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Do pre-employment influences explain the association between psychosocial factors at work and coronary heart disease? The Whitehall II study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148046
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 May;67(5):330-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Taina Hintsa
Martin J Shipley
David Gimeno
Marko Elovainio
Tarani Chandola
Markus Jokela
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Jussi Vahtera
Michael G Marmot
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 9, Helsinki, FIN-00014, Finland. taina.hintsa@helsinkifigi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 May;67(5):330-4
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Height
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Family Health
Finland - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - psychology
United States - epidemiology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
To examine whether the association between psychosocial factors at work and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) is explained by pre-employment factors, such as family history of CHD, education, paternal education and social class, number of siblings and height.
A prospective cohort study of 6435 British men aged 35-55 years at phase 1 (1985-1988) and free from prevalent CHD at phase 2 (1989-1990) was conducted. Psychosocial factors at work were assessed at phases 1 and 2 and mean scores across the two phases were used to determine long-term exposure. Selected pre-employment factors were assessed at phase 1. Follow-up for coronary death, first non-fatal myocardial infarction or definite angina between phase 2 and 1999 was based on clinical records (250 events, follow-up 8.7 years).
The selected pre-employment factors were associated with risk for CHD: HRs (95% CI) were 1.33 (1.03 to 1.73) for family history of CHD, 1.18 (1.05 to 1.32) for each quartile decrease in height and 1.16 (0.99 to 1.35) for each category increase in number of siblings. Psychosocial work factors also predicted CHD: 1.72 (1.08 to 2.74) for low job control and 1.72 (1.10 to 2.67) for low organisational justice. Adjustment for pre-employment factors changed these associations by 4.1% or less.
In this occupational cohort of British men, the association between psychosocial factors at work and CHD was largely independent of family history of CHD, education, paternal educational attainment and social class, number of siblings and height.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19819857 View in PubMed
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