiving spouses. Separate face-to-face semistructured interviews were carried out with each spouse from nine couples. Analysis of the interview data revealed four themes. For care receivers the themes were Independence and Developing a Trusting Relationship With Home Care Workers. Relief and Continuity were voiced by the caregiving spouses. The authors show how these themes relate to the participants' sense of security, which emerged as a key underlying concept in the home care experience. This study adds to the home care and caregiving literature as it expands our understanding of the relationship between formal and informal caregiving, highlights issues and concerns older couples face as they receive home-based care, and includes both older spouse caregivers and their direct-care recipients.
PubMed ID
17968041 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Case study: on the leading edge of new curricula concepts: systems and safety in nursing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167033
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2006 Sep;19(3):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Diana Davidson Dick
Lorna Weisbrod
David Gregory
Netha Dyck
Kim Neudorf
Author Affiliation
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology. diana.davidsondick@siast.sk.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2006 Sep;19(3):34-42
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Forecasting
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Medical Errors - nursing - prevention & control
Nursing Education Research
Organizational Innovation
Program Development
Safety Management - organization & administration
Saskatchewan
Systems Analysis
Abstract
The Nursing Division of the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) first included systems and patient safety as a priority in its institutional business and strategic plan in 2003. Three interrelated leading-edge, two-year projects (2004-2006) were launched: Best Practice, Mentorship and Patient Safety, with the intent that each project would enhance the others. This case study focuses on the work of the Patient Safety Project Team. The team developed a project framework and strategic plan, conducted a literature review and identified key concepts related to systems and patient safety. Strategies to integrate these concepts into the school's 15 nursing education programs are being implemented.
PubMed ID
17039995 View in PubMed
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What clinical learning contracts reveal about nursing education and patient safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147086
Source
Can Nurse. 2009 Oct;105(8):20-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
David Gregory
Lorna Guse
Diana Davidson Dick
Penny Davis
Cynthia K Russell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2009 Oct;105(8):20-5
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Contracts
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Emigrants and Immigrants - education - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Medication Errors - classification - nursing - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Nurses, Male - education - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Audit
Nursing Evaluation Research
Qualitative Research
Remedial Teaching
Safety Management - organization & administration
Students, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Systems Analysis
Abstract
While it is widely accepted that adopting a systems perspective is important for understanding and addressing patient safety issues, nurse educators typically address these issues from the perspective of individual student performance. In this study, the authors explored unsafe patient care events recorded in 60 randomly selected clinical learning contracts initiated for students in years 2, 3, and 4 of the undergraduate nursing program at the University of Manitoba. The contracts had been drawn up for students whose nursing care did not meet clinical learning objectives and standards or whose performance was deemed unsafe. Using qualitative content analysis, the authors categorized data pertaining to 154 unsafe patient care events recorded in these contracts.Thirty-seven students precipitated these events. Most events were related to medication administration (56%) and skill application (20%). A breakdown of medication administration events showed that the highest number were errors related to time (33%) and dosage (24%). International students and male students were responsible for a higher number of events than their numbers in the sample would lead one to expect. The findings support further study related to patient safety and nursing education.
PubMed ID
19947324 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.